What's the biggest gun manageable for a small woman?

I wanna take my gf to the range but she's just 5'3 and 120-130 lbs. I don't think she has ever shot anything but I've already been at the range once and tried every caliber except for 5.56 cause they had run out of it.

Do you think she will handle 7.62x39, 45 acp, 357 mag and 12 gauge (strong recoil), 5.56 (idk how strong recoil) and Uzi (weak recoil but often goes full auto for no reason) or should I only encourage her to try 22 lr, 9 mm and 38 spc?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Shooting guns has almost nothing to do with physical strength. If she has proper form and isn't afraid of loud noises or jerking sensations, any gun should be manageable.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This. Technique is far more important than strength.

      https://i.imgur.com/HVFkH0Z.gif

      I wanna take my gf to the range but she's just 5'3 and 120-130 lbs. I don't think she has ever shot anything but I've already been at the range once and tried every caliber except for 5.56 cause they had run out of it.

      Do you think she will handle 7.62x39, 45 acp, 357 mag and 12 gauge (strong recoil), 5.56 (idk how strong recoil) and Uzi (weak recoil but often goes full auto for no reason) or should I only encourage her to try 22 lr, 9 mm and 38 spc?

      As for the newbie question of "handling recoil" that has much more to do with the gun and the specific load in question than it does the caliber. Some 12ga loads are very stout. A clay target load is not. A .357 mag out of Python with a 10" barrel is easy to shoot. It fricking sucks out of an airweight snubbie.

      >>5.56 (idk how strong recoil)
      Very weak recoil, but can easily be very loud & have high muzzle blast if it has a short barrel and a big muzzlebrake. But the bigger worry is how you aren't sure what its recoil is like. Why are you taking a newbie shooting when you don't seem very competent yourself?

      >often goes full auto for no reason
      No way should you give a newbie that gun.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >often goes full auto for no reason
        No way should you give a newbie that gun.
        Ironically, it was the first gun I've shot. I only hit 2/10 shots at 10 metres, lol

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This. Lucas botkin has less muscle mass than most ethnic women. If she doesn't shoot well its because you suck as a teacher. Bigger guns are easier to shoot for everyone due to weight soaking up recoil, small guns being snappy is kinda true having a shitty grip on a small gun can make shooting unpleasant and even make her hands hurt.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Muh dick

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    .416 Rigby might be a little much, but anything short of a literal elephant gun should be fine if she isn't a b***h.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Post her feet and we will provide you with appropriate firearm recommendations.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't remember what's her foot size. I think it's pretty normal for a girl.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >gf is 5 foot, 115
    >head to range with .22 and 9mm handguns
    >she has fun hitting the target
    >make another trip to an outdoor range
    >bring the nugget
    >she wants to try it
    >she can barely lift it to hold it on target
    >use bench so she can rest her elbows on it
    >knocks her back a bit
    >big smile on her face though

    tldr: 7.62x54r

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    pretty much all women unanimously enjoy big metal-frame .45s

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >gf
    >wants to take her shooting
    >has never asked her if she's shot a gun
    Yeah I'll fricking believe that

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Get something with a tripod

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Smith & Wesson 500. You want to break her cherry so she builds up a tolerance to recoil.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's just flirting unless she can handle a m2 browning in the dark, in the middle of no where..

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Do you think she will handle 7.62x39, 45 acp, 357 mag and 12 gauge
    she can if she wants to. if she decides it isnt for her 9mm will be unmanagable, the gun too heavy and anything else that lets her get this shit over with and leave faster.
    its technique lol goodluck with that getting your girlfriend to listen at a range. then theres mindset, if shes already decided guns are loud and scary any gun is too much gun even if she should be physically able to handle it.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Start small, it might be all she can handle for a while but at least it's something.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    just make sure you only put one round in the mag or cylinder with each new caliber

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      checked and most important
      You can always shoot the gun first so she knows what to expect for noise. My buddy who had never shot a gun before said 7.62x39 had a lot of recoil, but that was before he shot some 12 gauge slugs. I started with the smallest amount of felt recoil, and moved up letting him know there will be more recoil, and telling him to put the stock in the pocket.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    SMG is a safe bet
    but if we go full semantically autism, a crew-served weapon (with bipod/tripod) is fine too

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    She can try handling my 3 incher first

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Gonna risk the shitty comments with this one just to give you advice. I'm an average girl, 5'5, 130 lbs. Milsurp and modern, I've shot just about every caliber you can think of.

    A few people in this thread say that technique is important, and I agree. I handle recoil better than guys who are much bigger and stronger than me, but less experienced. Solid stance, knowing the proper push/pull method when shouldering/holding the weapon makes a ton of difference, and I wish I had more instruction on this when I first started shooting. Looking at old videos when I had the stereotypical "chick lean," how I gripped guns improperly, etc. I cringe, but I can viscerally feel a drastic difference in how I've improved with shooting today. Those skills could be taught right from the start, so please give your gf the proper instruction instead of handing her a gun and letting her go wild.

    All that said, strength and comfort are also important to consider. I prefer pistol caliber carbines and bullpups. Shorter length of pull, lower recoil, etc. I also have soft hands so I prefer less aggressive grip textures. It's a lot more comfortable and effective for me. Doesn't mean I don't enjoy something stronger from time to time, but ultimately when I'm shooting for long periods and/or doing it seriously, I want to be comfortable. I have short arms and not as much strength as the men most of these guns are designed for, and that's a reality I have to deal with, no matter how much I, or any other woman wants to be a "bad b***h" and upstage the guys. I made the mistake of "liking them big" and insisting on guns that had too much recoil for me to effectively learn my fundamentals. I still learned them, but I think I would have had a much easier time starting with 5.56 and 9mm than Mosins and Desert Eagles. Start your gf with something small, and let her work her way up as her comfort level dictates.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Same anon, one more thing. Don't fall for the "small hands, small pistol" mistake that even a lot of gunstore employees push onto women. If shooting pistols, a smaller gun is going to be less controllable. It took me too long to discover that I'm a lot more comfortable shooting full size pistols even if they look comically large in my hands. Full size pistols are heavier, but that can work in her favor because it equates to less recoil. The important thing is the grip circumference, not the length. (Finger grooves suck though, because they're designed for much fatter fingers than mine and are not comfortable for most women.)

      Anyway, long story short, don't be afraid to give her proper instruction, let her shoot at her own pace starting small and working her way up, and take into consideration how comfortable the gun should feel to her in terms of grip ergonomics, length of pull, front heaviness of the gun, etc.

      Hope she has fun!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Same anon, one more thing. Don't fall for the "small hands, small pistol" mistake that even a lot of gunstore employees push onto women. If shooting pistols, a smaller gun is going to be less controllable. It took me too long to discover that I'm a lot more comfortable shooting full size pistols even if they look comically large in my hands. Full size pistols are heavier, but that can work in her favor because it equates to less recoil. The important thing is the grip circumference, not the length. (Finger grooves suck though, because they're designed for much fatter fingers than mine and are not comfortable for most women.)

      Anyway, long story short, don't be afraid to give her proper instruction, let her shoot at her own pace starting small and working her way up, and take into consideration how comfortable the gun should feel to her in terms of grip ergonomics, length of pull, front heaviness of the gun, etc.

      Hope she has fun!

      Please be my transbian girlfriend.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >PCCs
      Based, luv me 9mm, luv me stocks&optics.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You will never be a woman

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It might be better to go with something that has a stock at first instead of a pistol as it will be easier to stabilize the gun when she's not having to hold it at arms length. That and her shoulder can take the force of some of the recoil. Start out with something with very little recoil at first, and have her work up to the bigger guns once she has the right technique for holding the gun figured out.

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