What's the Better Lightweight Hiking Long Gun?

Going innawoods gets dangerous, a longer range and/or more powerful option to your handgun can be useful. Whether it's dealing with a rabid coyote that you don't want to get too close to, hunt small game without destroying it, scare away a samsquanch, or protecting yourself when you're told you have a pretty mouth. Outside of Grizzly country, only an AR with 50 Beowulf can help there, what's the most versatile option?

I'm trying to decide between taking my single shot shotgun or good 'ol semi-auto 22lr on multi-day backpacking excursions. It needs to be light, which both these cover. the versatility of shotgun different shotshells is useful, but so would the better precision and capacity of a 22 rifle.

what would you take?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WTF rifle is that? It sorta vaguely resembles my Win 190, with the obvious difference in the magazine

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Mossberg 702
      You can get them at walmart for $110 when they're on sale.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the 12 gauge
    thats all

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >. Outside of Grizzly country, only an AR with 50 Beowulf can help there, what's the most versatile option?
    SxS shotgun, 20 to 12 ga. Look for lighter models like IZh-58. Brenneke slug can fly through the full choke and kill dangerous game like bears, humans or feral hogs. Birdshot and buckshot is well grouped thanks to one full choke and one half choke.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not hiking in grizzly country. Just making sure that it's understood that I don't need anything super powerful for protection.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If the question is versatility then it's hard to argue with a shotgun. Even if you ignore large or dangerous animals it's still easily the most flexible option out there.

        Look at it this way: What can you do with each gun? A .22 is excellent for small game, assuming it's not moving much. It's marginal for anything else. A shotgun is great for small game, even if it's moving. And, with the right shells, it's excellent for anything larger as well.

        Unless this is some sort of long-term survival scenario where you need a lot of ammo the shotgun wins easily, IMHO.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A 12 gauge shotgun is easily the single more versatile gun you can bring with you innawoods, it literally doesn't matter what you need to shoot, if you just have a wide enough assortment of shells you can take it down.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >if you just have a wide enough assortment of shells you can take it down.
      the space and mass of 10 shotgunshells could be 30-50 of anything else.
      >yay i have 2xslugs, 3 00xbuck, and 5x assorted birdshot im ready for anything
      vs 1-3 mags of something else

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why are you gonna need 30-50 rounds innawoods?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Hard choice. If I could only choose one I'd probably go with shotgun because I don't particularly want to defend my ass against any coyote with a Mossberg 702. Hell I don't even want to defend my ass with my 10/22 I put together and trust (and that thing's ~$1600+ lol). On the other hand we have no clue how the shotgun is choked (fixed? interchangeable? adjustable?) or if it's cylinder/improved cyl/modified/full nor do I know what your ammo choice is like. Winchester white box 00 buck vs Federal Flite Control 00 buck is night and fricking day when it comes to spread. If you have a break action, theoretically you could have it strapped somewhere broke all the way open or even closed and have it pretty handy but you'd still have to load it. Pump action, a little heavier but at least all you have to do is pump it. The least pain in the ass option, though, is something like a Beretta 92 or Glock. Nearly 20 rounds in a small package and mags are pretty small. None of those other guns are particularly big but there's a lot of times hunting I bring a different rifle so I can hunt multiple types of game and it just gets in the way, especially when I try to sit or crouch, which then plugs the muzzle with dirt. Of course most people can't shoot a squirrel's brains out with a 9mm handgun though but at that point consider a Crickett or Ruger 10/22 Charger and a brace for in your pack.

          I may or may not have once spent 20rds of .22lr and 10rds of clay 12ga loads to free a stuck squirrel. I shot it while hunting and it got caught in the vines and shit. Quick tip: shoot from below to toss it up and out...or just throw some rocks and don't be moronic.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      does it have to be an o/u?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can be any shotgun you want

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not OP but frick I forgot about hydrodipped shotguns. Do you know what model that is specifically? It's silly but I do have the clothes to go with such a thing. I think that's dipped in Mossy Oak Treestand (?).

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're both useless choices. Get an AR chambered in 300 BLK instead just in case you come across a park ranger, non SBR'd. 300 BLK doesn't lose ballistic performance out of a 16 inches barrel when compared to SBR length, so you'll still have something that's lethal and effective for self-defense against animals.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I was going to say this but 5.56. Also you can carry spare dedicated .22lr upper to swap out depending on your situation. The spare upper doesn't take up much space; it could pretty much just be shoved down the side of your pack's main pocket. I've highly considered buying a CMMG dedicated .22lr upper to bring with me on fox/coyote hunts (I use my AR) so I don't have to carry two rifles in case no predators show up and I frick off to go squirrel hunting. I won't have my super nice silenced .22 if I bought a dedicated .22lr upper but I'm wearing electric muffs anyways hunting with a .223 so no big deal.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think you read the post at all. I'm not expecting to encounter anything that is going to actually attack me, and nothing larger than a coyote. I'm also backpacking for two to three days and an AR is going to weigh around 7lbs unloaded, and mags at around a 1lb each. I plan out my pack down to ounces and do not need any added weight. Both the guns I listed are around 4lbs. Also, 300blk would completely destroy a squirrel.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        NTA but 20rd mags of .223 or 5.56. Maybe two max. But yeah you're going to add quite some weight and bulk with an AR especially without a pencil barrel, etc. Could be worse though. Also a Remington 870 is about 7lbs FWIW. Maverick 88 about 6lbs. I'm sure a break would be cheaper and lighter but break action isn't my first choice for defense by a long shot. Are you expecting to be able to legally hunt or is it just a "just in case"?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Are you expecting to be able to legally hunt or is it just a "just in case
          It's just an added protection or tool in case anything happens well I'm out there. I only backpack in two areas I'm extremely familiar with and know there is no normally dangerous game. I'm also really not to worried about the most dangerous game, but I have encountered some weirdos and extremely hostile people out on the trails, and have been threatened, but that's why I've always carried a handgun anyways.

          I already own both of these firearms and I'm just trying to decide between things I already have. I plan on getting back out there in April and don't really need anything else added to my collection to become familiar with. For example, a good friend recommended a Henry AR-7 and another friend a takedown 20 gauge, but I really don't want to spend that money or time.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I haven't heard flattering things about the modern AR-7 FWIW. I believe it was Burt in Handgun General that knows about the quality and design changes who I originally heard it from. If I really had to choose and you're not expecting bear, I'd find a nice light .22 with a folding stock and a 16" barrel ideally. If not, no big deal, but it does save quite some length - specifically the B-TM for the 10/22 saves a lot of length. If you might be in more dangerous areas where a coyote (or multiple) or even weird ass people might be a problem, then yeah, I'm probably going to lean more heavily towards my one long gun being a shotgun no matter what kind, even if I have a handgun. Downside being that IMO it isn't as convenient to take small game like squirrels with (and oh god, all the damn shot in the meat...) but I am HEAVILY biased towards hunting with a rifle as it's really all I know and the patterning I experienced from my (improved cylinder) 870 wasn't something I was impressed with when even using small game ammo IIRC. Damn gaps. Flite Control 00 buck was decent though, but still had gaps I was iffy on; I've yet to test Flite Control no 4 or similar size FFC buck so that may be more impressive. I personally don't like to have to shoot something more than I have to and between gaps in pattern and some other concerns like distance, I don't often find myself bringing a shotgun. I want to know I either hit something or didn't, not that I may have skimmed it with a small percent of the pellets I shot. For defense, though, increasing your chance of a hit even with a garbage shot is nice, though you're much more heavily limited by distance unlike a rifle. However around 30-45 yards? Hell Flite Control does the job quite well. Even cheap Winchester White Box 00 buck is decent as long as you're IIRC around 15-20yds and it spreading faster might be ideal in some situations. I have the rolls of paper I used to pattern my 870 when ammo testing somewhere.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if all you’re doing is scaring coyotes and shooting squirrel just take more ammo for your handgun you idiot.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You ever try shooting a squirrel from 30+ yards with a handgun? Not that easy, turbotard.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Get better? To be honest I sincerely doubt you backpack to any capacity.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I don't doubt you're a homosexual. I also backpack to about a capacity of 55 to 65 liters depending on the pack I use.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Sure you do.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you're not planning on shooting anything a pistol or takedown 22. If you're hunting than the appropriate hunting rifle or shotgun.

    Coyotes aren't bothering an adult male.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Coyotes aren't bothering an adult male
      I'm not worried about normal old coyotes. I have encountered rabid ones (not scared of humans, just standing there, foaming from the mouth) well out on backpacking trails. Last one I encountered with my dad about 6 years ago, and he had to get it with his pocket CCW. He had to get a closer than he would've liked (20-15 yards) and a shotgun with buck shot or a 22lr rifle could've added distance. It's an event that's stuck with me and something I want to prepare for better.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why hasn't anybody ever made a speed loader for combination/over under guns? Sure its just two rounds but they could still be handy

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Of your choices, the shotgun is what I'd pick.
    Still, I think a 16" .357 lever gun would be even better. Something like a Rossi R92 can do just about everything you're trying to do better than the guns you listed. Load .38s for small game and .357s for everything else.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I get to use the 22lr more than a full-scale rifle. Scares hikers less, too. If you want to take a shotgun with you, go for it, but park rangers might try to nig on your camping, assuming you're hunting.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    45-70 trapper (16” barrel) with bubbas pissin hot loads, 405g

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