What's the best channel to learn gunsmithing?

I think this boomer's got some good stuff, any other recs?

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

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250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buy a piece of shit gun and work on it yourself. 99.99999% of being a gunsmith is being able to use hand and power tools efficiently and work metal. A machinist makes a better gunsmith than anyone that has studied gunsmithing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You read picrel yet? It's not advertised as a gunsmithing book, but is really the most fundamental one there is, other than a basic machine shop reference manual.

      This. Best rec you'll ever get: learn to use machine tools.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >You read picrel yet? It's not advertised as a gunsmithing book, but is really the most fundamental one there is, other than a basic machine shop reference manual.
        Not OP, but what are you talking about?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Buy a piece of shit gun and work on it yourself.
      Pretty fricking good idea. What would you reccommend for shitty/worn out pump actions? Any particular things to look for that could be worked on? Is there a point where you're looking at unsafe levels of wear? I feel at some point most gun shops wouldn't bother selling such trashed guns so maybe look for old timers at gun shows to find good candidates.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Literally any of them,, whatever you happen to come across, if the point is to learn. Even if the gun is totally fricked and will never be safe to shoot again you can still practice shortening barrels, soldering on sights, engraving, bluing, fixing stock defects, etc.
        You're right that a lot of shops won't bother selling trashed guns, but it never hurts to ask. Gun shops, pawn shops, etc, often get shit guns as part of a deal, estate sale, etc, and just keep them around in the back. You will also find guns that are known to need a lot of work being sold as "GSS" or "Gun Smith Specials". Look for those.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Good to know, thanks. Use every part of the buffalo.

          >shitty/worn out pump actions? Any particular things to look for that could be worked on?
          Easiest is to start with muzzleloader.

          Learn how a trigger/sear/hammer/tumlber relationship works.
          Learn how to recut a sear/safety notch
          Learn how the barrel is fitted to the stock
          Learn to understand the concept of headspace: in a muzzleloader, the breech is solid so all pressure is contained and goes forward out the muzzle

          Then move onto a single action percussion revolver
          The hammer/sear/trigger relationship you learned from a side lock will look very familiar, the only difference is there will now be a hand and cylinder stop attached
          Learn how the relationship in those work, how to stretch the hand to advance timing, cut the bolt to fit timing

          Then move onto a double action cartridge revolver. Get one of those cheapo h&r iver johnson top breaks that run <$100. They will teach you how a DA system works since they use chamelot delvigne lockwork which will make a lot of sense if you're already familiar the tumbler/sear/trigger relationship from muzzleloaders

          After that you can move onto other hammer-fired guns like a colt or smith and wesson action DA revolver, or hammer fired shotguns, etc

          The added bonus of starting with muzzleloaders is they are usully very cheap and the repro ones have lots of spare parts available (but learn to handfit them yourself)

          I have zero experience with muzzleloaders sadly so for me a pump shotgun would be a good starter. Especially if it's got shitty worn out wooden furniture. I'm more interested in restoring the materials than learning the specific actions.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >shitty/worn out pump actions? Any particular things to look for that could be worked on?
        Easiest is to start with muzzleloader.

        Learn how a trigger/sear/hammer/tumlber relationship works.
        Learn how to recut a sear/safety notch
        Learn how the barrel is fitted to the stock
        Learn to understand the concept of headspace: in a muzzleloader, the breech is solid so all pressure is contained and goes forward out the muzzle

        Then move onto a single action percussion revolver
        The hammer/sear/trigger relationship you learned from a side lock will look very familiar, the only difference is there will now be a hand and cylinder stop attached
        Learn how the relationship in those work, how to stretch the hand to advance timing, cut the bolt to fit timing

        Then move onto a double action cartridge revolver. Get one of those cheapo h&r iver johnson top breaks that run <$100. They will teach you how a DA system works since they use chamelot delvigne lockwork which will make a lot of sense if you're already familiar the tumbler/sear/trigger relationship from muzzleloaders

        After that you can move onto other hammer-fired guns like a colt or smith and wesson action DA revolver, or hammer fired shotguns, etc

        The added bonus of starting with muzzleloaders is they are usully very cheap and the repro ones have lots of spare parts available (but learn to handfit them yourself)

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Learn how to recut a sear/safety notch
          Just stop there don't

          >Easiest is to start with muzzleloader.
          Such fricking bullshit on here as usual, never touch an old muzzleloader, the geometry is absolutely critical, much more so than in most modern actions which are generally simpler and more robust than a flintlock. What you told me with your post is you know nothing about guns and have never actually wporked on an old gun

          >the concept of headspace: in a muzzleloader
          Just kys bullshitter. People like you have bad lives.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >never touch an old muzzleloader, the geometry is absolutely critical
            I have made over a dozen longrifles and own eight originals, but I have no idea what this means

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I own 100+ long guns and understand exactly what geometry means in a lock. The problem with bullshitters is they genuinely believe everyone else is making it up as they do

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                On a percussion gun you would know the position of the half wiener doesn't matter, and it's not rocketscience to cut the single action sear and reharden

                >flintlock
                yeah okay that's more difficult but percussion is literally babby tier to work on

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                please stop, I own well over 100 original guns and have regularly worked on e.g original enfield percussion locks doing repairs with antique replacement parts. Please just shut up. Stop. There is nothing simple about making a save percussion lock work without the parts or dealing with serious wear. Its highly skilled there are only a handful of gunsmiths world wide who can do good lock repair work. You're embarrassing yourself

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >it's not rocketscience to cut the single action sear and reharden
                any idea how moronic you sound?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >this homie trying to gatekeep gunsmithing when you can buy everything you need at walmart

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >what geometry means in a lock
                https://americanlongrifles.org/forum/index.php?topic=45209.0

                https://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/threads/flintlock-geometry.124923/

                https://www.go2gbo.com/threads/flintlock-geometry.386832/

                etc

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What makes you think OP is going to 1) find an original flintlock for cheap and 2) decide to yank off the wiener and frizzen and make new ones from scratch? Chances are if he's buying a cheap muzzleloader in America he's going to end up with a modern production rifle made by CVA, T/C, and similar, or he's going to end up with an export grade percussion shotgun. The most common mode of failure on any of the original locks I own have been broken or worn out springs, and anyone who calls himself a gunsmith should be able to make an heat treat a simple leaf spring.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >, the breech is solid
          this is untrue by the way, aside from the fire channel in the chamber and its hole leading to the nipple or pan the breech is terminated by a breech plug which is screwed into the barrel

          Good to know, thanks. Use every part of the buffalo.

          [...]
          I have zero experience with muzzleloaders sadly so for me a pump shotgun would be a good starter. Especially if it's got shitty worn out wooden furniture. I'm more interested in restoring the materials than learning the specific actions.

          start off pillar bedding a cheap bolt action like a savage axis and properly mount scope rings, reloading etc work your way up to re crowning,reaming a match chamber while you learn bluing, browning, cleaning, Never frick with any sear. If you can't even reload what the frick are you doing fricking with e,g chambers?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >terminated by a breech plug which is screwed into the barrel
            I assume he's referring to the fact there are no moving parts involved with the chamber. There's no action to open and close, no feeding, no cylinder. It's just mechanically simpler.

            Good to know, thanks. Use every part of the buffalo.

            [...]
            I have zero experience with muzzleloaders sadly so for me a pump shotgun would be a good starter. Especially if it's got shitty worn out wooden furniture. I'm more interested in restoring the materials than learning the specific actions.

            >I'm more interested in restoring the materials than learning the specific actions.
            Any gun works for that, so long as it's wood and steel. I don't think muzzleloader kits are bad for learning fundamentals. Even if you don't give a shit about muzzleloaders and how they work you're still learning things like finishing (bluing, etc.), woodwork on the stock, etc. They're not a bad part of learning gunsmithing.

            Don't forget you can make endless practice work for yourself. Treat the beater guns, kits, etc, as an educational expense. Buy some used gun and fix it up. After you've fixed it come up with some silly project for it that forces you to do a bunch of work to it. When you're done with that go bash a tree with it until the stock breaks. Oopise! Now fix it again. After you've turned some old POS bubbaed whatever from a cyberpunk-themed art piece with tacticool shit all over it into a fudd-pleasing target rifle and back again a few times you'll have learned a lot about materials and finishes.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >the breech is terminated by a breech plug which is screwed into the barrel
            which doesn't move or need adjustment

            Once you understand the purpose of a solid breech, then headspacing cartridges will make sense.
            This is why boomers and zoomers who try to learn what headspace is by starting with bottlenecked rifle cartridges get confused and never understand how to check headspace on rimmed / belted / case mouth headspacing cartridges

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              o shut up you've never worked on a gun in your life stfu

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Anvil is pretty decent, he does a lot of rare quirky stuff.

        Any gun that's cheap and common will be fantastic to learn on. Get guns that interest you and do repairs/modifications/improvements that fit your tastes. Be intimately familiar with what your working on, don't take a file to something that you don't completely understand the function of.
        Like other anons have been saying, learning machining will teach you most of the techniques you'd use.
        My lgs gets lots of shitpipes that have minor parts missing or broken that I've been able to get cheap. I got a 1911 for $100 that just needed a new triple spring to function and a $50 h&r .30-30 with janky sights that I've since put a scope rail on and rechambered for .30-30AI. Hit up every gun or pawn shop in your area and you should be able to find somewhere with good deals on shitters you won't feel bad about messing up

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the most important gunsmithing skills are being able to compress 20lb springs with only one finger, filing straight, and using a lathe.

      >never touch an old muzzleloader, the geometry is absolutely critical
      I have made over a dozen longrifles and own eight originals, but I have no idea what this means

      were they all kit guns? that guy from the nra colonial gunsmith video used to teach classes but I never got a chance to go to one.

      >the breech is terminated by a breech plug which is screwed into the barrel
      which doesn't move or need adjustment

      Once you understand the purpose of a solid breech, then headspacing cartridges will make sense.
      This is why boomers and zoomers who try to learn what headspace is by starting with bottlenecked rifle cartridges get confused and never understand how to check headspace on rimmed / belted / case mouth headspacing cartridges

      headspace is defined as the distance between the breech face and the point where forward movement of a cartridge stops. a muzzleloader doesn't have headspace because it doesn't have a chamber.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >a muzzleloader doesn't have headspace because it doesn't have a chamber
        Exactly, the headspace is effectively zero because the the only place for combustion pressures to push is forward

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          the only place for combustion to go in any firearm is forwards. a paper cartridge sharps or a dreyse needle gun don't have a chamber with headspace either even though they are breech loaders. headspace is a concept that specifically relates to metallic cartridges.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >were they all kit guns?
        I made them all from blanks, precarve kits never really interested me much.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          did you make the locks though?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I've put together a few from castings that worked fine, but most used locks that I bought.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              does that really make you an expert on lock geometry then? especially if it is something fancy like a double set trigger.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What are you talking about? I never claimed to be an expert on lock geometry in this thread, my first post was confused by someone going off about how geometry for old muzzleloaders is why OP should stay away from them. You seem to have an axe to grind and I'm not the wheel you're looking for. Assembling a lock from rough castings took a fair amount of work with hand files and rudimentary tumbler mills and mock ups with sheet brass to ensure the flint would strike the frizzen at a decent angle, but it's not like it's impossible for someone to figure out.
                What do you mean by
                >fancy like a double set trigger
                All you need to do different for those is include a fly on the tumbler. Those are tedious for sure, but not some insurmountable task. I made mine from drill rod and O1 steel brazed together.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                the point of contention is that recutting the notches on a tumbler to fix a broken lock is not an easy project for someone just learning.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I didn’t post that homegril, go be mad at someone else. That said, someone without the means and know how of making and fitting a new tumbler shouldn’t call himself a gunsmith. It’s not exactly a difficult task if you have the original tumbler on hand as a go-by

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Randy Selby has some videos on rifle smithing.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I want to fit a revolver into a traditional milsurp rifle stock. I'm thinking of taking off the trigger and extending the trigger lower.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the blast from the cylinder gap will frick up any wood that's near it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Brazilian monkeys have already fixed that problem.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How's a career in gunsmithing?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I tried it and am currently unemployed so not so good maybe

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