What type of engine does this thing use?

What type of engine does this thing use?
i know its rocket engine but what type of engine can be turned on and off like this?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my car sounded like that when the timing was off

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    peroxide
    or any hypergolic fuel

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      And if I remember, it`s running continuously with rotating vanes directing the jets.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >turned on and off like this?
    yeah pretty stupid wy not just moderate it properly

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      oh really captain jerk. describe how to moderate it "properly".

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        never heard of proportional control lol noob
        gooogle pid before you embarass yourself any further

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          you have no fricking clue what you are talking about or why they did it that way. the point of that test was to prove that they could track an infrared target not have proportional control thrusters which also aren't needed in space.

          the only reason they are firing so often is because it's under the influence of gravity.

          they are using peroxide engines and a platinum catalyst. basically steam thrusters. just like the early rocket packs for people.

          so shut your little prostitute mouth.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >proportional control thrusters which also aren't needed in space.
            stupidest thing ive read in a long time not by a tripposter

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              In space it's more important to have simplicity and efficiency. The reaction happens at a set rate, less than that means no thrust, and trying to make some moronic vectoring system to control thrust just adds more things to break and kill you.
              You thrust proportioning is using short bursts.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                STOP BEING REASONALBE YOU SLIME PIECE OF DIRT

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >it's under the influence of gravity
            it's clearly not tho. basic physics, you don't get that consistent of a hover without a consistent force, in this case being supplied by a string.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >in this case being supplied by a string.

              I bet you don't believe man walked on the moon either.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              it is though.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                is it though?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                yes

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              why would you talk so confidently and then say something so stupid it betrays that you haven't even seen the video in question. In the vid it has an initial liftoff from the ground. There is no string...

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >initial liftoff
                can't imagine how THAT could be accomplished

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                can you imagine being moronic? oh? you don't have to?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          read a bit into rocket engines, ISP and exhaust velocity. then laugh at your proportional control proposal.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Seems to be working pretty well with two states of on or off. Maybe the compact design of '08 didn't allow room valving beyond an on and off. They would also require a very quick reaction time, at the time they might not have been able to get a regulated valve to react quick enough.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    M
    U
    R
    ACID
    T
    I
    C

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >muriatic
      Its hydrochloric acid. This isn't 19th century Britain anymore, boomer. Get with the times and use IUPAC names for chemicals

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hyperbolic propellants, it's just a valve, if it opens they go boom.
    Usually peroxide based, caustic as frick, but reliable.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      isn't this extremely toxic?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the only byproduct of a peroxide jet is steam

        It's a solid rocket engine and it isn't being turned on an off. Thrust is being redirected through different outlets

        pic related

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          lol no, peroxide's a shit propellant. Here it's probably hydrazine-nitrogen tetroxide:
          https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA344798.pdf
          And yes, solid rocket boosters are legitimately used for ballistic missile divert and attitude control thrusters.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            H2O2 engines.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I'm not watching that. It's not using hydrogen peroxide, because hydrogen peroxide exhaust wouldn't be yellow.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        unreacted propellant would be, everything else turns into water(steam). A cleaner burning engine would lessen unburnt byproducts but at the same time is extremely difficult concerning build constraints(caustic propellant quickly wearing down critical parts). I doubt they were concerned with totality of burn for this proof of concept but if its ever used around people that would change.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Hyperbolic propellants
      NO.

      isn't this extremely toxic?

      Peroxides are unhealthy but not extremely so. Hydrazine, on the other hand, is a major hazard.

      https://i.imgur.com/hP39442.png

      lol no, peroxide's a shit propellant. Here it's probably hydrazine-nitrogen tetroxide:
      https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA344798.pdf
      And yes, solid rocket boosters are legitimately used for ballistic missile divert and attitude control thrusters.

      Had it been hydrazine powered, people would have to wear hazmat suits. In some videos, people were sown in normal clothing next to these.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The best thing about hyperbolic propellants is that their capabilities are limitless.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it's hyperGolic

          • 4 weeks ago
            theBoss

            You should have told Alex you wanted "bad math jokes for 400"

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You should have told Alex you wanted "bad math jokes for 400"

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >The best thing about hyperbolic propellants is that their capabilities are limitless.
          I know

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's a solid rocket engine and it isn't being turned on an off. Thrust is being redirected through different outlets

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Some missiles use multiple small solid rockets but it is not what is shown in OP's. They are coming out of the exact same hole.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mentos and cola.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's using hydrazine and NTO. Proportional valves tend to be bigger and heavier than a valve that just opens and closes. Response time is also better with an on/off valve and that helps with control loop stability. While engines can be throttled you'll get much higher performance running an engine at the limits of its capabilities. Everyone in this thread is terminally moronic.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's an hypergolic pair linked to a PWM-controlled ON/OFF valve.
    Hypergolic propellants ignite when contacting themselves.
    You control the ON/OFF output of the valves, you control the near-constant thrust of the engine.
    You just use PWM to control for how long you have to open the valve to counteract gravity.
    I think BPS.space made a video about it, but I'm not sure, maybe it was another DIY rocket science youtuber. It was a nice proof of concept.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Proportional motors for maneuvering thrusters aren't generally a thing. You're making tiny adjustments, and the extra weight and complexity just doesn't make sense. I'd also note that the prolonged burn sequence seen in those videos will never happen in actual use. It most likely consumed its entire propellant load in that video.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Monopropellent.

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