What technology did japan invent during ww2?

What technology did japan invent during ww2? I know the germans did most of the heavy lifting, but are there any major breakthroughs the japs actually had?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What technology did japan invent during ww2?
    suicide drones

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >kirring myserf not to dishona famiry
      Those arent tech. Its just the moronic narrow eyed chink brain at work

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Well you know the first rule of Bushido: If at first you dont succeed, have a nice day so you wont fail again

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I know it's a joke but the Germans had the Goliath.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unironically nothing. By 1943 the IJN was half a decade behind the USN in technological capability.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I know they were backwards but not by a decade moron. The chinks still had advanced fighters like the ki 84 fighter. They just lacked resources

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I know they were backwards but not by a decade moron.
        they were literally a decade behind in some technologies
        captured japanese radios at guadalcanal were examined and found to be similiar to radios that the US had employed in the 1930s

        modern radio sets were very rare even in the late war and were often reserved for battalion HQ or higher

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Then its a resource problem. The reason why they could not mass distribute any modern technology, like radios, was cause they lack the industrial power to transition, especially under war circumstances

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you are lazy to read, it says early Japanese aircraft radios sucked, war time copies were okay and oddly enough their late war indigenous designs were on par with allied designs.

          One thing to note about almost all Japanese equipment, be it infantry gear, planes or ships; they had really old stuff in frontline use and used them until they were spent.
          That's just because their industry could not produce enough to replace the old gear like Americans could.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Chinks =/= japs/nips

        Get your slurs right you slack-jawed wetback.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's why I said half a decade, double-moron
        >calling Japanese chinks
        Oh you're in middle school and can't differentiate your slurs

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Didn't they develop some kind of super aluminum for aviation?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    7075 extra super duralumin which helped give the Zero it’s absurd range and performance

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Weird enough: They just couldn't get the metallurgy right to build high powered (water cooled) aviation engines.
      >Invent awesome aluminum alloy
      >Completely fail with steel alloys
      Really makes you think about ten thousand times folded grorious nippon steel huh?

      OP: Germans sent them tons of blueprints over the course of the war. Sometimes even hardware so they could reverse-engineer (I remember one of the Daimler-Benz flight engines) but they sucked

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Priorities. IJN had a huge influence and experience proved radials we're the only viable kind of engine in the pacific. The Ha40 (DB601Aa) was absolutely mediocre with the high temps and low maintenance of the pacific. All BMW derivatives weren't good enough. Even the US simply dropped the serious development of big V12s. The Allison V1710 was excellent but gimped due to priorities. The Packard Merlin was the best Merlin tho.

        In radials Japan was ok if you ignore the complete lack of high PN (octane) fuel, Only Pratt & Whitney had a real edge above any other engine maker, The Wright were good in the 30s but they failed with more complex designs (compared to P&W). The Homare was moronic tho (an enlarged Sakae with continous WEP), their Ha104 and Ha112-II were far superior.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The Homare is a sort of endearing type of moronic, tiny as shit puts out a ton of power it's a radial that runs at inline RPMs and has a frickhuge tank for cooling, it's like a flying identity crisis

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    japan were leaders in torpedo technology and night fighting tactics at the start of the war
    the battle of savo island was a rare moment the japanese got to use their night fighting to its fullest extent and pulled a one-sided victory
    japanese optical gunnery was also top notch, anecdotes have claimed that the yamato had superior optical sights to any existing allied ships, though this cant be verified due to lack of access to them and the secrecy surrounding the yamatos construction

    not really advanced, per se, but highly novel and effective was the knee mortar
    a tiny mortar that could be wrapped around your leg (dont actually fire it from your leg)
    they were issued as the primary indirect fire weapon of infantry platoons and were effective at providing lightweight and portable firepower to platoons

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I asked for inventions you moronic Black person. So are asians just shit at inventing new things besides copying the white man, but good at innovating things?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        First pure oxygen torpedo is not an invention to you?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > Invention involves creating something entirely new, for example the first light bulbs or the telephone. Innovation, on the other hand, is the process of improving the existing creations or finding new applications for them

          Eat cyanide you moronic son of a Black person

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you wanna play word games only the Americans can claim to have invented anything in WWII

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >hurr muh word games

              Give your head a wobble nig.

              Entirely new like using an oxidiser nobody before you managed to handle?
              [...]
              The bongs tried oxygen enriched air. Not pure oxygen

              If you cant create something out of the new, then its not an invention, moron. Innovations are working on existing products, made for existing products. Are your parents as dumb as you?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Give your head a wobble nig.
                Prove me wrong Black person, airplanes were invented by America, nukes were invented by America, mass production of automobiles on assembly lines is American. Literally everything used else is improving existing creations or finding new applications for them which means they aren’t inventions.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This is your frat boy brain on autistic 4chin infographs.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                He's right though.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The US didn't invent the automobile or the assembly line.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                By that logic nothing is invented, everything is innovated. A lightbulb is an innovation from the candle, a candle from a campfire, a campfire from the sun. I don't believe a dumb Black person like you could get past the captcha let alone post this stupidity

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It would be closer to not calling different Incandescent lightbulbs separate inventions by filament.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              If we're being pedantic, Germany invented nukes first but didn't think the engineering problems were solvable so didn't even try.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Entirely new like using an oxidiser nobody before you managed to handle?

            They were not the first.
            The Bongs created it, but didn't want to implement it in their arsenal due to how dangerous and unstable the process was.

            The bongs tried oxygen enriched air. Not pure oxygen

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No one invented anything, ever, then.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They were not the first.
          The Bongs created it, but didn't want to implement it in their arsenal due to how dangerous and unstable the process was.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        moron.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Who did whites copy then?
        I guess stealing credit is the wigger's way. YT didn't even invent guns yet ran away with the idea

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Night fighting on land and sea. 'Knee mortars' getting issued widely. A very nice magazine fed LMG, possibly the best in class.

      Biological weapons.
      Japan probably had the biggest potential for pathogen warfare of anyone at the time.
      They held back from using it for lack of ability to control the outcome, but do appear to have used them in China.

      Extensive use in China, and probably the one actual deterrent against Soviets making a move earlier. If they were serious about wining after Midway these had to come into play as fast as possible, preferably on port cities via the I-400 hybrid subs (which Yamamoto wanted at the start of any hostilities to take out the Panama Canal & do brush fire raids up the Pacific coast).

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Biological warfare is the 2nd most dangerous to nukes. Imagine a country weaponising a virus, and that virus causing takeouts in the world economy, in life, in military, billions of dollars wiped out

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >billions of dollars wiped out
          lolpowerinmisery.goatse

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            cruelty squad online when?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yea…imagine…….

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Biological warfare is the 2nd most dangerous
          its a meme. Viruses are contradictionary to war aims as the kill fast and burn out fast only in their very first forms. All the evolutionary pressure is for them to adopt to the host to not kill it and survive by jumping between them

          You can have your super aids-ebola as a one time shot. After which it kills the designated area and offsprings of it spread out mutating until it can survive longer

          chemicals can poison areas and also spread out randomly with wind which makes the dubious. NOOOK overhyping has been discussed to death even on /k/. In general WMDs are overrated as frick fuelled by doomer porn fantasies that want to imagine a real armageddon is possible with the wet farts the overconfident human monkey produces

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            the explosion of a 1000 pound bomb is very small compared what area you could contaminated with 1000 pound anthrax

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Bioweapons are stupid and dubiously effective. There's a reason why nobody stockpiles them.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I think something that isn't transmissible from person to person and isn't lethal, just really unpleasant, would be pretty useful as an A2/AD weapon. Anyone trying to occupy a region getting the megashits until they leave would be a great way to demoralize your enemy and waste their resources.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Why do that when industrially produced low volitility organophosphates can achieve the same end with far greater lethality?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                idk why you would, good point.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              doesn't work on indians, as china found out.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Indians are just very strong and manly, western armies can cope witch CBRN equipment and training, but Indians where born in toxic environment, they drank, ate and breathed things you people wouldn't believe

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That shit is supposedly so stinky that it can literally kill people, like you just cough and vomit so much you can't breath. Reporters described the smell as "An overpowering mix of rotting meat, old socks that haven’t been washed for weeks – topped off with the pungent waft of an open sewer." and "Imagine taking a chunk of rotting corpse from a stagnant sewer, placing it in a blender and spraying the filthy liquid in your face. Your gag reflex goes off the charts and you can't escape, because the nauseating stench persists for days." Meanwhile Indians can drink the stuff.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Those who can tolerate the smell can drink the liquid also.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >you will live to witness man made horrors beyond your comprehension
                India is the going to be the birth place of Nurgle

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                it's the fricking home of Nurgle

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >. A very nice magazine fed LMG, possibly the best in class.
        the type99 was about average for its day in terms of effectiveness
        but it was still saddled with useless features like a bayonet lug
        both it and the bren were inspired by the ZB26, hence their similarities

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I don't think a bayonet lug is much of an issue with already heavy weapon, unless you really want to use it. Apparenty the scope was pretty good.

          What's up with the fire rate though? I thought 550rpm listed in some wikipedia pages was just an errondeous copypaste from Type 96, but that's apparently what original Japanese documents state. 800rpm comes from some American leaflets.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            However they calculated rpm might have been different from the Americans

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > Night fighting on land and sea
        How’d that work out?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >ww1 battlecruiser vs bleeding edge fast battleship
          i bet you felt real smart remembering the Kirashima.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Let me add one more: Amphibious tanks. The SNLF fielded the first purpose-built amphib tank in the world.

          Pretty bloody for the US Navy on multiple occasions.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >bow of USS Minneapolis (CA-36)
            Always gets a laugh outta me.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              The temporary 'repair' is the best part.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Well that's not supposed to happen now is it

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The SNLF fielded the first purpose-built amphib tank in the world.
            And yet the IJA had better amphib units and landing boats
            lmao

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > preferably on port cities via the I-400 hybrid sub
        Absolutely not. You’d be better off sending a single carrier on a suicide mission.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >(dont actually fire it from your leg)
      >instructions unclear, right kneecap currently poking out the back of my leg, please send help

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        does this look like the israeliteTube comments section to you, homosexual?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You have the tism

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          NTA
          It's banter you gay

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Agreed the Type 93 torpedo was way ahead of its time. One of my favorites was the type 3 anti-aircraft 16 inch shell not a very effective weapon when used in its intended role. But when fired as an incendiary weapon was super effective against ground targets.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The secrets of the Long Lance were:
      1) they were larger and heavier than standard 21" torpedoes
      2) the IJN was crazy enough to use pure compressed oxygen as its primary oxidizer
      The latter is really the key point. Nobody else thought the IJN would do something as crazy, almost suicidal, as carrying equipment for making, compressing, and storing pure oxygen in large volumes on their ships. This did come back to bite them a few times later in the war, but honestly, the ships that were crippled or destroyed as a result of catastrophic oxygen-rich fires were in many cases doomed already.

      In a nutshell, it was crazy, but they largely got away with it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >In a nutshell, it was crazy, but they largely got away with it.
        WW2 Japan in general
        until 1942

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The mix the torpedo actually started it's engine with had a smaller part of oxygen and it gradually increased it to 100% O2 once it was already running in the water.
        The oxygen itself also wasn't in the torpedo from the start, they had ozygen generators on board for that.
        Main source of trouble was utterly shit damage control that led to the conventional warheads cooking off before they could control the fires or throw them overboard.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They had the best torpedoes bar none through the course of the war.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >indirect fire
      Barely and rarely. It's a very short-ranged weapon

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    fire-and-forget guided antiship missiles.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I know the germans did most of the heavy lifting
    Don't make me giggle anon!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >germans did most of the heavy lifting
      Jet engine was invented by the British

      > In 1935, Hans von Ohain started work on a similar design to Whittle's in Germany, and it is often claimed that he was unaware of Whittle's work.[15] Ohain said that he had not read Whittle's patent, and Whittle believed him (Frank Whittle 1907–1996). However, the Whittle patent was in German libraries, and Whittle's son had suspicions that Ohain had read or heard of it.[citation needed]

      Either way both nations developed them independently. But i guess this proves chink brains are just uncreative, like hitler said

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >HERRO YOU WANT FRY PRANE?

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >germans did most of the heavy lifting
    Jet engine was invented by the British

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      British where barking up the centrifugal jet, only the soviets used that past the 50s.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >only the soviets used that past the 50s.
        Not only centrifugal engines were superior up to late 40s, but the basis for the efficient axial compressor was invented by A. Griffith (He was kinda against Frank Whittle's simpler deigns).
        And centrifugal compressor are relevant, a lot of thurboshaft engines rely on them (axial+last stage centrifugal), nearly all cheap turbojets still are centrifugal (like the MALD's engine).

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Their 1-400s series of submarines might have given the American a helping hand in the designing the nuclear submarines after the war.
    Their bio weapon program also might have helped in the further development of medicine and epidemiology, but I don't really know.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Biological weapons.
    Japan probably had the biggest potential for pathogen warfare of anyone at the time.
    They held back from using it for lack of ability to control the outcome, but do appear to have used them in China.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Interesting to see how virus couldve been an even more effective weapon of warfare than nukes

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It wasn't just about it being effective, it was about it being basically a wildfire that you can start, but not put out.
        Imagine releasing the Spanish Flu 2.0 during the middle of WW2.
        Would it end the war? Probably not. Would it kill shitloads without discrimination? Certainly. Would it probably make its way back to Japan? Certainly.
        >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_PX

        At best you could release small bacterial plagues on certain areas to 'soften them up' but do everything you could to minimize spread out from those locations ahead of time.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >japan will earn the derison of the world

          Now its china’s turn for the WuFlu

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >They held back from using it for lack of ability to control the outcome
      And also because of the possibility of the US flipping their shit, same reasons they didn't use chemical weapons. The command wasn't bright enough to call off Pearl Harbor but they recognized that letting those particular genies out of the bottle was extremely inadvisable because the US would start dealing with them like they were dealing with the Chinese.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The US had bio weapons?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It was a leader in anti-bacterial treatments, but I don't believe that there was much in the way of bio-warfare being pursued at the time.
          Big Pharma was born because of the US government subsidizing penicillin manufacture in the early 40s.
          But beyond standard lab stocks, I don't think the US had much ability to weaponize biological agents. But I could be wrong on that.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Sort of. In the ass-end of WWI the US experimented with shells that used ricin and in the 20s the chemical warfare office said that the US should start looking into bioweapons because everyone else was but their recommendation was ignored. We were well aware in 1941 (when tension with Japan really started to escalate) that the Japs both had biological and chemical weapons programs and had successfully deployed both in China and so baby steps were taken in that direction but a program wasn't formally commenced until 1942 and by the end of the war it was still in its infancy. However, the Japs THOUGHT we had bioweapons thanks to Shiro "there's no substitute for human testing" Ishii saying so after his world tour in the 20s because he was trying to secure funding for his own bioweapons programs. Unit 731's data later ended up bootstrapping the US program considerably.

          During the Cold War, the US rapidly eclipsed the Soviets to become the world leader in biological warfare by a comfortable margin until Nixon decided that this particular meatball was a bit too spicy and unconditionally ended all offensive bioweapons research and development in 1969. This was then followed by the Biological Warfare Convention in 1972, which extended this prohibition to signatories (pretty much every country on earth) and which a number of signatories (Russia, Iran, North Korea, South Africa, etc.) ignored with varying degrees of boldness and which a few countries (most notably Israel) declined to sign entirely.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      While Japan did do a lot of research into biological warfare, the actual application was limited. It's generally a bad idea to spread a bunch of diseases into territories that your troops would eventually march into, so biological warfare was mostly for defensive actions. Unironically it was mostly just moronic chinks doing it, and when it inevitably backfired, they would blame it on Japan for international sympathy points. The Chinese were excellent at killing their own people in mass and then blaming it on Japan post war.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Biological warfare was a thing in Medieval times. Guy on your side of a siege dies of plague? Catapult him over the wall.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    OP invented being a super gorilla brown Black personhomosexual

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And you innovated by being even worse

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nothing to my knowledge. It's actually embarassing. Even the Hungarians made a significant invention: the world's first turboprop. The Japs were really only good at doing medical torture experiments.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In 1940s Japanese copied far less aircraft innovations than is still thought, but usually someone had already put those new things into production few years before them.
      Only engine specific thing I could think would be the supercharger system used by J7W1.
      The plane itself was questionable, but the supercharger might have been the best of it's day.
      There was basically two variable speed auxiliary superchargers feeding one conventional supercharger.
      F4U-5 with a very similar system flew after the war and it proved to have very good high altitude performance.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Long Lance Torpedo
    Long range carrier based aircraft (Zeros could make trips nobody else in the world could in 1941)
    Those balloon bombs that made their way to the American mainland, just about
    Significant innovations in Cruiser Submarines
    So mostly it's a case of improving on existing designs and concepts, not inventing brand new things. That's most of the useful part of R&D anyway.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >methamphetamine
    >diesel-engined tanks
    >aircraft-grade aluminum
    >Yagi-Uda antennas
    >anti-ship guided missiles
    >automatic aircraft flaps
    >automatic aircraft fire extinguishing systems
    >knee-mortars
    >amphibious assault ships
    >landing craft ships

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >actually good answer gets ignored
      But yeah, the first amphibious assault ship is a pretty big one

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Adding onto the best comment in this entire thread.
      >Tank infantry telephones
      The Ha-Go's had a button at the rear of the tank that would send a signal to the tank crew so they wouldn't reverse over the infantry behind them. Captured Ha-Go's lead to the Sherman mounting a full phone in 1943.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      assault ships
      craft ships
      these surprised me years ago when I found this out. I though the nips copied the higgins boat somehow, not the other way around

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the Zero was famous for its long range capability. what was the actual combat range?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Mustang tier long

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >germans did most of the heavy lifting

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    December 7 1941 they had about a dozen submarines with scout aircraft. These little buggers would reconnaissance places like Hawaii, Auckland and Sydney

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not technology but rather breakthroughs in science and chemical warfare and study of the human body for what they did to those poor chinks (ie. Unit 731)

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What technology did japan invent during ww2?
    Relevant technologies that Americans stole from Japanese and are still used today:
    1. 7075 aluminum alloy
    2. Pyrotechnically initiated ammunition (PGU-28A/B)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >stole
      Conquered, nipnop.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >germans did most of the heavy lifting
    Did they?
    Brits got radar, radio navigation, radio triangulation, the jet engine, the first electric computer.
    The US got gun stabilization and nukes.
    The only thing I can think of that the Germans actually got was rocket turbopumps.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The US got gun stabilization and nukes.
      And VT fuses, and B-29.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The US got gun stabilization and nukes.
      proximity fuses was by far the most devastating in practical conventional war. Including for nipps who commented on the uncannily accurate AA fire burgers had

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Assault rifles, submarines that were designed to be primarily submerged and arguably the MBT concept with the E series although they didn’t produce any

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No one invents shit it all exists in the interconnected global conscious and is picked when riped
    It has always exist

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_aircraft_carrier
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=gxyk84t4Q8w&t=346s

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The I-400s were absolute doodoo wastes of steel.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The concept was dumb, but the sheer size of the sub was impressive in of itself. So much so that America sunk all the ones they captured to prevent the Soviets from getting any via war reparations.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Here is HMS M2 sometime between 1925, and 1932,

      Over a decade prior to the I-400 class.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Good aerial torpedos, japs had probably the only decent interwar aerial torpedo in that it actually worked and could be dropped above stall speed
    They also had the Ke-Go IR homing anti-shipping bomb, but I'm not sure if the seeker is a derivative from german research (it also didnt actually work)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >IR homing anti-shipping bomb
      The only working IR homing bomb that was actually deployed was made by Americans and used against Japanese factories in the late ww2.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the Long Lance torpedo was pretty good actually
      good torpedo tech in general, as says

      japan were leaders in torpedo technology and night fighting tactics at the start of the war
      the battle of savo island was a rare moment the japanese got to use their night fighting to its fullest extent and pulled a one-sided victory
      japanese optical gunnery was also top notch, anecdotes have claimed that the yamato had superior optical sights to any existing allied ships, though this cant be verified due to lack of access to them and the secrecy surrounding the yamatos construction

      not really advanced, per se, but highly novel and effective was the knee mortar
      a tiny mortar that could be wrapped around your leg (dont actually fire it from your leg)
      they were issued as the primary indirect fire weapon of infantry platoons and were effective at providing lightweight and portable firepower to platoons

      >knee mortar
      just a cutdown 2-inch mortar

      Night fighting on land and sea. 'Knee mortars' getting issued widely. A very nice magazine fed LMG, possibly the best in class.

      [...]
      Extensive use in China, and probably the one actual deterrent against Soviets making a move earlier. If they were serious about wining after Midway these had to come into play as fast as possible, preferably on port cities via the I-400 hybrid subs (which Yamamoto wanted at the start of any hostilities to take out the Panama Canal & do brush fire raids up the Pacific coast).

      >'Knee mortars' getting issued widely
      >shittiest logistics nation of WW2 adopts most logistic-heavy platoon design

      japan were leaders in torpedo technology and night fighting tactics at the start of the war
      the battle of savo island was a rare moment the japanese got to use their night fighting to its fullest extent and pulled a one-sided victory
      japanese optical gunnery was also top notch, anecdotes have claimed that the yamato had superior optical sights to any existing allied ships, though this cant be verified due to lack of access to them and the secrecy surrounding the yamatos construction

      not really advanced, per se, but highly novel and effective was the knee mortar
      a tiny mortar that could be wrapped around your leg (dont actually fire it from your leg)
      they were issued as the primary indirect fire weapon of infantry platoons and were effective at providing lightweight and portable firepower to platoons

      >night fighting tactics
      the RN did better at Cape Matapan than the Japs did at Savo Island, arguably

      >germans did most of the heavy lifting
      Did they?
      Brits got radar, radio navigation, radio triangulation, the jet engine, the first electric computer.
      The US got gun stabilization and nukes.
      The only thing I can think of that the Germans actually got was rocket turbopumps.

      Germans got self-propelled artillery, a good tank chassis (Panzer IV), and the world's first CAS doctrine

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They had some of the best looking uniforms

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    all those little things that go unnoticed in the complex machine knows as captial ships. From aircraft carriers to battleships nipps were a formidable force in asia all the way until Midway

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    World's first intercontinental weapon: the Fu-go balloon bomb.
    It was a complete flop and only served to kill six civilians.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Weren't four of those a family who died in a house fire after it hit a power line and the other two a pair of hikers who found a crashed one and detonated it by accident?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Nah, it was a church group going on a Sunday hike. Blew up the pastor's wife and a few kids iirc.

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A couple people have mentioned it but no one said any specifics, did all the suffering and "research" at unit 731 turn up anything valuable?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Development and practical use of biological weapons, rest was just R&R and personal curiosity

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty sure their research was used post-war for some medical advances.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've heard that the reason we know so much about the effects of extreme cold on the human bodt is because of unit 731

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      some useful insights into how to counter hypothermia and avoid limb loss from frost bites

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What technology did japan invent during ww2?
    Death rays
    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/instant-articles/ku-go-japans-top-secret-weapon.html

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Safety standards.
    people meme about 731 and their bioweapons, but a lot of what was happening was seeing just how much of various things it took to kill a person via pressure, shock, smoke, fire, bullets, grenades, dehydration etc.
    They were testing the exact variations by fricking blood type in some cases.

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Don't really remember but didn't they develop some medicine or modern medical procedures after the experiments at unit 731?

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know how relevant this is, but the NTMJ report largely dismisses japanese inventions, and points out an institutional lack of research in the Navy and Army.

    They do point out that the IJN did have a very good system of reporting back how equipment perfomrned in action and encouraged the submission of suggestions for improvements and ideas.
    They generally failed to act on those suggestions due to lack of industrial capabilities.

    The one thing the IJN had that nobody else thought of was essentially a light-based telephone. They took a searchlight, used a bulb in the non-visible spectrum and transmitted analog voice as the beam.
    The reciever took the pulsing of the beam and turned it into a prety scratchy but intelligle audio.
    You obviously had to point the beam at the target, and the receiver at the sending ship. It obviously worked in darknes, and could have given the IJN a comuications advantage in night fighting early in the war, but the system was only in a prototype stage in '45.
    ANd yeah, radar-wise the IJN was years behind the curve.

    On a slightly unrelated note, the NTMG report practically shits a brick in the section where they inspect the radar detection and RDF gear on Prinz Eugen, and they point out that this system would be able to rapidly detect, triangulate and range the position of ships that constantly operate their air search radar, like the radar picket DDs were doing in the Pacific.
    Luckily, the IJN never got their copy of that gear.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Oh, I forgot. They also point out that IJN weatehr prediction was apparently as good as or better then on the Allied side. They judged that to be important during the opening stages of the war.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Where can I learn more about this light telephone? That's absolutely fascinating

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not him.

        Aka photophone, relatively common and (N)IR telegraph was tested during WWI iirc

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photophone
        https://www.usni.org/magazines/naval-history-magazine/2021/december/restoring-usc-3-infrared-signaling-telescope
        https://web.archive.org/web/20211022155909/http:/www.bluehaze.com.au/modlight/GrothArticle1.htm
        https://www.bonhams.com/auction/21651/lot/87/lichtsprecher-lispr80-infra-red-voice-signal-transmitter-circa-1937-11-14-in-285-cm-length-of-scope/

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    D.r.a.g.o.n

  33. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > I know the germans did most of the heavy lifting
    Yeah, Hans did most of the fighting in China and the Pacific.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Without the German mission to China the war might have taken a different turn.

  34. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    PAGODA

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Kek I remember sinking this goofy dastardly in Silent Hunter 4. Wtf were those nips thinking?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Wtf were those nips thinking?
        Probably thinking pretty well because the higher you are, the further you can see. Unless you're a flat earth disinfo gay.
        They also contained other equipment such as radar, directors, etc.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Wtf were those nips thinking?
        same as everybody else

        Jap ships just look spindly because they generally had less cluttered decks

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Also specifically with Fuso and Yamashiro, the stacked looking pagoda was essential because they were so limited on deck space with P turret immediately behind the foremast, you can't expand outwards, only up.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The Colorados were at least rebuilt and refitted like 3 times

  35. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bolt on pontoons (IMO this should be used today) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_2_Ka-Mi

    also a range of armored and heavy armed landing barges that US troops were jealous of.

    Full flat top flat tops (IMO should be used today, for reasons)
    multi level launching deck carrier. IIRC one of their big carriers originally had THREE flight decks for launching.
    midget subs

    hybrid battlecruiser-carrier

    cargo subs

    knee mortar

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >pontoons (IMO this should be used today
      they are
      >Full flat top flat tops (IMO should be used today, for reasons)
      why?
      >multi level launching deck carrier
      not solely a Jap invention, all three major navies had multi-deck carriers about the same time

  36. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    shallow water air dropped torpedoes with break away water wings.

    that is how they sank every battleship at Pearl Harbor where air torp attack was considered impossible.

  37. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    SAW concept with the Type 11 LMG
    >hopper fed mg that takes ammo bundled in arisaka clips
    >fellow riflemen can give their stripper clips to the gunner directly without assembling/loading belts

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Except by being hopper-fed you can't move and shoot with it and it needs a dedicated loader

  38. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They developed the idea of concentrating your aircraft carriers to form an unbeatable strike force.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They also developed the idea of losing every fleet carrier in the strike force in a single battle!

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        no, they forgot their own idea
        they sent two to Wake and were lucky; they sent two to Coral Sea and both were hammered enough to be absent at Midway

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          at that period of time in the war, a 2-carrier coordinated strike could be relied upon to devastate most task forces, so more than 4 carriers was frankly overkill

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            japan wasn ever going to win a real war with the US, they knew this
            their plan was to aggressively destroy any US fleet sent to stop them at an early enough point when this was still possibly to cow the US into negotiations
            so they needed to ensure they destroyed each US carrier as fast as possible while losing as few of their own as possible

            as a hyper-simplified example:
            so if the US had 4 carriers and the japanese had 4 carriers, but the US had 2 in the atlantic and 2 in the pacific
            then sending the 4 carriers they had to destroy the 2 the US had would ensure the 2 in the atlantic wouldnt dare sail into the pacific because it went from parity to inferiority
            but if they sent 2 carriers to fight 2 carriers in a relatively even fight, they risk losing at least 1 of them and reducing their local advantage afterwards

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              I'm familiar with the Decisive Battle strategy and so on

              what I'm saying is that it's not a numbers game, in the sense of seeking a straight-line quantitative advantage. 100 aircraft did not automatically beat 70 aircraft.

              all three major navies entered WW2 reckoning that 1) the bomber would always get through, and 2) it took a certain number, something like 10 to 15 torpedoes or armour-piercing bombs, to mission-kill a capital ship in one strike. after which, carriers could recover and launch again to finish it off.

              two Japanese carriers could launch 60 to 70 dive and torpedo bombers with CAP. the priority was to kill carriers, and they knew how many carriers the USN and RN had. thus, even just 2 carriers could expect to kill as many as 4 carriers, even if they encountered a superior enemy task force.

              these calculations factored into the decisions of how many aircraft each design of carrier would operate, for all the navies.

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