What is the worst environment for a soldier to be in?

Deserts? Swamps? Etc

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was more comfortable in Afghanistan and Iraq compared to Fort Polk, Louisiana JRTC fricking sucks.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Uhh it’s fort Johnson now chud

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >renamed after a posthumous Medal of Honor recipient
        I would be rolling in my grave if someone put my name on that place.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The most miserable experience I've ever had was during a CALFEX in December. Nothing but pouring rain in 30 degree weather for 4 days straight.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Urban

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jungle ez

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this.
      tropical climate like in the Amazon is the worst, your clothes get wet and it never dry.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    anywhere with a lot of snow

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This.

      Arctic conditions fricking suck.

      Frick fort wainwright

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You are not trained well enough. Swamps rot your feet and have poisonous plants, bugs, critters and the water is filthy. Artic has a few predators, plenty of water and you can move on skis. They should let the Finns and Swedes train you. You must be Southern boys.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I was trained in the artic
          I was taught to wrestle a white bear
          I was tuggling up with my battle buddy
          I was the motherfricker you sent to kill the white spike's queen

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I was tugging my battle buddy

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Arctic is only tolerable when you're actually fighting in it. All other moments, especially when you're trying to get some fricking sleep, are where it sucks the most dick.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I sleep better in my sleeping bag in a 10 man artic tent up north on exercise then I do in my bed at home. I think it's because after hauling a sled all day I'm extremely tired, that and the fumes from the Coleman lantern and stove

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Hello fellow leaf. You had a better experience than us because said lantern and stove went out every 5 fricking seconds and the constant blizzards made everything fricking soaked on top of already being cold

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          have you ever even been camping?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Arctic kills you in 20 minutes if you fall asleep.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          homie has never slept outside colder than 75°

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          This. In terms of freedom of movement and environment difficulty, cold weather and even montane and arctic conditions are actually not the most difficult to operate in, even deep (1m+) snow. The most difficult is extremely dense forest with swamp or wetland conditions. Given the trends in ukraine, swampy and muddy terrain with poor line of sight conditions is your worst enemy, even if you're just chilling in your muddy hovel you're just waiting to get a grenade dropped on your head by a chink drone with FLIR that you didn't hear or see.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Artic isn't that bad if you know what youre doing

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          what about antarctic

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No sure, is it that different from artic?

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Like the arctic but for ants

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You are not trained well enough. Swamps rot your feet and have poisonous plants, bugs, critters and the water is filthy. Artic has a few predators, plenty of water and you can move on skis. They should let the Finns and Swedes train you. You must be Southern boys.

          Bud, I'm raised Alaskan, and got stationed at wainwright for God knows what reason. The occasional foot injury from swamp feet or bugs, is nothing compared to how quickly frostbite sets in. You've never slept in -35 and it shows.

          Funnily enough we did train with the finns. Two major differences between us and them. They are allowed to start fires for warmth, and they pack light while moving, they intend to move 16 miles per day on skis. Whereas we carry everything with us at all times instead of setting up a pseudo FOB, or a legit patrol base.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >they pack light while moving, they intend to move 16 miles per day on skis. Whereas we carry everything with us at all times instead of setting up a pseudo FOB, or a legit patrol base.

            That's just how things was in the year of our lord 2000 before GWOT set in.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >They are allowed to start fires for warmth

            How do you dry your stuff? There's some time and temperature related details in moisture management without fire, I'm interested in knowing how others do it.

            t. finn

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              We have 10 man tents, with diesel stoves and whisper light backups. Similar to pic related often enough, but most of the sleds aren't that nice. They are the old fiberglass sleds from the 70s most of the time.

              The sled weighs around 150 lbs. Has a tent, pioneering equipment, a heavy diesel stove, and normally 10 gallons of jet fuel rated down to -40.

              If we want to dry anything, it has to be over night in the tent. Provided the heater works, and we were allowed to turn it on. I've had plenty of cold nights. Thing is the tents are made with kerosene, so they burn down in 10 seconds flat if a fire starts inside.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >for actual combat
    Urban
    >day to day life
    Any extreme environment. Desert and arctic are equally bad. Freezing within minutes is arguably more merciful than cooking across a few hours, but death is death.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Being wet is terrible for you. Very easy to get sick.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends
    >Good logistics chain
    Swamp
    >Bad logistics chain
    Arctic

    You'll become a casualty in a swamp pretty quick whether from disease or through the moisture.
    Arctic will kill you once the fuel runs out and boy do Arctic operations consume fuel at an insane rate.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think swamp isn't as bad as desert or arctic. It is miserable, but it is mostly a solved problem if you don't let any red tape get in the way. Dump DDT on everything and you're fine.
      >but it's toxic
      No it isn't, frick off.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        But the birdies

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >muh red tape
        Ya that’s reality though

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          DDT being banned because some b***h wrote a book that is provably false is not "reality".

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think swamp isn't as bad as desert or arctic. It is miserable, but it is mostly a solved problem if you don't let any red tape get in the way. Dump DDT on everything and you're fine.
      >but it's toxic
      No it isn't, frick off.

      You are not trained well enough. Swamps rot your feet and have poisonous plants, bugs, critters and the water is filthy. Artic has a few predators, plenty of water and you can move on skis. They should let the Finns and Swedes train you. You must be Southern boys.

      Swamps. Basically inland Florida during the summer would be awful. Trench foot rates would be debilitating.

      I've spent a lot of time walking around flatwoods and swamps. As long as you watch out for gators, snakes, and wildlife. You'll be fine. Just change your socks and maybe have a spare pair of boots, or do what US GIs did in Vietnam and don't wear socks. There are still dry islands, or worst case you can carry a hammock.

      Personally I like the heat and swamps. Feeling the warm water and mud around your feet and legs is pleasant, and relaxing.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Moisturized, refreshed and in your lane, right anon?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Swamps aren't that bad. I love the feeling of mud around my feet and legs.
        We need to ban goblins from /k/.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I bet you were the kind of kid to piss in the bath/pool

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        t. frog

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, desert and arctic put a strain in logistics and are lethal if logistics fail, but they can be managed you are properly equipped and supplied. But swamp/jungle suck no matter what.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Tf are you talking about. Arctic and desert logistics are cakewalks compared to jungle and swamp logistics.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    at home with the wife

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      real shit

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Damn man im trying to destress after work

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Poor Ausbros

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swamps. Basically inland Florida during the summer would be awful. Trench foot rates would be debilitating.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The mangrove swamps in the upper Keys and the Everglades. Absolutely the most difficult climate for the unknowing in the world.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've heard that tunnels absolutely suck ass.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I've heard that tunnels absolutely suck ass.
      I would rather live in the swamp than try to clue Củ Chi

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ive thought long about this concept, the worst place to wage war. I'll list every one that Ive heard as the worst:
    >the desert because hot, sand, long sight lines
    >urban because angles and close engagement distances
    >forest because short sight lines and difficult to entrench
    >tropical jungle because short sight lines, disease, critters, hot
    >artic because cold and hard to move around in gear
    >muddy fields because mud sucks
    >sea battles because giant floating coffin and drowning, fire, starvation
    >aerial fighting because angles and escaping crashing planes is hard
    Ive just come to the conclusion that all war sucks, no matter where it is

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      tl:dr
      >war is hell
      I think that's been established.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Ive just come to the conclusion that all war sucks, no matter where it is
      Wow, so deep& impactful, anon, thank you for the unique insight

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Anywhere hot and humid like jungles, swamps, etc. Arctic and desert conditions can be gradually dealt with via exposure to it, and basically boil down to keep yourself warm or cool and stay hydrated, which won’t be an issue in a first world military with first world logistics and even then with proper training can be dealt with as well in worst case scenarios. But the fricking swamps, that shit will rot your flesh and is just filled with all sorts of nasty critters eager to give you a bite and thats not even talking disease. Add in poor lines of sight regardless if you’re attacking or defending, mud, and close quarters combat, and IMO you’re looking at the second worst type of terrain to fight in, first being urban for obvious reasons that have been discussed to death.

      lmfao

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you captain reddit

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In the desert you can die from hypothermia as well. It can be 100 degrees during the day and 25 at night. If youre drenched in sweat during the day you may die at night. It happened to one of the SAS operatives during bravo two zero

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    they all suck in their own way
    war sucks

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I never served but having to thread on waist deep mud water has got to SUCK big time, how long after doing the aforementioned do you have to dry yourself before the trench-foot kicks in?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you are only dry after endex

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Urban in hot climates

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For me its the mountains in the winter. Very cold, you have to shed PPE, getting supply and CASEVAC is much harder.

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A moist environment when it's just slightly above freezing would fricking blow.
    Wait, how cold can swamps get?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like costal North Carolina in the winter. It's not too bad IMO. The Falklands is also much like you describe. A damp, and cold (if mostly above freezing) environment.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Space.

  19. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Swamps or jungles easy. Anything hot and wet is gonna be rife with heat cases, infections, bugs, all that shit. It's hot and wet and full of wildlife hell bent on fricking with you.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Swamps or jungles easy. Anything hot and wet is gonna be rife with heat cases, infections, bugs, all that shit. It's hot and wet and full of wildlife hell bent on fricking with you.
      Humans in general seem to be more willing to live in jungles than in the arctic

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Brown ppl aren't human

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      swamps
      jungles
      arctic
      high alpine cold temps
      urban

  20. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depending on level of support, swamp (high support) or arctic (minimal support)

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    swamps, doesn't matter what you do, what tricks you got, your socks will get wet.

  22. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    garrison

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That sign looks so depressing

  23. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cold+wet
    snow

  24. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tropical rainforest for sure.

    >rain every day in the monsoon season
    >250% humidity
    >deadly snakes, bugs, leopards/tigers, angry natives with bows
    >amazing tropical diseases like malaria, typhoid, dengue fever, blood flukes, river blindness, chagas, sleeping sickness, yaws, hookworm, mossman ulcers, whipworm, guinea-worm, rat fever, roundworms, yellow fever etc.
    >perfect conditions for ambushes and tripwires
    >have to choose between mosquitos and terrain thicker than a 70s bush or having cancer causing herbicides and pesticides dropped on you. Not to mention sketchy anti-malarias.

    The high arctic would be a close 2nd but at least you aren't at risk of bleeding out your eyes, having a parasite in your brain and having the worst livery destroying jungle fevers imaginable possibly all at the same time.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >yaws
      >oh boy I’ve never heard of that disease before, I’m going to loo…oh, that is unpleasant
      Living in the tropics is hell with a nice view.

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What is the worst environment for a soldier to be in?

    in an actual war

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    beach landing
    >D-day

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Reminder that the Allies took more casualties in training for the operation than they did storming two of the beaches.

  27. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jungle / swamp
    >40 C
    >100% humidity
    >everything is venomous
    >there are things in the water that will swim up your urethra and clamp on
    >there are things in the trees that can silently take one of you out before the others can raise their muzzles
    >you cannot change your socks fast enough
    >you cannot see more than 5 feet in front of you

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      -30°c with some wind chill could kill you in a couple hours if you aren't equipped for it, any uncovered skin would get frost bite with in a hour, building up a sweat could be a death sentence, good luck sleeping btw

      As some one who lives close to the Arctic Circle i would take heat over cold any day of the week if I'm forced to be outside, better that I'm uncomfortable then dead

  28. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Uhm....

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also: Close second

  29. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Peace time.

  30. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What is the worst environment for a soldier to be in?
    Car dealership or casino

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Underrated

  31. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe inside a burning car

  32. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Papua New Guinea

  33. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >long lectures
    >mandatory DEI training
    >casinos (when you have money)
    >strip joints (when you have money)
    >the BC's daughter's bedroom when he gets home
    >Tijuana when drunk

  34. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Piss test after block leave.

  35. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Steppe with chechen troops behind you

  36. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Arctic & Subarctic Muskeg.

    Any other answer is wrong.
    If you think otherwise it's because you don't actually know what Muskeg is.

  37. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Home

  38. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the torpedo room when the poopoo pump smokes a bearing

  39. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Dudes who did jungle training telling their stories cracked me the frick up there's no way that shit is worth living through

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      tell the stories

  40. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To actually fight a war? Arctic. Any serious foe will be making liberal use of thermal, cant light a fire, needless casualties because IV bags freeze, cant exert yourself because sweat is death so every movement takes twice as long and uses twice the resources, literally nothing around to scavenge if supplies run low. Plus body armor fricks with thermoregulation (something to do with the weight meaning no air pockets making you colder), so most people aren't going to be wearing it which means a lot of casualties that wouldn't happen in temperate conditions. Certainly extreme heat shares the inverse of a lot of these issues, but I think some of them can be mitigated where in arctic conditions you just have to live with it. If you remain static and hydrated in shade, extreme heat wont outright kill you; whereas if you remain static and hydrated in extreme cold you're slowly dying the whole time.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >extreme heat (dry)
      Water and shade.

      >extreme cold (only 5-6 months of the year max even in arctic Alaska and Canada)
      Correct clothing and modern tech has made this a cakewalk compared to what it used to be. And many boreal armies in the world have zero issues operating in extreme cold (down to about -40C) in terms of mobility, because as with most war zones infantry mobility is mechanized. And mechanized equipments' biggest foe in terms of terrain is actually dense mud and unstable slopes.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This, cold is always better then heat. You can keep adding layers in cold, but in heat you can't take layers off. I can be happy and warm in -40C with enough layers. I will never be happy in +40C and humity

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          tell that to office b***hes everywhere.

  41. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    volcano

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Came here to post this
      Not sure why anyone would fight inside or next to an erupting volcano, let alone on foot, but dammit if it's not the worst place you could possibly get in a gunfight

      what about antarctic

      No concealment or cover except in mountainous/rocky regions. Also, logistics are significantly more challenging.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Not sure why anyone would fight inside or next to an erupting volcano
        For the freedom of Middle-Earth.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I’m already prepared

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Came here to post this
      Not sure why anyone would fight inside or next to an erupting volcano, let alone on foot, but dammit if it's not the worst place you could possibly get in a gunfight
      [...]
      No concealment or cover except in mountainous/rocky regions. Also, logistics are significantly more challenging.

      But if you have the high ground you can't lose.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      HoW AbOuT On ThE frickiNg SuN?

  42. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tropical marshes/swamps during peak of summer

  43. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    At least if the Chinese ever invade Australia our fricked up environment will kill a lot of them. Also good luck to them trying to occupy placed like Townsville and Alice Springs. The local indigenous youth will be hooning around in stolen Chinese military vehicles.

  44. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Garrison. The dead get burred they hand out a medal and make a show for the living. Life goes on as normal. Nothing ever changes.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I should delete that I'm old and fat and can still b***h. I'd b***h about any terrain. The worse is what you have to life with if you live.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yawn. Go be an irrelevant b***h somewhere else.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I will lad, just waiting for your mum to be single.

  45. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My dad used to be a LRRP man in Finland, and went on a UN peacekeeping mission to Egypt/Sinai and Cyprus.
    So he's got some experience from lots of different climates.

    Here's some things he has said:
    1) proper arctic winter is easier than you'd think. Because while it's cold, it's also dry. All you really have to do is to stay warm, and that you can do with many different ways. Proper layered clothing (which you can add to and take away according to level of activity), making small fires, and just physical activity (keep moving) to keep warm. The downside is that you burn a shit-ton of calories. A day-long ski-march through a wilderness in full combat gear can burn up to 8000 kcal per day. It's hard to simply eat enough to keep up with that consumption.

    2) Tropic heat is a lot more taxing than arctic cold, because you can't really escape it. The heat and humidity is EVERYWHERE, and you just keep sweating like a horse. You can drink 5 litres a day and your piss is still coffee colored.

    3) Absolute worst condition is sub-arctic forest (Finland/Canada/siberia level) on autumn. It rains constantly so every part of your gear is wet, and will NOT get dry even if hung up on tent next to your stove. The temperatures are just above freezing point during day, but dip into freezing on nights. So you are constantly in danger of hypothermia. Your feet and fingers are always wet and cold and practically impossible to keep warm and dry. Which leads to sickness, headaches and general misery. Whatever fires you make will smoke like hell and give out your location. You will glow like a beakon in thermals due to difference between body heat and ambient temperature. The nights in the wilderness are just that kind of pitch black that seem to suck all light into it like a void, so no amount of light source seems to be enough. It's easier for the enemy to spot you than for you to see 10 meters in front of you.
    It's just wet, cold, dark misery 24/7.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >3) Absolute worst condition is sub-arctic forest (Finland/Canada/siberia level) on autumn. It rains constantly so every part of your gear is wet, and will NOT get dry even if hung up on tent next to your stove.
      Have you considered changing your socks tho?

  46. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The more mosquitos it has, the worse it is.

  47. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There was a thread with old quotes about mud from WW1 a while ago. They made it sound like a strong candidate for the worst place to fight.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I assume you mean Passchendaele where some areas the mud was so gloopy that it acted like quicksand and if you fell off a duckboard not even 3 or 4 men could pull you out. They started just shooting guys who got stuck due to all of all the guys stuck in the mud alive for days.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/qMnxlY4.jpeg

        [...]

        >It was a nightmare, because all you had was a couple of duckboards side by side and either side of it was about ten feet of mud with the top of a tank sticking out of it here and there. If you fell off, it would take a traction engine to pull you out, almost. It was that deep – it was absolute sucking mud.

        >We had a gun knocked out almost the moment we moved into our battle positions for the Passchendaele barrages. Later on, a damaged gun of ours we tried to send back to ordnance – it vanished into the mud of an unseen shell hole and for all I know it is still there.

        >It was mud, mud, everywhere: mud in the trenches, mud in front of the trenches, behind the trenches. Every shell hole was a sea of filthy oozing mud. I was tired of seeing infantry sinking back in that morass never to come out alive again. I was tired of all the carnage, of all the sacrifice that we had there just to gain about twenty-five yards. And there were many days when actually I don’t remember them; I don’t remember what happened because I was so damned tired. The fatigue in that mud was something terrible. It did get you and you reached a point where there was no beyond, you just could not go any further. And that’s the point I’d reached.

        This was probably one of them but there were several

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I assume you mean Passchendaele where some areas the mud was so gloopy that it acted like quicksand and if you fell off a duckboard not even 3 or 4 men could pull you out. They started just shooting guys who got stuck due to all of all the guys stuck in the mud alive for days.

      >It was a nightmare, because all you had was a couple of duckboards side by side and either side of it was about ten feet of mud with the top of a tank sticking out of it here and there. If you fell off, it would take a traction engine to pull you out, almost. It was that deep – it was absolute sucking mud.

      >We had a gun knocked out almost the moment we moved into our battle positions for the Passchendaele barrages. Later on, a damaged gun of ours we tried to send back to ordnance – it vanished into the mud of an unseen shell hole and for all I know it is still there.

      >It was mud, mud, everywhere: mud in the trenches, mud in front of the trenches, behind the trenches. Every shell hole was a sea of filthy oozing mud. I was tired of seeing infantry sinking back in that morass never to come out alive again. I was tired of all the carnage, of all the sacrifice that we had there just to gain about twenty-five yards. And there were many days when actually I don’t remember them; I don’t remember what happened because I was so damned tired. The fatigue in that mud was something terrible. It did get you and you reached a point where there was no beyond, you just could not go any further. And that’s the point I’d reached.

  48. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I used to dig trenches in one of my previous jobs to lay electrical conduit. If we couldn't get a mini-excavator on site, we had to use pickaxes and shovels for the entire project. After about 5 feet down and depending on the location, the bottom of the trench would would fill up with ground water and/or rain and the rest of the digging was a nightmare. Trench foot is no joke. My feet would get so raw that I could easily scrape and peel off my skin if I tried. It felt like they were melting.
    Wet boots, wet clothing, wetness in general; humidity, heat; mosquitoes, spiders, bugs; filth, limited mobility from mud, etc. I haven't been in extreme heat or extreme cold environments but it can't possibly be worse.
    Watching shootout footage where brazilian police take on favela monkeys in urban settings looks pretty shitty too. Plenty of cover and concealment but you are stalemated the entire time because bullets are whizzing everywhere. Swamps are hell but I think I still prefer them over the exponentially higher chances of getting shot in urban environments

    On an unrelated note, picrel with some good kneepads and gloves is great for digging. 10/10 highly recommend. The glock e-tool is okay too, but I still had to retighten the cog every so often since the head would loosen after prolonged use. The pointed head, longer handle are nice and it folds up really compact but the SF shovel is a tank. I've easily moved several tons of dirt with it literally

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > use pickaxes and shovels
      Are you from Tajikistan by chance?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The old fashioned ways never fail

  49. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What is the worst environment for a soldier to be in?
    Your mom

  50. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Do soldiers get high in the field sometimes?
    It’s not Vietnam anymore.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Everyone is on nicotine and a bunch are on pills.
      >Inb4 : Nicotine is not a drug!
      Boiling a can of chew down and having someone ingest it will give them a fatal overdose.

  51. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Least Bad Environment for fighting: Aegean Islands (Mediterranean)

    pros
    >pleasant weather
    >beautiful local women
    >great swimming
    >incredible food
    >easy rescue if shot down or sunk
    >can read your pocket Aenid/Illiad during the campaign
    >no bad diseases
    >gorgeous scenery

    Cons
    >island hopping, anything that isn't strategic maneuver warfare is an uphill slog against an entrenched opponent
    >critters
    >anything not naval based will be a bloodbath
    >Turks

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      depends on what island, many islands are dry and therefore there aren't many places to hide, only entrenched positions and shelters will work. If the island is successfuly blockaded, you're automatically ded in these modern warfare scenarios

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fresh water might get scarce there too

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          taking an island is a b***h but defending it is a b***h as well. Logistics burn you up

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that's why Arma 3 is Mediterranean

  52. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    I've heard of soldiers in Afghanistan (ISAF ones not the local) getting high in FOBs on opium but modern drug testing and shit kind of makes it extremely uncommon hence the use of spice. Although opiates don't last in piss very long so I'm sure it goes under the wire but its not the 70s anymore.

    Things like pic related are more common.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Alcohol was fricking crazy common in Afghanistan. You'd just have people from the states mail you soda boozes full of booze. Nobody checks.

  53. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Submarines are up there. Primarily because in an actual conflict you are the primary target, ableit arguably after carriers. Secondly because if you are a soldier on a sub shit has gone real sideways.

  54. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    PrepHole.

  55. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    mountainous jungle
    you get the worst of everything there. you get the difficulty of movement and logistics of the mountains with all the horrific moisture, humidity, disease, and wildlife of a jungle.
    example: the Kokoda Track in Papua New Guinea in WWII

  56. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Northeastern britain during early spring or autumn.

  57. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  58. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Flooded jungle tunnels.

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