What did I do wrong?

Devastated actually. I grouted my tiles with a mid grey grout. First part I did a few weeks ago and I was afraid it was drying out too quick so I kept spraying it as it was drying. It turned out streaky. This time, I just let it dry and 36 hours later it’s crumbly and dusty. What the frick?? How can I fix all this? I wouldn’t even know how to apply it correctly now.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > streaky
    Ahh, this explains the problem. Grout is supposed to go between tiles, not on top of them.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      [...]

      No you’re misunderstanding… the cloudy layer on the surface wipes off ok. It’s the grout lines between the tiles that are fricked up. They are patchy in colour and crumbly

      • 3 weeks ago
        Kevin Van Dam

        Did you use the right grout? There’s sanded and unsanded. Sanded is for bigger gaps, unsanded for small stuff. Youtube goyim I followed says he did like 50/50 mix and I did that plus the liquid sealer after it dried and mine was ok.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The gap is 2mm. I’m not sure if there was sand in the mix, don’t think so but I’ll look into it. I didn’t know you had to apply sealer as well…

          Also how it’s crumbling like that on the top and that gap, to my armchair handyman eye who has done one tile job, it looks like your grout mix was way too dry and/or you used sanded grout with granules too thick for those gaps. Like you had air pockets and not enough wet sloppy grout forced into the gap.

          If (as your post suggests) you grouped it once and then went back over it days later then that would account for the second application flaking and crumbling.

          The whole point is to pack the gaps with material and you do it in steps timed to get it in, then after it cures (not "dries") a bit you can go back over it with a damp sponge to get uniform grout line surface smoothness, then after a bit more curing to gain strength and resistance to tearing out you can buff off the haze and and bits of grout that are on the face of the tile.

          The big chunked out part in your pic looks like imroperly mixed grout, either with dry spots where it didn't mix, or where air got trapped in it by overaggressive and premature stirring, maybe both.

          Just read up on how it's done and follow the directions and do t overtime k and second guess it.

          The particles were very fine, I used enough water and it was well mixed. It seems to have just crumbled because it dried in like 30 mins instead of curing. So it’s packed powder in the gaps. The tiles are terracotta and I think they absorbed too much of the water.
          I grouted a different area before and although it was streaky, I pre wet the tile edges and wet it as it was curing and at least it cured instead of crumbling.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Two things-

            2mm is a very fine grout line and even when done right there's not much mass there to give any strength to a material that's not super string to begin with. Also sounds like you used unsanded grout which is even weaker and wants to sit well down in a groove between glazed tiles with very uniform edge levels.

            Also, terra cotta and similarly porous tiles should be soaked before installation; it can't hurt and can vastly improve bond strength and avoid sucking moisture out of the materials. If you have to wait between mortar and grouting so that they dry out, mist the grout lines with a spray bottle before grouting

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Yeah I’m thinking it was the terracotta fricked me. I’m getting conflicting advice about using sanded or unsanded grout so not sure what to do. I think I used unsanded. It just said polymer and cement based. It there any way to reapply grout if I were to half remove the current installation?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the acid guy is just a spammer

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >the acid guy is just a spammer

          the acid guy is just a stupid child

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Kevin Van Dam

    Also how it’s crumbling like that on the top and that gap, to my armchair handyman eye who has done one tile job, it looks like your grout mix was way too dry and/or you used sanded grout with granules too thick for those gaps. Like you had air pockets and not enough wet sloppy grout forced into the gap.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If (as your post suggests) you grouped it once and then went back over it days later then that would account for the second application flaking and crumbling.

    The whole point is to pack the gaps with material and you do it in steps timed to get it in, then after it cures (not "dries") a bit you can go back over it with a damp sponge to get uniform grout line surface smoothness, then after a bit more curing to gain strength and resistance to tearing out you can buff off the haze and and bits of grout that are on the face of the tile.

    The big chunked out part in your pic looks like imroperly mixed grout, either with dry spots where it didn't mix, or where air got trapped in it by overaggressive and premature stirring, maybe both.

    Just read up on how it's done and follow the directions and do t overtime k and second guess it.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Looks like you didn't use unsanded and bought the cheapest bag of grout they had. We all make this mistake once, enjoy chiseling out all of it and redoing it.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sanded/Unsanded is a red herring.

    You should have sprayed tons of water into the terracotta so your grout doesn't get sucked dry. Like dripping wet. Yo shit ain't bonding cuz it's too dry.

    Also use more, pack it in. I see CAVITY. And seal it you fool. Do you like water behind your tiles? Cause unsealed grout is how you get water behind your tiles.

    Source: Repointed foundation and re-grouted tile.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tile guy here.

    Use a Mapei sanded grout, pretty much always unless you have a sensitive tile that will scratch from the sand.

    I ignore the mix directions and just add water and mix until the consistency is a little bit wetter than peanut butter. Use a mixing drill.

    Then just float it in. make sure to fill all the openings, and then go back with the sponge and water bucket to get all the grout off the tiles. I never do more than 4sq ft before cleaning the area up with the sponge. You always get some haze when it's all done, I like to use damp fresh rags to take that off. usually about an hour after i get all the grout in. work carefully so you don't pull out the fresh grout.

    for your thing, get that haze off first. Then mix up some more grout and just add it into the gaps were you have some missing. Easy fix. And next time be a little more aggressive with your wiping, you left the grout too high. it should be slightly below the tile surface.

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