What camo are these pants?

What camo are these pants?

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250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    RDF. A successor to ERDL.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks, are items in this pattern rare? I have never heard of it before.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Uncommon, but not really "rare" yet. It's the pattern that was used in Grenada when M81 woodland was in its infancy.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The pants in the OP were made by Propper in 1979. I know Propper normally just copies the military, could these possibly be issued pants or just commercial copies from that time peroid?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >normally just copies the military
            Sortish. They are contracted by the military, but they also sell commercial versions of the military uniform on their website/shop along with their own exclusive tactical clothings. Just like with truspec, the main difference is that their commercial shit is not berry compliant, so its made outside of the U.S., at least in the 90s.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Thanks for the insight, I will keep this in mind next time I see Propper at the surp shop. Any sure ways to tell its a contract item?

              If it has a contract number/NSN, its likely issued than commercial

              Picrel is the tag with the NSN. Is it missing a contract number?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The contract number is the numbers at the bottom. Its the DLA shit. You can search up that contract number. You can also tell it was issued based on the NSN too. The contract number shows its been contracted in the late 70s and it likely been issued

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Nice, I knew the DLA meant something when I searched for it but I was only able to find the date code in this case 1979 like you said.

                >Thanks for the insight, I will keep this in mind next time I see Propper at the surp shop
                Not all propper stuff are outsourced, the ones made by federal contracts has to be made within the U.S.. if its commercial, you can easily tell by seeing a tag where its made from(like made in china, honduras or whatever). If it doesn't have it, its likely contracted or been made before they outsourced their shit.

                >if its commercial, you can easily tell by seeing a tag where its made from(like made in china, honduras or whatever). If it doesn't have it, its likely contracted or been made before they outsourced their shit.

                In summary I should look for a contract number and make sure it wasn't made abroad and I'm g2g?

                https://i.imgur.com/GDoc4cj.jpeg

                The contract is the funny numbers outside of the NSN

                Is the year in the contract number the year the item was made or the year the contract was procured? For example the shirt in your picture were they made in 2018 or did the contract for them start in 2018?

                [...]

                Rapid Deployment Force or RDF fatigues were a post-Vietnam modification of the Tropical Combat Uniform fielded from the late-1970s into the 1980s (some uniforms saw use as recently as the US invasion of Panama in 1989). The name stems from the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force, a three-division joint US Army-USMC force activated in 1979 that could be deployed anywhere in the world within 24 hours, with the primary area of responsibility being the Middle East. The RDF was disestablished in 1983 and reorganized as United States Central Command (USCENTCOM).

                >A successor to ERDL.

                Somewhat incorrect, RDF fatigues are considered the final iteration of ERDL before the adoption of BDUs.

                Source: https://www.gear-illustration.com/2020/06/14/story-about-the-rdf-combat-uniform/

                Good info, thanks!

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You're welcome

                Another interesting read would be on this experimental USMC body armor with an ERDL cover based on the "chicken plate" body armor worn by air crews that was developed around 1975.

                https://www.gear-illustration.com/2024/01/01/experimental-marine-corps-fragmentation-small-arms-protective-vest-with-front-plate-body-armor-type-i/

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >In summary I should look for a contract number and make sure it wasn't made abroad and I'm g2g?
                Yup, if you don't want commercial stuff, check and see if it has a NSN number and their contract one too.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Is the year in the contract number the year the item was made or the year the contract was procured? For example the shirt in your picture were they made in 2018 or did the contract for them start in 2018?
                The contract number is the year its been contracted to be made. It can be from 2018 or slightly later than that.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Thanks for the insight, I will keep this in mind next time I see Propper at the surp shop
                Not all propper stuff are outsourced, the ones made by federal contracts has to be made within the U.S.. if its commercial, you can easily tell by seeing a tag where its made from(like made in china, honduras or whatever). If it doesn't have it, its likely contracted or been made before they outsourced their shit.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The contract is the funny numbers outside of the NSN

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >DLA100-79-C-2365
                Contract number says 79 = contract from 1979 ≈ it was made in 1979 = it's real surplus. (lets see if that apprx. equal to symbol works)

                Wait these aren't just fudd knockoff cammies or something? Mother fricker I trashed a ton of these as painting clothes because I got them cheap at the salvo and figured they were just fake m81.

                Frick

                Lol no they aren't knockoffs. They're hard to find IME but I still get 'em for $5/piece every now and then. Talked to a guy wearing some because I wanted to know if he had a place he was getting them from and he turned out to be a Vietnam vet and still had his own stash of ERDL/RDF/whatever. He said he uses them around the house to mow the lawn and stuff. They're in real good condition too lol. Damn near killed me because the only place I could find them was some overpriced collector's shop that wanted $80 for a shirt. Yeah at that price I would be making a potential ~$75/month in new stock just digging through the surplus store's bins when I'm in the area.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >it's real surplus
                Nice, glad I picked them up. Too bad they are manlet sized.
                >They're hard to find IME but I still get 'em for $5/piece every now and then.
                Paid $3.50 for the pants in OP. Are they not worth much more than that yet?

                >In summary I should look for a contract number and make sure it wasn't made abroad and I'm g2g?
                Yup, if you don't want commercial stuff, check and see if it has a NSN number and their contract one too.

                >Yup, if you don't want commercial stuff
                I've always looked down on Propper when I would see the tag because I though all they made was commercial stuff, thank you for proving me wrong.

                https://i.imgur.com/CrcfqB4.jpeg

                >Is the year in the contract number the year the item was made or the year the contract was procured? For example the shirt in your picture were they made in 2018 or did the contract for them start in 2018?
                The contract number is the year its been contracted to be made. It can be from 2018 or slightly later than that.

                >from 2018 or slightly later than that.
                Makes sense, thanks!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If it has a contract number/NSN, its likely issued than commercial

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No such thing as M81 🙂

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/RSRAtll.jpeg

      Uncommon, but not really "rare" yet. It's the pattern that was used in Grenada when M81 woodland was in its infancy.

      Rapid Deployment Force or RDF fatigues were a post-Vietnam modification of the Tropical Combat Uniform fielded from the late-1970s into the 1980s (some uniforms saw use as recently as the US invasion of Panama in 1989). The name stems from the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force, a three-division joint US Army-USMC force activated in 1979 that could be deployed anywhere in the world within 24 hours, with the primary area of responsibility being the Middle East. The RDF was disestablished in 1983 and reorganized as United States Central Command (USCENTCOM).

      >A successor to ERDL.

      Somewhat incorrect, RDF fatigues are considered the final iteration of ERDL before the adoption of BDUs.

      Source: https://www.gear-illustration.com/2020/06/14/story-about-the-rdf-combat-uniform/

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    your pic has me thinking about a minecraft grass texture inspired digital camo

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Picrel is LATPAT being the closest Ive seen to a mincraft patten. Make one anon.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wait these aren't just fudd knockoff cammies or something? Mother fricker I trashed a ton of these as painting clothes because I got them cheap at the salvo and figured they were just fake m81.

    Frick

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They're not knockoffs, but they're still near totally worthless since they were used after Vietnam and in no major "glamorous" wars. Yes, SF/SEAL/Delta/MUHREENS/whatever used them, and you can easily find photos, but even the autistic collectors that specialize in those units won't pay big money for them since they're common and boring.

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