What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?

What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    *could* be a good thing, but due to an overwhelming number of factors well outside of our control, they are not a good thing in the slightest

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Even if the intention and people driving it were 100% trustworthy and benevolent it would still be a horrible idea that will get people senselessly killed. Imagine you or someone you know gets hurt or killed because your gun failed to unlock multiple times because their fingerprints were dirty or the card or chip didn't get a good scan. Imagine cops dying because one of them gets shot down, the partner's gun fails and now the partner can't use the down cop's gun to defend both of them. It's just idiocy trying to prevent stupid already fringe cases of stupidity where some moron with little ass kids for some reason doesn't use a proper gun safe.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Imagine cops dying because one of them gets shot down, the partner's gun fails and now the partner can't use the down cop's gun to defend both of them
        based. Cops should be forced to use these.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Cops should be forced to use these.
          I like this concept in general. Make cops the test bed for all gun control measures. Cali compliant handguns with firing pin micro printing, ARs with bullet buttons and fin stocks, smart guns that track location and time fired, etc. Make them do all of it. And when the inevitable pro cop legislators say "that would put their lives in danger, these guns are ineffective and unfit for purpose!" you go "yeah, exactly, that's the fricking problem."

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >outside of our control
      Not while i still have a dumb-gun it's not

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    friggin cool! I can't wait to connect my gun to the internet so that it can tell me how many rounds i have left in the magazine. I can't wait to LARP like i'm in Cyberpunk 2077!!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I sound and talk like this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Wanna make out?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Wanna make out?

        cute

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/dOJ6FAm.png

      What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?

      the thing is, you could have a more practical "ammo counter" with nixie tubes or something.
      "smart" and "electronic" has become synonymous with this "internet of things" hell system, i guess due to industrial/economic factors.
      but it presents us with the danger of throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
      any technology can be used for more efficient & robust systems which bring dignity and independence. don't let some goomba make you think a specific technology is inherently bad, just because he weaponizes it against you.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      FRICKING THIS

      DUDE i just LOVE my smart internet gun and the hustle and bustle of the big city, it’s so DYNAMIC and makes me feel like i’m in one of my favourite TV SHOWS. you should totally come on down to my studio apartment, it’s got EXPOSED RED BRICK walls and everything, we can crack open a nice hoppy ipa or three and get crazy watching some cartoons on adult swim! and dude, dude, DUDE, we have GOTTA go down to the barcade- listen here, right, it’s a BAR where us ADULTS who do ADULTING can go DRINK. BUT!!!! it’s also an ARCADE like when we were kids, so we can play awesome VIDEO GAMES, without dumb kids bothering us. speaking of which megan and i have finally decided to tie the knot- literally -we’re both getting snipped tomorrow at the hospital, that way we can save money to spent more on ourselves and our FURBABIES. i’m frickin JACKED man, i’m gonna SLAM this craft beer and pop open another one!!!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Hipster man babies and sóyfaced urbanite Black folk *ruined* IPAs and craft brewing in general and I will never forgive them.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It sounds good in general, it would keep unauthorized users from getting their hands on it and misusing it, right? That would be perfectly fine for hobby/recreational shooting. But it very much becomes a problem if you need to use it for self defense.

    Several self defense experts indicate that when the emergency happens you function at about 70% of your worst day performance. This means that you won't be grabbing at the right angle needed to unlock the firearm. Or what if you have gloves on? Biometrics don't read through clothing.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on what you mean by "smart gun" exactly. Are we talking about some kind of safety system where the gun refuses to work unless it can authenticate the user somehow? That's unnecessary complexity that is going to do more harm than good. Or are we talking about things like setting distance fuses on airburst munitions, advanced scopes with auto-targeting, etc? That is a good idea.

      >Or what if you have gloves on?
      Or when they get hacked. There's been countless sci-fi movies/games/etc where someone is falsely accused because of smartgun data, when smartguns fail at a critical moment due to malicious interference, etc.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >sci-fi movies/games/etc
        Ok how about a real world example, need.
        >just like my heckin marvel movies!

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Ok how about a real world example
          There aren't any for smartguns yet because they don't exist yet. But there doesn't need to be. If someone as stupid as a scriptwriter from thirty years ago can see the risk why can't you? There's plenty of examples for other kinds of real-world tech. It's going to be fricking hilarious when some script kiddie starts firing off people's electronic triggers for shits and grins.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Or what if you have gloves on?

      What scenario are you imagining? First of all, the entire idea that you were ever going to use a gun for self-defense is pretty far-fetched. If you managed to achieve that, you would already be a statistical unicorn. So layering in this scenario where You just heard a window breakdown stairs and you grab your gun upstairs, and you're somehow too flustered to figure out how to hold the trigger properly or wearing your sleeping gloves, you've taken an already far-fetched scenario and made it impossibly far-fetched.

      The fact of the matter is, adding a gun to that situation is always dangerous. Just because you're the one who starts out holding it doesn't mean you're the one who's going to end up using it. By pointing out how flustered you're likely to be if it ever comes down to that, you are not making an argument against smart guns, you are making an argument against the entire notion of having a gun for self-defense. If you can't figure out where to put your trigger finger, you probably shouldn't add a gun to an already volatile situation. Smart gun or not, you are making a strong argument that you're going to be less safe overall either way. You are likely to get yourself killed instead of just robbed. Of the people who just call 911 in that scenario, I think a higher percentage of them are going to survive to tell their co-workers the next day then those who get out their gun. Owning a gun is a great way to get yourself killed. At least with a smart gun, The person killing you won't be an intruder who was unarmed, your angry lover or your toddler.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Some of us live on regions where it's cold for half the year and we take precautions such as face masks and gloves to keep us comfortable.
        If a gun cannot meet these requirements I have zero interest in it. If you want it by your nightstand forever go ahead but I enjoy using my guns.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          At night in bed?
          It seems to me the use case is purely “for the nightstand” because if the gun is in a holster in your control there’s no worry

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Maybe it's not a product for "some of us" then. SWAT probably shouldn't be using them either, but SWAT weapons aren't usually stored within reach distance of kids.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >First of all, the entire idea that you were ever going to use a gun for self-defense is pretty far-fetched.
        Why do people keep repeating this bullshit claim? You dont know where anon fricking lives, crime is not homogeneous across the country

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          He's not even American, his whole thesis is that you shouldn't have a gun and should just call 911

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >not American
            >call 911
            huh?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              The united states is not the only country that uses 911 for their emergency services

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I assumed he was a euro talking about Americans, but fyi leafs use 911 too

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The united states is not the only country that uses 911 for their emergency services

                >United States, Canada, Mexico
                That's all americans.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          He's not even American, his whole thesis is that you shouldn't have a gun and should just call 911

          Actually I apologize to that anon, on second glance I think I misread him.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >st of all, the entire idea that you were ever going to use a gun for self-defense is pretty far-fetched
        >t.limpwristed delusional homosexual that gets killed by wildlife

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        This. If they actually come out with a decently reviewed smart gun I’d buy it. I keep most of my collection unloaded in a safe. I do keep a 1911 with 2 loaded mags in a wall lockbox with a quick 5 button lock (press 2 buttons, press one button quarter turn and open) in case I’d actually need a loaded firearm while in the house.. I have kids,. The odds of my kids doing something moronic are likely higher in my area than needing to actually shoot some kind of intruder.. I mostly keep it ready so that I have the possible option of ready access to a loaded gun.. quite frankly I’m in a small town and it gets real rural real fast as you drive away so the most likely thing I’d ever need it for is if a coyote got in the backyard and went after my chickens or dogs…. The locking cabinet, and keeping the mags loaded but not in the gun and chambered are all choices I made to make it less likely a kid could get access to it.. I specifically went with my 1911 because I doubt my kids have the hand strength to rack the slide…. Having some kind of biometric check on the pistol to allow only myself or my wife to use it would be a plus in my mind because while you do have more options available when you have access to a loaded gun, you also have more risks…. Also fwiw I’ve always thought the “gloves” argument is bs… especially if your use case is in your house and not out and about concealed carry….

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >with a quick 5 button lock (press 2 buttons, press one button quarter turn and open) in case I’d actually need a loaded firearm while in the house
          Doesn't seem quick at all
          >i have kids
          Sounds like you're doing them a tremendous disservice by not drilling firearms safety into them
          >but they're too young
          Learned in the 4H when I was 8

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Doesn't seem quick at all
            Yeah, especially when fingerprint safes are so cheap. I bought one off Amazon on a lark thinking it would probably suck, but it actually works well enough to be primary storage

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It’s easier to do than describe and the button mechanism doesn’t take batteries.

            I do, but kids are kids, and having been one, I know they can be fricking stupid.

            b***h I have twin 5 year olds…

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >5 year olds......
              >too young to learn Eddie Eagle.......
              >too young for very closely supervised trigger time with a cricket .22.............

              Seriously though, you should be teaching them Eddie Eagle right now.
              >STOP! Don't touch! Leave the area! Tell an adult!
              There's even a fun little dance.

              ?si=V0cIhzqXvCJVToiG&t=175
              If you're wondering how effective it can be I was shown this specific video ~30-31 years ago and I even remembered the damn dance having not seen it again once until last year when a friend of mine was worrying about when to teach his kid.

              The Cricket is a little kid sized .22lr single shot bolt action that is specifically there for you to teach your wee little snot goblins while also killing the mystique and sating their curiosity. They come in all sorts of styles including huntin gun, AWM (!with bipod WOOO!), nugget (proper 91/30), and more. It is SIGNIFICANTLY better to start teaching them early for a wide variety of reasons and those guns are meant for very young children like 5 year olds. A big risk is YOU might have your guns locked up tight because you're sure your kids are moronic, but what about the guns at their friend's house? Do you really want to wait when starting is as simple as teaching your kids a goofy little dance while playing with them?

              Kids that know Eddie Eagle and the four rules of firearms safety are not the ones that accidentally shoot their siblings in the face because someone left their piece out.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Eddie Eagle doesn't word CHUD, it only makes kids more curious about guns and more likely to pick one up. Guns should be removed from homes with children, by force if necessary
                t. Mom demanding action

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >t. gay moron who should put against a wall and executed by force

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I know it's a shitpost but honestly, this.
                Try restricting a child's access to a toy-shaped object (of which a gun is one, due to toy companies), or anything really, and they'll inevitably try and play with it or gain access to it.
                If you have kids in the house from anywhere between 1 and 18 years of age (the moron phase), you should keep guns properly stored. Ammo and guns kept locked in separate containers, edw on person or within observation, and bolts removed on the rifles that allow for it.
                >t. proponent of the program-deprogram fear of guns to prevent complacency.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Ammo and guns kept locked in separate containers
                This seems like overkill to me. The only reason I do it is because I have too many guns and too much ammo to store in the same cabinet

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What are you on about?
        it is a fact that peoples finemotorskills and reasoning go down in a stressfull situation,

        the 70% of your worst day at practice is a rule of thumb to emphesise that fact. training helps raise that 70%
        but detrimental effects of adrenaline
        effects civies, police officers, swat, solders.
        Only true remedy is exposure and after a while, exposure will become detrimental to other aspects of your life.

        AS far as good nufff accuracy- Mr dicken
        mid 20s, no optics glock, 40 yards , 10 hits.

        as far as improper grip : (i dont like the channel but this was interesting:https://youtu.be/vViw80If73k?si=51p4SODEmuNhDFyv

        Non dominatn hand crossdraw, holding the gun upside down shooting with the pinky. SUCH situations are rare, very rare.
        But they do happen because
        K/ombat is K/haotic, weird shit happens.

        As far as getting your self kileld (4 rules of gun safety)
        If your kids cant safely handle firearms, there are ways to limit access to Mission impossible levels while still having it accesable to you.

        ALSO if a dumb 19 yo can learn to safely handle and shoot firearms in the military, you can too.
        Only lover who would use a firearm to kill you is dumb as a sack of bricks or violent by nature and gun or no gun (for both of you) you will likely be getting the short end of the stick..

        Violent crime is not represented equally across america, there are hotspots, if you happen to be there, you probably want a gun. ALSO
        violent crime happens even in peacefull areas.

        As far as arguments for gun ownership: THE 2nd AMENDMENT, self defense is a part of it but not the only reason for your RIGHT to own a weapon.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I can smell the Starbucks onions latte from here.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you work with your hands for a living you are probably wearing gloves so your hands aren't getting cut up or covered in nasty shit. also, sometimes it is cold outside, apparently. this isn't complicated.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You tell me

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The only "smart" guns I want are in the vein of aimbots, things that add functionality instead of subtract.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    An overcomplicated mess. Just one more point of failure in a device that requires rapid deployment. But I can see Commiefornia and israelite York mandating it as soon as their moronic pens can slap the ink on a page.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We need smart gun owners first, then we’ll talk.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Xir, your onions latte with non-fat, fair trade milk is ready

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >mmm yes how delicious, but is this gluten free?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Always 🙂

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Can you just kick the shit out of these people and get away with it?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Only if done right.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Whatever you say Hotshot

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What was that?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I said 'Hotshot"

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're moronic but I love that people keep trying as they seem like a very cool concept.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    moronic fricking gimmick.
    Half of the phones I had sometimes refused to unlock on the first, second, or third try with a fingerprint sensor - under regular conditions.
    Add wet/sweaty/greasy hands and the sensor was basically unusable.
    Face scanners get mogged by headwear or even sunglasses.
    I like tech but I sure as hell am not betting my life on chink circuitry and code written by some underpaid intern.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Half of the phones I had sometimes refused to unlock on the first, second, or third try with a fingerprint sensor - under regular conditions.
      my samsung's fingerprint scanner somehow worked through a rubber glove I was wearing the other day while doing an oil change. It uses an ultrasound scanner which is even more baffling. And that thing is accurate, nobody else can open it but me, so it must have been sensing it through the glove.
      If my shitty phone can do that, I imagine if you put another $500 into the sensor, you can make a pretty foolproof print reader for bare hands

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I know many gun owners who keep all their guns unloaded and in a safe; literally all of them. Not one is within reaching distance. They've never felt the need to take a gun with them everywhere they go. They own guns because they think their one of humanities greatest inventions. They just think they're neat. But, they also have young kids and want to ensure said children have 0 access to them.

    So, how is using a lock on a gun (that is tied to biometrics or a phone app) any different than gun safes? What if they don't feel the need to take a gun with them everywhere they traveled to? What if they don't feel having one within arms reach at night was needed?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Literally this. There's nothing wrong with them.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd argue that they start to fail the moment you realize your 9mm requires a charged battery to fire.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That would be no different than forgetting to load ammo into your gun before you pick it up imo

      honestly a good idea if they're 100% reliable and can't be remotely shut off by the government or an EMP or something.
      In reality they'll probably only be good for niche situations like prison guards who might have their gun swiped

      Good for police and I like that you can leave it anywhere without having to worry about hiding it or putting it in a safe

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >add an additional point of failure to a technology where all failure modes endanger someone's life
        it's a moronic idea, it makes no sense, it's stupid, and it adds literally nothing to anything
        it's equivalent to putting facial recognition/fingerprint recognition into a helicopter, and it'll lockout the controls and apply the rotor brake if you're not the registered user
        the use-case for this kind of thing is always
        >your kids won't shoot themselves!
        or
        >you'll never get shot with your own gun!
        or
        >it prevents someone from stealing it

        which are all stupid because
        >lock up your fricking guns when your kids are in the house or use a robust retention holster/lock if you're going to have one outside of the safe
        >unless it's polling your face every second, you could get shot with your own gun. additionally, use a retention holster, dumbass
        >it doesn't prevent it from being stolen/used in crime, it just prevents someone from using it then and there

        >I like that you can leave it anywhere without having to worry about hiding it or putting it in a safe
        it's an electronic lockout device for a mechanical item
        give me 30 minutes and a dremel and I'll convert it back to a normal gun

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >it's an electronic lockout device for a mechanical item
          >give me 30 minutes and a dremel and I'll convert it back to a normal gun
          It will take you much longer than 30 minutes and at that point you could have just drilled into the fricking safe. What kind of argument is this?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >it's an electronic lockout device for a mechanical item
          >give me 30 minutes and a dremel and I'll convert it back to a normal gun
          anon you're missing the point. Any locking device can be bypassed with the good old drill attack. The most expensive padlock on earth can be cut through in 5 seconds with a proper torch. That doesn't make them useless. The entire point of a locking device is to provide friction to access. In the case of a gun, various levels of friction can be desired. If you want to stop anyone from using it ever, you obviously have to lock the gun in an armory somewhere, or at least a giant safe. The locking device in this thread is more like a masterlock padlock, meant to stop short term access in the seconds to minutes range. It's not designed to stop a criminal from getting the gun and reengineering it into a working gun over the course of hours.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Its actually not, the firing pin is electronically controlled

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          and when I'm talking about failure modes, i'm talking about:
          >it's not charged
          someone dies
          >it doesn't unlock when it should
          someone dies
          >it unlocks when it shouldn't
          someone dies
          >software hangs or updates and locks you out
          someone dies

          the failure modes for literally each and every component of this system could result in someone dying.
          it's exactly the reason why the sig drop and holster fire thing was such a stink, because despite it being a very niche issue that did not affect all models and required a specific drop angle and height, every single failure mode for a firearm is potentially lethal
          it's not like a phone where 90% of failure modes are
          >"failure mode: software update fails due to hang condition caused by transfer from wifi to LTE, effect: customer is unsatisfied, phone restarts, OCC: 3, SEV: 1"

          >it's an electronic lockout device for a mechanical item
          >give me 30 minutes and a dremel and I'll convert it back to a normal gun
          It will take you much longer than 30 minutes and at that point you could have just drilled into the fricking safe. What kind of argument is this?

          >it's an electronic lockout device for a mechanical item
          >give me 30 minutes and a dremel and I'll convert it back to a normal gun
          anon you're missing the point. Any locking device can be bypassed with the good old drill attack. The most expensive padlock on earth can be cut through in 5 seconds with a proper torch. That doesn't make them useless. The entire point of a locking device is to provide friction to access. In the case of a gun, various levels of friction can be desired. If you want to stop anyone from using it ever, you obviously have to lock the gun in an armory somewhere, or at least a giant safe. The locking device in this thread is more like a masterlock padlock, meant to stop short term access in the seconds to minutes range. It's not designed to stop a criminal from getting the gun and reengineering it into a working gun over the course of hours.

          >What kind of argument is this?
          >steal gun and it is now in my physical possession
          >take it home
          >look up teardown video
          >"oh, there's the trigger bar blocker solenoid and detent"
          >punch pins
          >file it off with a dremel
          >reassemble into functioning "dumb gun"
          the point is that it adds additional failure modes which are intrinsic to the firearm and non-removable

          Its actually not, the firing pin is electronically controlled

          that's even worse

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >the point is that it adds additional failure modes which are intrinsic to the firearm and non-removable
            The point is not to remove heckin ghost guns from the black market and stop people from having firearms but stopping unwanted people from swiping your pistol

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            if you've never had a job in risk, you won't understand that the consequences of ignoring the FMEA and risk assessment matrix are that people die

            >the point is that it adds additional failure modes which are intrinsic to the firearm and non-removable
            The point is not to remove heckin ghost guns from the black market and stop people from having firearms but stopping unwanted people from swiping your pistol

            >but stopping unwanted people from swiping your pistol
            but it doesn't stop people from swiping your pistol
            it stops people from USING your pistol if it works as advertised
            it will also stop you from using your pistol in a self-defense situation if for any reason any component of the system doesn't work

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't know that I lend the failure mode talk any weight when the non-failure mode is also 'someone dies' in the case that the gun is being actively used in self defense.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >someone dies
            Isn't that the intended result?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Best post itt

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    honestly a good idea if they're 100% reliable and can't be remotely shut off by the government or an EMP or something.
    In reality they'll probably only be good for niche situations like prison guards who might have their gun swiped

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >this thread, again
      a solution looking for a problem. they're designed to make using a firearm much harder

      what can be hacked will be hacked. a smart gun, just like a smart car will be used for terrorism and further control over time. imagine the headlines, for several hours today 1000s of loaded firearms went off seemingly at random due to a data breach at smart gun inc granting full control of their firearms into the hackers hands. over 100 people where carrying their weapons and got hit in the hand leg or foot by the hackers. only 4 have died.

      other than a smartphone and computer I want all my stuff as dumb as possible. no alexa, no spy tv, my next car will be between 2000 and 2015. part of the reasons there is so many firearms sold is people know some stupid shit "gun control" to mandates

      >In reality they'll probably only be good for niche situations like prison guards who might have their gun swiped
      this. great for .01% and shitty for 99.9.

      That would be no different than forgetting to load ammo into your gun before you pick it up imo

      [...]
      Good for police and I like that you can leave it anywhere without having to worry about hiding it or putting it in a safe

      >That would be no different than forgetting to load ammo into your gun before you pick it up imo
      >doesn't keep their guns loaded and chambered
      gay

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just don't think the juice is worth the squeeze.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Already preordered mine. Supposed be available in August.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Preordering guns
      Actually even more moronic than preordering games

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        My order is in the second batch, so I’ll be able to see how good/shitty the gun is before I get the option to actually buy. If it’s ridiculously shitty I’ll just refund. If it’s decent, I’ll buy and the gun will probably be worth quite a bit since there’s no way this company will stay afloat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Gen 1 adopter, you really are braindead. Funding antigun lobbying companies, frick you traitor. They will push to kill competition all new rosters all guns must be smart now because we proved it can be done meanwhile its a glitchfricked piece of hot garbage that had trouble pairing to its watch and every iteration for the past decade has been a failure.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Have you considered maybe you should be mad at and fighting the politicians who created the roster in the first place?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >$1499.00
      Could've bought a USP and 500 Rounds of 45 for that price

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You do realize that’s half the cost… they owe another 1350 when the order finalizes..

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      JFC, I can get some REALLY nice pistols for that kind of lucre.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Give us an honest review when you get it anon.

      >Doesn't seem quick at all
      Yeah, especially when fingerprint safes are so cheap. I bought one off Amazon on a lark thinking it would probably suck, but it actually works well enough to be primary storage

      No batteries, it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >No batteries, it
        Huh? It has a key backup obviously

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I’m sure finding the key in a hurry when you discover the batteries are dead is super quick.

          Honestly though the wall safe came with the house. It’s a good setup that’s reasonably secure, reasonably quick to access and I didn’t have to buy anything else, just look up how to reset the button combo.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >I’m sure finding the key in a hurry when you discover the batteries are dead is super quick
            The keys to my gun locker literally never come out of my pocket. I always forget that most people are weirdos who empty their pockets when they get home

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >t.never does laundry or changes pants

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Ok, not "literally", kek. Also, with the safe, I just change the batteries annually like I do with my weapon lights and optics

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Do you sleep in your pants? Look I’m not saying the fingerprint box is bad, I’m just pointing out that if I had to say which scenario is more likely… either my kids figuring out how to bypass a lock or guess a specific 3 button pattern that’s pressed in two steps with 5 possible buttons to choose from…. Or that I forget to regularly check and get surprised with a dead battery… I’m gonna say the battery scenario is more likely.. also with the key, what if your kids get the key somehow.. then the fingerprint scanner does frick all….

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Do you sleep in your pants?
                The keys are on my nightstand at night.
                >Look I’m not saying the fingerprint box is bad
                I know, and I'm not giving you shit either

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >preordering guns
      This is the cyberpunk dystopia we deserve.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >your optic will resume function after you watch this mandatory targeted advertisement.

        So what are they going to advertise in an optic.. my guess for top 5 are 1. Insurance, 2. Prepping supplies, 3. Snake oil to fix limp dicks and grow hair in bald spots, 4. Body armor, 5. Gunsafes

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >So what are they going to advertise in an optic
          Brandon Herrara campaign ads

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >premium gold level optic owners can bypass these ads

            The cyberpunk future has potential to be cool.. but also potential to be utter bullshit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      make sure to show it off to Tyqueese when he comes to pick up your wife

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Lolz I was going to say
        “ my wife’s boyfriend said he might let me get a biofire gun for my next birthday!”

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't even like using red dots without having backup irons in case the battery died or the electronics fail. Having the entire gun dependant on battery-powered electronics is a non-starter. I'd rather have a shitty old nagant revolver than a high-capacity semi auto smart gun

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where's the auto-targeting system? Where's the holographic reticle that projects directly from the gun? Where's the ammo counter? Where's the voice activated sentry gun mode? Where's the explosive charge planted in the grip so it blows up when an unauthorized user tries to shoot it? I've said it before and I doubt this is the last time I'll say it, we live in the gayest and lamest cyberpunk dystopia

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Sorry anon, best I can do is a gun that only works if you have a high enough social credit score. Asking those questions has unfortunately disqualified you from owning one, and it has been given to the nearest gay minority troony.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Darn, I kinda wanted one for the novelty

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >can't even solve a basic trig problem
    """Smart""" guns are such a grift, call me when they can solve differential equations

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >a retention holster
    So…avoid points of failure by adding another point of failure?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >by adding another point of failure?
      the process of risk management includes process improvements that minimize the effects or occurrence of a failure mode if the failure mode cannot be eliminated
      the end user generally cannot minimize the risks of legitimate issues caused by a failure mode of a product that is the result of hardware or software
      an end user can train with a retention holster to minimize the occurrence of "failure to draw" because generally with a retention holster the cause is not mechanical but a user failure under stress, because the holster itself does not have many failure modes that are not related to user error because they are mechanically simple devices.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        for example if we assume the "smart gun" consists of the following parts:
        >back grip sensor
        >left grip sensor
        >right grip sensor
        >facial recognition scanner
        >firing pin solenoid and detent
        >battery
        >CAN Bus or CPU
        >software if CPU
        each one of those has multiple failure modes that include electrical, physical, or defect-based failure modes, the occurrence of any of them leading either to the pistol not functioning, or the pistol functioning when it shouldnt, endangering lives.

        a level 3 retention holster has basically four:
        >user error of motion 1
        >user error of motion 2
        >user error of motion 3
        >mechanical failure of motion 1 button
        the occurrence of the first three can be substantially minimized

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Smart devices make stupid people
    It's not the 90s anymore. "Smart" means the product is slow, prone to failure, spying on you, and means that the product thinks it knows what you want when it never does

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >that webm

      dystopian as frick

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >why is some banking corpo having your genetic info linking it directly to your finances and integrating it with mass retailers dystopian

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It's just an NFC chip you have on your card.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              https://i.imgur.com/RUtsbzX.png

              >why is some banking corpo having your genetic info linking it directly to your finances and integrating it with mass retailers dystopian

              Why?

              >that webm

              dystopian as frick

              it's the fricking mark of the beast. even if you don't buy into christian mythology allowing companies to insert technology into you to be able to buy and sell is moronic and a bad road to go down

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Yes, the card. And using the spyware card instead of cash is 110% dystopian already. At least you can leave a card or smarthphone in your house and just leave out of the door, becoming untraceable.
              But once you put it inside your skin, you're no different from a chipped dog or piece of property. Then, your owner (ownership which was gained by making you dependent on this control and getting you away from private ownership and private transactions such as cash in the first place) always knows where you are.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            And even if you use gloves, shades, and a hat, you can still be IDd by your gait. In a not so distant future genetic testing might be so cheap that you get a genetic test upon entry of most establishments for the sake of "security".

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              This is why you buy a leg brace or get insoles that alter your foot bed placement and ultimately modify your gait if you're trying to avoid this software.

              https://i.imgur.com/A1KO0N9.jpeg

              It's just an NFC chip you have on your card.

              I can't tell if you're advocating for people to be tracked like cattle with embedded microchips, or if you're OK with companies having your finger/palm print on file to use for payment purposes (soon it'll be ocular like in Minority Report).

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Nah. I wouldn't ever do this. I think these people are stupid. But I also don't think it's dystopic, it's just fricking human laziness.

                that a private company and therefore anyone in the government can access. if they can't access it then it can't be updated and any software that can't be updated is going to fail very soon or be exploited.

                I'm talking about a system in general, not this one implementation in particular.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Nah. I wouldn't ever do this. I think these people are stupid. But I also don't think it's dystopic, it's just fricking human laziness.
                The thing about it is that once majority opinion shifts in favor of it, it becomes the norm and you lose any choice in the matter. It's like digital payment, cash is slowly being killed off in favor of phone apps and cards. Eventually it'll be 100% digital currency, probably in our lifetime considering how long ago they abandoned the gold standard anyways.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Take all of these measures to not be identified by cameras
                Grats then you get flagged as an anomaly and watched even closer

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Your handprint is neither formed from genetics nor does it contain genetic information

            >Ok how about a real world example
            There aren't any for smartguns yet because they don't exist yet. But there doesn't need to be. If someone as stupid as a scriptwriter from thirty years ago can see the risk why can't you? There's plenty of examples for other kinds of real-world tech. It's going to be fricking hilarious when some script kiddie starts firing off people's electronic triggers for shits and grins.

            Look pal I dont even deny those risks, it's just incredibly stupid to use fiction as a basis for your argument. This is rhetoric 101. Be better.

            I swear you motherfricking mouthbreathers...

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Handprints and fingerprints are unique to the individual; you are trying so very hard to argue semantics over private companies owning your frickin biological identifiers I'm also inclined to ask if you're hebrew in origin. Cut it the frick out.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I just want you dummies to be accurate when you're trying to male a point. Nothing discredits you more than getting a fundamental detail of your claim wrong

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                the funny part is that you're actually wrong, hand and fingerprints are formed in part from your genetics and also from environmental factors. way to embarrass yourself homosexual.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The original claim was that your handprint is the same as genetic information. I was half wrong in saying they aren't formed by genetics, yeah. Thanks for glossing over the part about handprints not encoding genetic information though

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >only I can use semantics to fine tune a minor victory in a non-existent internet argument
                >don't you dare use the same tactic against me!

                oy vey

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >why is some banking corpo having your genetic info linking it directly to your finances and integrating it with mass retailers dystopian
            Too many people don't understand that all banks and insurance firms already collect those kind of informations, especially in the US where they don't need your permission unlike the EU ((UE) 2016/679)

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              No they don't, unless you've voluntarily handed them over. No company will have your blood type, fingerprints, handprints, gait pattern, DNA, or anything of that sort unless you've provided it or it was taken through some legal act (i.e. arrested for a felony).

              They want you to just give it over to them through small things like your smartphone. Just register your FACE and EYEBALLS and FINGERPRINTS to Apple Inc. or whatever so you can quickly unlock your goybox and consoom more propaganda without a pesky passcode.

              HURRY UP ANON YOU'RE MISSING FUNNY MINIONS MEMES ON FACEBERG.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                My bank by default had the collection of these "particular categories" allowed by default. It didn't let me turn it off until I sent a certified email to my local subdivision asking if it was true that I couldn't opt out of them and they immediately called me back, scheduled a meet and had me go in person to confirm that I didn't want them being able to use those kind of data and collecting it. by default the only kind of data collection I could opt out of was the marketing stuff.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Sorry I think we're missing each other on this. I'm talking about the actual, literal collection of it. Not that you'd consent to it, but them actually obtaining and having something like your fingerprints. Unless you go up to some machine and scan your fingerprints, or purposely input it on a smartphone or something, they wouldn't have them. Only other option would be to get them via some backdoor like a government entity (i.e. police who fingerprinted you), but that's protected info they can't sell to any private companies.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >but them actually obtaining and having something like your fingerprints
                yeah, my bad. But let me tell you a fun fact. Banks and insurances as far as we know to get our fingerprints would need to phisically collect them, but now for example my bank app changed in that if I want to be able to "sign" and be able to see official documentations sent to my "smart desk" I now need to also enable biometric auth which is either from the phone fingerprint sensor or with apple face id. Before that I only needed to use biometric stuff only if I wanted to speed up the sign in process instead of using my password + code + 2factor auth, now they made it mandatory to use the biometric even for those communications that I otherwise would need to go phisically to the bank to read.
                I never gave them my fingerprints but now I will have to, and if I didn't remove the consent on their ability to collect "particular categories" they would be able to keep them forever as its written in their contract. And guess what when my parents were called in to "update their anagraphical data" from the bank they told them those data were mandatory to keep a account open (lie).
                They are slimier than an eel

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                That is slimy as frick for sure. I resist and refuse this kind of wrangling at all costs. My work issued phone was demanding I give it my face for Apple's database and I refused no less than 7 times before they said OK and dropped the issue. The second my bank starts limiting my ability to conduct business without my frickin DNA or something I will switch banks. If they ALL go this route I guess it'll be the day I withdraw 100% of my funds and spend it on cabin supplies and a plot of land in the forest.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >. If they ALL go this route I guess it'll be the day I withdraw 100% of my funds and spend it on cabin supplies and a plot of land in the forest.
                I wish I could do that

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                phone biometrics are processed locally on the device and then passed to apps to use. they dont get your actual fingerprints, just a passed checksum.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                no, for bank apps they are processed on their servers

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Also, in the US all those collected data are owned by the company and not by you. it's literally their own property and you can only ask they don't collect it further.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Anon, you know if you travel on a visa, you need to get fingerprinted these days, right?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I’m so excited for morons to start chipping themselves so I can walk through a crowded train with an rfid reader and digitally yoink 30 credit cards

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Actual smart guns, such as that israeli triggerbot gizmo, are promising.
    "Smart" guns like the one in your pic are marketing gimmicks and as such should be ignored.

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Frick you frick you frick you b***h shill, this malfunctioning piece of 22lr shit jammomatic has never even survived an opening day of shot show I hope the people who suffer the first tragedy for trusting this piece of garbage sue your company into the ground just like bushmaster and the rest of the anti gunners targeted companies.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    they shouldn't exist. their whole concept goes against the second amendment. If you don't want to be used by an unauthorized person store it somewhere out of reach or in a safe.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How does electing to use an armament that is designed to function only for the owner constitute infringement of the right to bear said armament?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        How is using a lock on a gun (that is tied to biometrics or a phone app) any different than gun safes? They both serve the same purpose, of keeping people who you don't want using your gun from using it. What's the issue?

        It brings into the table the concept of there being people who shouldn't have access to guns. If a gun like this were successfull you'd immediately have antigunners demand that all guns should have this feature and that guns should be remotely deactivated when necessary by the government

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          why would it need to be successful for antigunners to demand that?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            because if it is a failure that doesn't work the they can't demand it, it's like the greens demanding that all cars be replaced with oxygen fueled flying dildo cars. how can they demand something that doesn't exist?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >because if it is a failure that doesn't work the they can't demand it,
              that doesn't make sense, anon. People demand things that don't work great all the time, how do you think things get improved or refined?
              >how can they demand something that doesn't exist?
              It does exist though, if only conceptually

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I see. But that would only apply to a broader implementation that treats the gun like an IoT device. If it's an airgapped, integrated biometric lock tied only to the gun and the owner, then there's no way a third party could just disable it at their whim

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It would never be "for the owner." The government already mandates backdoors for computers and cars, and they'll mandate backdoors for these too.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, you'd have to be unfathomably naive to think the government wouldn't immediately compromise everybody's gun as soon as they got the chance

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How is using a lock on a gun (that is tied to biometrics or a phone app) any different than gun safes? They both serve the same purpose, of keeping people who you don't want using your gun from using it. What's the issue?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >their whole concept goes against the second amendment
      It's my property.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that a private company and therefore anyone in the government can access. if they can't access it then it can't be updated and any software that can't be updated is going to fail very soon or be exploited.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >software that can't be updated is going to fail

          LOL I am looking at my 1995 IBM Aptiva that runs MSDOS and Windows 95 flawlessly. It has *never* been updated in its life and runs perfectly. The only reason "updates" are required is for things linked to other software via the internet. "Updates" are a common thing mainly because software is released without being properly tested and you're the guinea pig, so they "fix" it and "patch" it after you've fricked around with it. Basically you're paying for a half finished product. The other reason they update is to continually fish for metadata which has a million uses for paying customers (you're not the paying customer in this equation anymore).

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Jesus you're such a tech illiterate moron.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Nah, he's right. Offline workhorse software never ever gets updated unless the hardware changes or there's some error that existed from day 1 that needs to be fixed. I have plenty of ancient tech both at home and at work that hasn't seen any updates in years. Why the hell would you need to update something that's working as intended?

              >performance upgrades
              It's a biometric lock. If an update is needed then it was a bad product from day 1. See my earlier statement about errors. Same shit.

              because if it is a failure that doesn't work the they can't demand it, it's like the greens demanding that all cars be replaced with oxygen fueled flying dildo cars. how can they demand something that doesn't exist?

              You are a dumbass. New Jersey already has a law on the bokks that says smart guns will be the only legal handguns in the state once they're widely available on the commercial market. "Trigger" laws that don't go into effect until something changes to make them legal/viable are not a new concept in law.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Why the hell would you need to update something that's working as intended?

                You wouldn't. That's why I didn't bother responding to his homosexual ass comment, he was just being antagonistic. My IBM still chugs along even though it was packed in a box for 3 years without even being plugged in. Somehow the original 29 year old internal battery still kept a charge because it booted up just fine.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?
    An extremely powerful and promising technology that, like all such technologies, can be used for or against the owner, and that has a lot of ignorant morons spouting about it.

    The big issue that a mixture of general public tech ignorance, politician tech ignorance, and extensive lobbying has allowed to go mostly unaddressed is who owns the root keys. The most fundamental question is that, if the owners always have the right and technical ability to alter the software however they want then the room for mischief is lowered. The big problem is that companies are constantly trying to slip in control, and there is no law that says owners must have the ability to add root certificates to their trusted key store. Most of /k/, let alone the general pop, will have no idea what that even means or the implications. Instead there is a reasonable general worry about companies abusing power, which has happened a lot already.

    So it's a big theory-vs-practice thing to me: I'd definitely like for nobody unauthorized by me to be able to use my guns, even if they grab them out of my hand. I'd like to be able to know where they are. I'd like if it was very, very hard for thieves to make use of guns. I'd like to be able to have more granularity with my kids, like, "you can use this gun on the range but not frick with it after school before we're home without permission". That'd be a trivial setting for a smart gun. I'd like if we could get rid of all safe storage and so on in favor of the gun not working except for the owner or people the owner authorizes.

    But I'd also hate all the bullshit in other tech. Any sort of "cloud" link, companies locking you out, subscription shit, monitoring, whatever. None of that is inherent to the tech, but I can easily see it being done.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      tl;dr: smartgun would be cool if 100% open source software and open access hardware. total shit and should be illegal otherwise.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They make more sense for police and military use than civilian IMO. Would make it difficult for someone to steal a cop’s gun and shoot them with it, would make it easier to track misuse of firearms by these forces, would let them keep data on when/where personnel are using their guns, etc. as a standard issue thing for an organized force, they make sense to me. As a civilian the applications are a lot more limited

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >They make more sense for police and military use than civilian IMO. Would make it difficult for someone to steal a cop’s gun and shoot them with it, would make it easier to track misuse of firearms by these forces, would let them keep data on when/where personnel are using their guns, etc. as a standard issue thing for an organized force, they make sense to me. As a civilian the applications are a lot more limited
        I think that's where it will start for sure, the benefits are the most direct and obvious. But a lot of us have very nice guns and kit, and children. The vast, vast majority of children gun deaths aren't because of ZOMG MASS SHOOTINS' BAN DA ASSAULTER RIFLES but much more sad, little hands getting ahold of something they're too young for and playing around with it. Religiously locking everything up helps but of course has its downsides as well.

        If a smart gun had no downsides and was fully under my control I'd pick one up in an instant for that reason alone. Honestly I'd be excited about being able to have perfectly adjustable trigger just with an app, potential for much more efficient power system and linked accessories and so on as well longer term. There's plenty of potential awesome stuff about smart guns, it's just there's plenty of potential bullshit as well. All the more reason though to be paying attention and try to influence them going in a positive way.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Electric triggers that can make any gun essentially have a below 1 pound trigger pull is far more interesting than "smart" tech that is essentially a very shitty bio-metric safe on a gun.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Neat idea, dogshit implementation.

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >people on /k/ are unitonically advocating for the gun grabber Trojan horse that is the smart gun
    Frick the stupid war in Ukraine for flooding this board with noguns Europeans.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm

      they shouldn't exist. their whole concept goes against the second amendment. If you don't want to be used by an unauthorized person store it somewhere out of reach or in a safe.

      and I'm a yuro

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Redguard, it's been already done before with the Armatix smartgun and nothing happened. And instead of b***hing about new technology being intertwined with firearms now how about harassing the politicians who want to ban them in the first place instead of seething about said technology which in the long run isn't that important anyways?

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It will get some cops killed by human errors, injuries, and technical failures because some liberal areas will mandate them for police in urban areas where firearms are most needed. Then, there will be a push for all civilian guns to have them like modern and future car safety equipment, including a remote kill switch and tracking.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      do you think that that will not also improve the fidelity of the technology?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It will, but in Human Factors at a governmental and policy level, it usually takes deaths to force adoption or upgrades in technology.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >it usually takes deaths to force adoption or upgrades in technology.
          People would die anyway no matter what, so thats a big ol' shrug from me chief.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I forgot to say that it won’t be facial recognition because of light, masks, and facial injuries. It won’t be finger prints due to gloves, hand injuries, and material covering the sensors. At the last Human Factors conference i went to the ideas of a wearable or implant seemed the most logical.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >it won’t be facial recognition because of light, masks, and facial injuries
          >It won’t be finger prints due to gloves, hand injuries, and material covering the sensors
          Seems like an incredibly narrow set of circumstances in which all the various ways to validate a user are degraded

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Perhaps, but you want to engineer out any potential failure points or "Swiss Chesse" in expected human errors, while maintaining the calculated signal to noise ratio. Finger prints and facial recognition are poor for this application and we can come up with the expected root cause analyses of the failure points, given the current technology. Think of red dots, even if detritus gets in/on them you can still point shoot. However, with current biometric sensors it can become fully non operational.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >it won’t be facial recognition because of light, masks, and facial injuries
              >It won’t be finger prints due to gloves, hand injuries, and material covering the sensors
              Seems like an incredibly narrow set of circumstances in which all the various ways to validate a user are degraded

              or simply, some piece of shit chinese made sensor will break under normal circumstances a gun goes through (expousure to oil and solvents, shock, falling on top of it in the middle of being assaulted) the ruger P-series was rejcted from both the army just because its dewienerer lever broke if you dropped it from 10 feet on hard concrete, (something most safety levers will do) piece of shit smart guns break like an Iphone falling on linoleum from 4 feet

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think the one you posted is the only good attempt at one so far. The ability to authorize multiple users with 100% reliable recognition is fricking amazing for a variety of reasons. If nothing else, at least nobody can shoot you with your own gun if you lose a tussle with it.
    There are a lot of people who are technologically illiterate who are afraid that introducing any electronic component to a gun somehow makes it vulnerable to tracking (even if it has no GPS or RFID) or remote disabling (even if it has no way to receive or process a signal.)

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like how they showcase the innate victim complex in progun people who say dumb shit like 'we need to boycott smartguns vuz da gubmunt will make them mandatory' despite the fact microstamping died off for being too expensive

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Internet of things and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're a very good way for grabbers to create gun laws without technically banning guns. New Jersey already tried to make a law banning the sale of non-smart guns when they became available. Meanwhile biofire's CEO had two guns in a row fail to fire during a live demo and nobody has provided an answer as to why a biometric holster isn't an objectively better solution beyond "what if you get robbed by John Wick and he knocks the gun out of your hands?"

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The whole premise is false anyways. Instead of teaching personal responsibility and advocating for better firearms training they just go "WELL THE GUN IS A KILLING MASHEEN AND MUST BE LOCKED TO ONE PERSON ONLY".

      This is incredibly fricked because it'll only be a matter of time before they just ASSUME guilt through use of a biometric gun.

      >oh your smartgun was used in a crime
      >well we know it's linked to you and you alone so you must've murdered this person
      >smartguns are infallible
      >they do not make mistakes
      >you are guilty of regicide and will spend the next 3,000 years in cryo-prison

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        One of my cousins father is actually one of Mark Wahlberg's personal pilots. Says he's an incredibly friendly dude who is willing to go out of his way to help the people who work for him. Yeah yeah, I know, "And my dad works at Nintendo!" But it's true.

        Course me and my cousins family are white, so that's not too surprising that he's kind to them compared with all the shit I've heard Mark do to minorities.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What does Markie Mark do to minorities?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't know of anything via my cousin as he says Mark has never done anything weird while he's been in his company. So just the rumors and he did obviously KO that Vietnamese guy.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What does Markie Mark do to minorities?

          I don't know of anything via my cousin as he says Mark has never done anything weird while he's been in his company. So just the rumors and he did obviously KO that Vietnamese guy.

          Markie went on a rampage that ended with time spent in juvenile hall. He bashed a random vietnamese guy in the head with a stick and punched him so hard he permanently blinded him in one eye. He called him a "VIETNAM FRICKING SHIT" too.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    "Smart" guns can't fix... Stupid people!

    Dave "Bird Dog" Johansen
    USMC Reserve 1968-1972 "Strikebreakers"
    MOPAR or NO CAR
    Forum Member since 1997

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?
    Thrash, electronics if at all belongs in a detachable sight unit

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >no big deal bro
    >just give them your fingerprint
    >don't you want convenience
    >they already have it anyways
    >just give in bro
    >just give in
    >stop resisting

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A legitimately neat idea murdered like a stovepipe hat enthusiast by traitorous politics. The only reason these will exist now is to help push gun control regardless of if that's the actual intent behind it's creation. If they are ever a profitable product it'll be decades at least.

    Actual gun folks will be extremely wary of any "smart" parts, even if they do cool shit like let you shoot really really fast, count ammo, set trigger behavior at the press of a button, etc. We'll always be worried the weapon is phoning home somehow, has a backdoor shutdown like in that one Metal Gear game, can be jammed, won't work the second the battery gets a little too low, will be malfunction prone in a way that we can't just brute force our way past. There's been several attempts to make neat electronic bits but between price and wariness they pretty much never go anywhere.

    The people that would actually buy them are buying baby's first gun and probably deathly scared of them. These people may really truly think guns just randomly go off and a kid dies every time. They see ads for it being childproof, unable to be used by thieves, only recognizing registered users, and all that jazz and it does really help them get through their fear a bit. Thing is they'll likely never get beyond that point and often will still support the people who are going to come knocking at their door after the regular guns are banned. Also, they are very lively to never shoot or maintain the gun. Soon as the batteries die just because it's been that long it's a very expensive paperweight and it's owner is now a candidate to have the final though "FRICK FRICK FRICK WHY ISN'T IT SHOOTING!". It's not a real defense weapon for them, it's a security blanket.

    The people that push them for muh "safety" and muh chillins would absolutely eventually try to ban them too if it's allowed to get that far. They don't want safer guns, they want no guns because they want to do shit you'd actually shoot them for.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Only the most virtue signal prone law enforcement agencies would be willing to buy them. The rest would decline for the same reasons we'd be wary. A cops weapon has to work and it has to work the second you pull the trigger. Latency issues could very easily turn IRL into every time you tried to play CoD on terrible internet while visiting grandma. It could also result in fairly clearly defined "service areas" for LEOs and directly incentivize the destruction of cell towers by gangs and whatnot. There are more reasons it's bad to cops than to us.

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cool, government first. And that remote shutoff signal the company that makes those applied for a patent for? Every city has one, and it's constantly on, but only for the government's weapons, and needs a unanimous vote from every citizen in the area to be shut off.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      noooo you can't just use technology to give power back to the people! it's meant to enslave you! stop exercising your rights you terrorist!

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They could have interesting applications, but my experiences with electronics in general and security systems in specific tell me that it's going to be a long time before I'd trust my life to one.
    That being said, a gun that only fires when pointed in the correct direction would be a godsend for training newbies at public ranges. No idea how you'd make that work reliably but I'm tired of people trying to flag half the range because they aren't engaging their brain.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Electronically locked training aid
      That is one niche use case where these guns could work very well. Maybe it has a couple internal sensors so that it can detect when it is in the range stall and pointed downrange in a narrow band. Could be paired with AR glasses so the shooter could see the "pipe" the firearm has to be in to be fired. Could also give instant feedback on bullet strike on target so the shooter can correct any deficiencies. This would help out new shooters, especially in institutional settings like boot camps or police academies where the shooter might never have fired a weapon before, and is frazzled from getting yelled at by psychopaths for eight weeks with no sleep.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >frazzled from getting yelled at by psychopaths for eight weeks with no sleep.
        That is why the weapons portion of basic training is much more relaxed, lol. They don't want the stress that they apply to you during the rest of the course to lead you to make mistakes when you're learning how to use a gun. Very good idea though, Itd work great for teaching new people at rental ranges too

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          They yelled at us in my rifle qual too, but I understand your point. They ought to ease up a bit. If nothing else, a smart M16 might prevent recruits from trying to off themselves.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They could have interesting applications, but my experiences with electronics in general and security systems in specific tell me that it's going to be a long time before I'd trust my life to one.
        That being said, a gun that only fires when pointed in the correct direction would be a godsend for training newbies at public ranges. No idea how you'd make that work reliably but I'm tired of people trying to flag half the range because they aren't engaging their brain.

        >frazzled from getting yelled at by psychopaths for eight weeks with no sleep.
        That is why the weapons portion of basic training is much more relaxed, lol. They don't want the stress that they apply to you during the rest of the course to lead you to make mistakes when you're learning how to use a gun. Very good idea though, Itd work great for teaching new people at rental ranges too

        They yelled at us in my rifle qual too, but I understand your point. They ought to ease up a bit. If nothing else, a smart M16 might prevent recruits from trying to off themselves.

        that idea is pants on head fricking moronic and everyone in this thread is now moronic for having listened to it, no offense but you should have a nice day
        along with you gay morons who think this idea has a single iota of merit
        If you cant be held responsible enough to simply hold a gun downrange without a fricking $5000 "smart" device from ~~*Booz allen hamilton*~~ or whatever jack off contractor milking the country for whats left of the US treasury, you shouldnt be allowed to touch a live fire arm, or even so much as a realistic looking airsoft gun in the first fricking place, let alone be trusted to defend the country when your limpwristed candy ass needs a child lock on a gun during training

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >If you cant be held responsible enough to simply hold a gun downrange without a fricking $5000 "smart" device from ~~*Booz allen hamilton*~~ or whatever jack off contractor milking the country for whats left of the US treasury, you shouldnt be allowed to touch a live fire arm
          But you are. Leaving the military aside, it would save private ranges a lot of money having to fix holes in the ceiling and close the place down when some suicidal dipshit rents a gun to blow his brains out

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Calm down you never served homosexual, or you're going to tip your mobility scooter over.

  39. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The problem with smart devices is that they do more for 3rd parties than they do for the person who "owns" them. I would be into reliable smart guns if I knew that nobody was collecting my information and that it took a warrant for the police to look at it. I also don't want my gun hacked by anyone. Imagine a criminal with a scanner that can tell if a potential victim is broadcasting smart gun signals. Imagine a business being able to detect and deny entry to concealed carry weapons. Imagine the government deciding to turn off all smart guns in a given area because of a social disturbance or natural disaster. Your ass is in the middle of some bad shit and now your gun doesn't work and you have to face the mob burning your neighborhood with an improvised club because the cops turned ALL the guns off but at the same time are too busy elsewhere to come help you. There's a lot of things that could go wrong.

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I want it to take a selfie every time I shoot the gun.
    I think I'll have a beautiful smile.

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I can't get my SmartWatch to turn the screen on in a reasonable time. I'm not going to rely on an electronic authentication system to fire a bullet fast enough after I pull the trigger to save my life.

  42. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're a godawful idea that needs to be humiliated and legislated out of existence.

  43. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stupid vaporware crap for soi consoomers

  44. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    CHARGE YOUR FRICKING GUN

  45. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >software defined safety systems
    that toOTaLLy works

    no issues over at boeing or in baltimore

  46. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?

    Chances of my owning one are slim to none, simply because of the nature of my collection.
    All that aside-
    The tech is shit, and the people pushing them are vile slime who need to be fed into a running woodchipper.

  47. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For a 'smart' gun that sure is a 'dumb' idea... hehe...

  48. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Good concept if reliable. Ruined by New Jersey and other failed states.

  49. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    insanely stupid
    there are lots of people who is hasguns, but they are noshooters, habla memeola senor?
    there are plenty of times where you don't have a perfect grip(boomers wont comprehend this last part, they're doing that head bobble thing as they read this right fricking now lol)

    smart guns are super stupid, but im all for cops, security and all those other morons carrying them

  50. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty lame how we've had AR goggles for years now and still can't easily connect them to gun optics.

  51. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A trojan horse for turnkey disarmament. Do not let a computer sit between you, the trigger, and the action.

  52. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    amazing idea they are just too bulky to work with adaptation of existing firearms. one would have to be purpose made for this role

  53. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Last thing I want on a beautiful analog rugged lump of metal and wood/plastic are el*ctronics. Frick your microcontrollers, I'm tired of that shit being everywhere.

  54. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How about every single car has a breathalyzer in it and drivers have to prove their sober before they can start it? Once we have that, I'll warm up to "smart" guns

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The problem with this suggestion is that the pathological authoritarians already want to do this.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >How about every single car has a breathalyzer in it and drivers have to prove their sober before they can start it? Once we have that, I'll warm up to "smart" guns
      I don't see why anyone would have a problem with this, except for criminals that shouldn't be driving while drunk and/or high anyway.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The problem with this suggestion is that the pathological authoritarians already want to do this.

      If you start having the same ideas as Eurocuckistani legislators, you probably need to sit down and rethink your life.
      t. Euro

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this is already slated for cars after 2035, Anon.

  55. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Its worthless to me unless they find a way to make a functioning titanfall smart pistol.

  56. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The only "Smart"gun I want to see is the M56. Anything else with that moniker can kindly go frick off.

  57. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why is everyone so paranoid ITT?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      IOT doesn't belong in everything and make things shittier

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        But you can imagine a closed system like this, over which you'd have complete control.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It'll never be a closed system with sole control given to the consumer

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Isn't this fairly easy to detect? The moment someone tears it down we'll be able to see if it has a wireless chip at all. And even then, how would it realistically connect to the internet if you don't connect it yourself?
            >inb4 requires an internet login to use
            Not even smartphones require you to do this, why would a gun

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Remember that time a guy got locked out of his smart home because a delivery driver said something racist and it violated the ToS?

      Access to things like shelter, a motor vehicle, or your gun should not be gated behind the power fantasies of silicon valley technocrat gays.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >t. absolute moron
        We can find dozens of guns in history that were absolute fricking garbage and got people killed. Or cars, or aircraft or whatever else. Does that mean we give them all up and go back to pointy sticks? No we just don't buy bad stuff.

        I've got a smart home. It's awesome, and what you describe is impossible since it's all under my control and not even connected to the internet at all.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's a safe bet nearly every "smart" device in your home has a way to phone home even if you think it's "not connected to the internet at all". Also a safe bet a lot of them have backdoors.

          Just because "It's awesome" doesn't mean it's safe from corporate frickery and data broker bullshit.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >It's a safe bet nearly every "smart" device in your home has a way to phone home even if you think it's "not connected to the internet at all". Also a safe bet a lot of them have backdoors.
            Um, no. I'm sorry you're moronic about technology anon, and if so then yes, you have decent reason to stay away from it. I understand most people aren't running PPSK and/or 802.1x networks with VLAN/internal VPN segmentation and an open source firewall/router/gateway, or selfhosting their own services for things like Home Assistant, but that's not because it's expensive or hard.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              If there's a moron here it's you being moronicly naive. A common trait for arrogant jackasses.
              Legitimately tech minded people don't trust it at all because they know what these things can do and how you can be lied to.

              If your smart home is all homebrew shit with no corp to tattle to then congrats, you've actually got a safe smart home and should probably start looking into manufacturing and selling. 99% of people are going to be using stuff that isn't actually safe from corporate data harvesting and spying from companies like Google, Microsoft, and Amazon then wonder why shit they mentioned in casual conversation near the wireta... Alexa is suddenly being advertised to them. Even without being on YOUR network all it takes is the thing being able to use things like cell networks and surprise, it's online.

              Nothing like your TV that supposedly hasn't been on a network period for years successfully updating while also continuing to tell you it's not connected to internet. Boy was that a fun reminder to never trust major tech corporations.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                In all seriousness anon for TVs look for commercial, they're usually not called "TV" because they don't want normal people to find them they're called shit like "commercial hospitality display" or the like. The kinds of screens that go into digital signage or enterprise conference rooms or whatever, where if the corp IT doesn't have full control heads roll. That's what I have at home, nice screen, rated to run 24/7 for like 5 years, and zero bullshit.

                And while yes a lot of people just get big corp stuff, the point is that is not inherent to the tech and is easily worked around. Just broadbrushing it does no favors and ultimately means most people will go along with that shit which is bad.

                Though honestly I'm kinda glad so many gun people are opposed just because it'll help create market pressure to do it open source and correctly.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Remember that time a guy got locked out of his smart home because a delivery driver said something racist and it violated the ToS?
        No, I don't, give link

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/amazon-customer-claims-company-locked-him-out-smart-home-devices-over-bogus-racism-allegations

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      A lot of people like that, senpai.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because every time you stupid fricking techBlack folk put your gay fricking bullshit in ANY consumer good it becomes WORSE and MORE FRICKING EXPENSIVE. Cars, washing machines dishwashers, air conditioners, refrigerators, even fricking TOASTERS. All of them have gay fricking IOT compatibility and they are all WORSE and MORE EXPENSIVE. Keep your gay bullshit OUT OF MY FRICKING GUNS! KILL YOUSELF!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Samsung got their asses sued off multiple times for exactly what you're too fricking stupid to understand. I cannot fathom how moronic you would have to be to still ask this question in 2024
      >why do you not trust the corpos bro
      >they love us bro
      >just sign over your life and everything to them bro
      >you'll love it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you're not really proving me wrong here

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Let's not even humor the thought we may get a note 7 situation again. Ah the irony of being killed by your super safe electronic home defense gun via a house fire

  58. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Smartphone
    Smartcar
    Smartgun
    Smartwoman (This one is an oxymoron)

  59. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If we lived in a fully white, low crime society they'd be a good idea.
    However, Black folk

  60. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Every single smart gun comes with a fed remote kill switch. Anyone who buys one is a moronic nog.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Every single smart gun comes with a fed remote kill switch. Anyone who buys one is a moronic nog.
      It would be neat if you could order a remote kill switch for these things off of the internet, that way if you are planning on murdering someone that owns one of these guns, you can disable their smart gun and then shoot them with your dumb gun at your leisure.

  61. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    "promising" (certain term and conditions may apply) the gun wont be used because of your "safety" feature is just declaring open season litigation on themselves, doesnt matter how many "non arbitration" agreements you have, your piece of shit product's failure point is ending in a preventable death, you are fricked
    which illuminates how little these morons thought ahead and how theyre just trying to "save the moronic children" who shoot themselves who would have been culled from the herd in some equally darwin award-tier accident in the home cause of death

  62. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I live in israelite jersery. I know this shit will become mandated once someone actually makes one
    >inb4 the law was repealed
    yeah, and they will unrepeal it the second someone makes a smart gun

  63. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For a range toy pretty cool, for self defense or war/SHTF absolutely not.

  64. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >What are your true and honest thoughts on 'smart' guns?
    we don't have a civilization that can engineer items that remain reliable for centuries, I wouldn't trust one of those to work even for years

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >we don't have a civilization that can engineer items that remain reliable for centuries
      First who cares? We don't live for centuries. And second Voyager 1 was launched in 1977 and still working, with expected final end of life in 2036 almost 60 years after launch. It's current 15.1 billion miles from Earth. This doomer thing is a good meme but we can indeed engineer stuff to last for ages under the absolute harshest conditions. It's just usually not worth it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >First who cares?
        the weapon owner should care theres completely superfluous component that can get them killed the moment they actually need the weapon

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's not what you said. You said we should care if it lasts centuries. Which applies to zero modern guns since they haven't even existed for "centuries", plural. And everything in the modern military depends on computers working. All advanced fighters for example are intrinsically aerodynamically unstable. If the computers fail they fall out of the sky. So we engineer them not to. Formally verified programming is a thing. Redundancy is a thing. Solid state electronics can easily be far less of a failure point then mechanical parts of guns themselves. Whining about bad ones existing is like whining about bad guns existing. There are plenty of guns that aren't reliable, so we just don't buy those.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >That's not what you said.
            I literally said I don't even trust it to last years

  65. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've come around to the idea that there should be bills trying to force cops to follow gun restrictions so the cops and their unions themselves can tell people why they are a bad idea and not to let them pass.

  66. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Finally found the damn image.

  67. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't trust them and don't think it would give me any added safety.
    If I was a wagie working at a gas station I guess it could be neat to have. But in my own life. It wouldn't save me but it could certainly get me killed if it bugged out and didn't work as intended.

  68. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I do not know why someone would build a smart gun.
    the most difficult parts to make are a strong rifled barrel, a locking mechanism, the ejection/extraction and the magazine. the

    electronic locks can be cut out of the gun or fail in a critical moment.

    Fingerprint probably wont work

    depending on the ID mechanism, it could prevent somebody from shooting you with your gun. but that would require "jewlery " as an RFID key or a chip implant.
    However If somebody is that close to take your gun from you , your RFID might (depending on setup) keep the gun unlocked

    Second option would be a lever activated safety+ thumb scanner activator like the p7,
    Squeeze the frip, scans thumb and as long as the grip safety is squeezed, the gun can fire withouth further authorisation.
    At that point just make the p7 safety

    your wife cant shoot you in your sleep with your gun?, but she can still piss arsenic into your morning covfefe.

    IF you want to prevent theft.
    The hardest parts of a gun to manifacture are the barrel, locking mechanism, ejection and extraction mechanism, and the magazine.
    the electronic gubbins can probably be taken out or replaced if integrated into (for example " the trigger/ firing pin mechanism

    Or the locking features can probably be mechanically blocked.

    a faraday bag will prevent tracking.

    It will prevent a would be 13 year old hoodlum from selling a stolen gun, but the criminal economy will adjust as it always does

    might reduce shortterm stolen gun economy, probably not even that

    No bueno

  69. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine all the times your phone has fricked up and you want that controlling a gun?

  70. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    kojima literally made a whole game answering this question for you. and he gave you tiddies in the next one.
    it's like you hate tiddies.
    why do you hatw the tiddies?

  71. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    although i agree it is definitely bad & weaponized against you in this case, to be clear.

  72. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    dumb shit for dumb people
    "yeah, I want a gun that I have to remember to charge"
    Statements by zoomer-brained moron goy consumers. Absolute dogshit and dangerous for gun rights.

  73. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I support smart guns for the police and military. Once they exclusively use them for a few decades then I'll consider buying one of my own.

  74. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Whats the point of this?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      To normalize IOT crap on guns so it can be mandated by law and then the government can turn off your guns remotely.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I mean for the end user. It's obviously a terrible idea but why the frick would anybody want to buy this?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The marketing material literally suggests it's a solution for people who want to leave a gun out for home defense but have young kids or share a house with roommates. Yes, the marketing material for this piece of shit literally suggests you leave a loaded gun within access of a minor and/or your sketchy roommates. It's literally being marketed as a device to facilitate negligence. If this garbage isn't vaporware and it actually ships I expect a massive lawsuit the second a toddler bangs it on the floor in just the right way to defeat the lock and shoot themselves in the face.

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