Was kherson assault feint?

Was kherson assault feint?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    its quickly memory holed because it was a huge failure that killed thousands of ukrops in the meatgrinder

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If it was a failure, why can't russia divert troops from there to Kharkiv?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        because the ukrainians still have a bunch of battalions there attacking. and because there's a big river in the way now.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So it would seem.
    The Russians expected Kherson to be the point at which they'd be hardest hit, when it wasn't they basically collapsed and withdrew.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There are still around 25,000 Russians on that side of the Dnipro river, completely unable to be resupplied because Ukraine blew all the bridges and will shell any pontoon Russia tries to set up.

    They will probably retake Kherson before the year ends, but they are giving priority to their gans in the North right now.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For the 5000th time no. It was and is pressure, but like any intelligent military UA was ready for whatever. If Russia HADN'T reinforced, then they would have moved harder there. If it did, then it'd weaken elsewhere. All this long time of bombarding logistics and command centers has been to stretch Russia thinner and thinner. UA intended for something to break but couldn't know where that would be, but naturally will have planned for lots of contingencies. That's what professional armies do. The goal is to leave your enemy with zero good options, and exploit any weakness they show no matter where.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, but unlike Kharkiv which had been depleted Kherson has a massive amount of russian troops, so that front has become a slog between the two armies

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not a feint, a trap.

    The main objective is denying the Russian army mobility by traping it's forces on their side of the Dnipro. that worked. Kharkiv ws the result.

    Now they are considering what to do with a heavily fortified but utterly demoralized Kherson.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't think so. It's probably a totally different kind of offensive from the Kharkiv bewegungskrieg, meant to be much slower due to the superior forces Russia has in Kherson. A slow advance is meant to escalate Russia's use of ammo beyond the resupply rate due to the fucked up supply lines. They probably want to slowly get to within artillery range of the pontoons at which point the fate of the Russian grouping will already be decided.

    The hype around this offensive was probably used as a distraction from the Kharkiv direction but this doesn't mean the offensive itself was a feint. If it's the case that that this offensive was used as a distraction then it worked wonderfully because Russia sent tons of BTGs to Kherson to get trapped rather than keep them for a possible transfer to Kharkiv.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They did multiple probing attacks. Neither was really a feint.
    There was small, Russian-tier gains in the Kherson sector but the other sector had unexpected success

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Was kherson assault feint?

    Nope, that's the fun part.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In the end, it tied up tens of thousands of Ukrop troops that would've been rampaging through Donbas by now. In retreat, Russia destroyed over 2000 desperately pursuing them.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      anon...
      those ukrop troops tied up russian forces that could have reinforced the kharkiv front

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I still think the ultimate goal is to liberate the city. However, Russia's operational reserves had to be sent somewhere and on the west bank of the Dnipro was the best place to send them.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It was but the Vatnik military is so Central African militia-tier they Ukies managed a few substantial breakthroughs without putting much will or effort to it.
    It remains to be seen if they'll see it as a new oportunity to press or not.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty much. Most of the reinforcements that were sent there were the ones that were holding the lines in the east. While the battle in the south has fixed them there leaving the east unguarded.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    no. either the russians decline to reinforce kherson in the face of that assault, in which case that assault punches through and rolls kherson, or russia does reinforce kherson to stop that assault, in which case the second assault would punch through and roll izyum. either way the bridges get blown to prevent the russians from shifting their forces around, allowing them to be defeated in detail.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what stopped the kherson offensive?
      why did the russians think they should reinforce the eastern front first and not the kherson front?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Nothing, it's just a different kind of offensive. At the moment the Russians have a shitload of supplies, because they've anticipated this for ages.
        Once the supplies run out though, and they will Kherson will collapse just as fast.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >what stopped the kherson offensive?
        Uh, reinforcements?
        >why did the russians think they should reinforce the eastern front first and not the kherson front?
        I think you need to spend a bit of time looking at a map anon. They didn't reinforce the eastern front. That's where UA just rolled them. They did reinforce heavily the Kherson front in the south. That's slow going. Kherson wasn't a "feint" though it's very important, but UA can't simply dictate battle happens whenever they want where they want they have to make maximum use so they're doing lots of pokes and careful pressure application then seeing what happens. If vatniks had left Kherson weak instead UA would have been all over it.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'm talking before the counter offensive.

          In hindsight, Kherson was the biggest victory they had, but it stopped short.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            not for lack of trying though

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >stopped in Voznesensk by angry village militia

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No it just sort of worked out that way. There were even reports that the US command talked them down from launching twin assaults initially (with the other going towards Melitopol) so they may have simply decided to launch this when they got frustrated by the lack of progress towards Kherson.

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