V-22 Osprey fleet will fly again with no changes

ROTOR IS FINE: The US military will allow its fleet of V-22 Ospreys to fly again, three months after it grounded the entire inventory of more than 400 aircraft following a fatal crash off the coast of Japan in November. The Marine Corps, Air Force and Navy will immediately start refreshing troops' training and changing maintenance procedures as prerequisites for resuming normal operations, leaders from each of the services told reporters. The Ospreys will receive no equipment modifications before they return to the air.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >following a fatal crash off the coast of Japan in November.
    That’s not very typical, I’d like to make that point.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Well there are a lot of these flying around all the time and we don't want people thinking Ospreys aren't safe

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Was this Osprey safe?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No we were thinking more about the other ones. The ones where the rotor doesn't fall off

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Wasn't this one built so the rotor wouldn't come off? How do you know?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Well obviously not because the rotor fell off and a bunch of aircrew dropped into the sea and caught fire. What I'm saying is that is not normal

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Well what sort of standards are these Ospreys built to?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Very rigorous aviation engineering standards of course

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                What sort of things?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Well the rotors aren't supposed to fall off for a start

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The V-280 will fix the tiltrotor problem since it isn't heavy as frick like the Osprey causing disc-loading issues with the rotors

    Helicopters are dead

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >V-22 Osprey fleet will fly again with no changes
    >The Marine Corps, Air Force and Navy will immediately start refreshing troops' training and changing maintenance procedures
    well done, OP. good to see you morons continue to contradict yourselves in your own words.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >V-22 Osprey fleet will fly again, with no fixes but renewed training
      Bad title for 4chin post. Too long, "no fixes" misleading, and unspecified problems with a well-characterized component that the DOD won't talk about is gossip for gays so I omitted it.
      >you morons
      Everyone but me is moronic. This is a well known fact.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Just because they are going to perform more maintenance on the aircraft and maybe change out certain parts more often doesn't mean they are changing anything on the aircraft.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does anyone have that chart showing fatalities of different USMC aircraft by flight hour?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      the guy who assembled that data actually died in an Osprey crash last year

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      For the record, I used the navy press release photo and it is in fact you who are the dastardly refried bean

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    These crashes have happened because of all the lies surrounding Osprey capabilities

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >when a blackhawk or apache crashes its no biggie
    >when an osprey crashes its because its a death trap

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      implying the homosexuals who spam heli crashes don't call it the "crash hawk"

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Marine Corps Col. Brian Taylor, the V-22 joint program manager, told reporters his office and the services “have high confidence that we understand what component failed and how it failed.” It’s still unclear why the part in question did not perform as intended.

    Taylor and other service officials declined to say which component’s failure caused an Air Force Special Operations Command Osprey to crash into the sea during a training mission Nov. 29, killing all eight airmen aboard. They also declined to answer whether the aircraft would be restricted from flying under certain conditions or in certain areas due to the risk of a repeat problem.

    The accident is still under investigation. The Air Force has shared its findings with the joint program office — which manages V-22 acquisition and maintenance for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps — and the other services to better understand the material failure that led to the crash.

    Because the wreckage of the Osprey sat under the Pacific Ocean for about a month before being recovered, the drive system is corroded such that engineers may never understand why the unnamed component failed, Taylor said. But investigators created a “fault tree” to map out potential causes, which are addressed in the services’ mitigation plan.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    THE BLOODWING DEMANDS MORE TASTY MARINES.

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