Ursa Major Draper engine for USAF

Rocket propulsion startup Ursa Major announced it successfully completed ground tests of a new liquid engine being developed for USAF. https://ursamajor.com/media/press-release/ursa-major-successfully-hotfires-its-draper-engine

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The Draper engine uses a non-cryogenic kerosene peroxide fuel combination that offers a simpler storage solution compared to engines using liquid oxygen. Non-cryogenic fuels stay liquid at room temperature and could be useful for some in-space propulsion applications like lunar landers where the propellants need to be stored for extended periods of time.

    >“Draper combines the storable attributes of a solid rocket motor with active throttle control and throttle range of a liquid engine, providing the maneuverability and flexibility that is needed for hypersonic defense,” Laurienti said.

    >“For things like responsive hypersonics interceptors, you need the ability to fly on a moment’s notice. So our propellant choice was intended to do that while preserving performance,” he said.

    >The closed cycle architecture means the kerosene can be shut off completely and the engine can run either with just hydrogen peroxide decomposed, or with peroxide and kerosene, he explained. “Draper can throttle down below 10% max power which is really nice for applications like terminal phase on hypersonics or landing on a non-terrestrial surface.”

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >non-cryogenic fuel
      't melt your face off, set you on fire, or lethally poison you in tiny doses
      rocket fighter bros we are so back

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The fuel is still quite nasty
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-test_peroxide

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >afraid of masculinity
          beta homosexual

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No, just correcting some moron's claim that it won't melt your face off.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              so can hot glue. now go and put more rhinestones on your phonecase, wienersucker.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >born too late to explore the West
                >too early to explore the stars
                >just in time to see Brilliant Pebbles actually become operational
                God I love being an American.

                It is your patriotic duty to rigorously comply with PPE requirements and conduct HazOps thoroughly. Western technological supremacy relies upon it.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >It is your patriotic duty to rigorously comply with PPE requirements and conduct HazOps thoroughly.
                did you just make this shit up because that sounds like some fricking commie gobbledyasiatic.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This would make an excellent full helmet / gas mask for a neo-feudal peasant levy (besides Russia). I will steal this idea...

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                People usually use 2 liter bottles for DIY gas masks since they are see-through. I seriously doubt any of them make a good enough seal to be useful though.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Like A Rhinestone Cowboy!

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                ur no fun

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, HTP is no joke. That said on the scale of rocket fuels it's kinda sorta in the relatively benign category? Still kinda wild to me how much shit like fuming nitric acid, dinitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine has seen operational deployment over the decades. There's a reason that UDMH-nitric acid prop mix got the name "Devil's Venom". I think that the Nadelin incident remains the deadliest rocket disaster in history. Everyone would love to never touch any of that shit ever again given the choice.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lol everyone on /k/ should grab a PDF of "Ignition!" and read it. The kind of experiments the US did in the early days of rocketry are absolutely fricking wild.
            >"Yeah, dimethyl mercury and chlorine triflouride are very interesting fuels to try out test firing!"

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              liked Ignition! (like me)? watch this then:

              >The Best Performing (and most dangerous) Chemical Rocket Ever Tested: Rocketdyne Tripropellant
              actually, I think that's exactly what you're referring to

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Not a bad rendition at all, though I think his intro verges on just a touch too light. Yeah I understand he's trying to hurry things along and keep it very high level, but even for normies I think real understanding requires a very light very high level touch on the rocket equation and the thrust/efficiency tradeoff, which are super fundamental to why Isp matters and why tradeoffs are made. Hydrolox for Earth launch (vs pure deep space usage) isn't just a dry mass issue ("additional plumbing"), or any of the other various PITA bits about hydrogen. It's that the thrust fricking sucks which means you spend more time fighting gravity and more time in the denser, far worse part of the atmosphere, both of which kill theoretical gains. The DIVH is the only one to not use solid boosters, and solids are the opposite chemical extreme, very high thrust with very shit efficiency.

                With all classical rockets the thrust/efficiency tradeoff is a fundamental challenge, like ion drives are super mega efficient but the thrust is so bad they can't even remotely touch 1g so they're for in-space use only. A rocket that combined Isp with thrust is what is commonly referred to as a "torch drive", and basically means advanced nuclear, antimatter or something along those lines. Nothing that has ever been built, though Project Orion would have qualified.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                There's no issue with generating high trust from hydrolox, see the M-1 engine. The problem is the low density and sheer size of tank required for a first stage. There's little benefit to using it for a booster that's going to be expended and jettisoned a right after launch compared to upper stages.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Fun watch, thanks anon.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous
              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >exhausts (presumably incredibly hot) anhydrous hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids.
                christ in heaven

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >exhausts (presumably incredibly hot) anhydrous hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids.
                christ in heaven

                One of the good things about this shit is it unironically kinda makes nuclear look GOOD from a safety and environmental stand point. Cheap methalox solves getting off planet, so once we're talking purely deep space transport between planets hopefully we can eventually switch away from chemical rockets for primary thrust. Though I suppose external might work in solar system as well which would be interesting infrastructure.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >critical shortage of virgins in the rocketry community
                >doubt

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                In the 1950s/60s? Was a pretty chad job at that point.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Someone recently apparently made a rocket engine using hydrogen peroxide as a fuel which is probably the most benign rocket fuel has ever been kek

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The fuel is still quite nasty
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-test_peroxide

        >T-Stoff
        >Me-163
        >Safety
        >Doubt

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >rgb lighting
    of course

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      who the frick hired corsair to make a rocket engine

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