Tungsten Disulfide Blasting

>permanently lubricates any metal or plastic
>lower friction dry than oil on uncoated metal
>improves any oil or grease used with it as it wears
>used by NASA on space shit
>industry standard coating procedure is just sandblast the part then blast the WS2 on at 120psi
Is there anything special about media blasting with half micron particles or will a $100 blasting cabinet do it well enough? I haven't been able to find much about doing this at home, let alone on a poorgay budget. If it's as simple as it sounds, you should be able to coat every moving piece of metal you own for a few hundred bucks. It'd be an excellent application for household stuff like locks, hinges, and tools, and even better for lawnmower, motorcycle, car, etc. engines.
Is there something I'm missing here or is this one of the most based materials ever?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Never heard of it until this second. Sounds interesting. Will be watching this thread for more info.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >twice the load bearing capability of oil
      >half the friction of oil
      >chemically inert
      >works at any temperature
      >half micron coating thickness won't affect any tolerances or clearances
      The Standard for application calls for a check for adhesion by wiping off any excess and putting on and pulling off a piece of tape. That gives me a little more confidence in trying a cheap setup so I'm probably gonna give it a try anyway.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've never used or applied it but I do have a lot of media blasting experience and between that and reading up on it I can say that the size of the particles will be a significant issue using generic media blasting equipment, as will the need for scrupulous cleanliness of both the work and the blast media. Regular media blasting is not a clean process.

    Even shooting media in the 220 grit range creates issues with clumping and even dispersion, and even the tiniest bit of moisture in the air makes this exponentially worse...microscopically fine powders would require lab grade drying equipment at a minimum and I doubt they are using typical nozzles and delivery.

    Also you need to separate any base material displaced by the process from the recovered media as you go, which is less and less simple as your particle sizes get smaller...and unlike typical sandblasting you can't have any stray crap in your blast stream since it's a lubricant application rather than just a textural process. So crazy filtration/separation requirements.

    Add in the fact that at least some of the descriptions use a two step blasting process; one to open up the surface at a microscopic level with a similarly fine media and another to impinge the lubricant powder into that microscopically textured surface...and both materials need to be kept 100% separate with scrupulous cleaning after step 1.

    FWIW I found a site describing a process using a tumbler and impact media as a sort of ball mill to hammer the powder into the surface of bullets...note the detailed cleaning prep process and need to keep the media clean...also consider that the lube needs of a projectile and something like an engine bearing are vastly different.

    https://www.bulletcoatings.com/guide-applying-tungsten-disulfide-bullets/

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also you need to consider consistent air flow and not just PSI when sizing equipment; 120 psi doesn't sound like much but to keep that pressure up with an open nozzle requires flowing LOTS of air which is measured in cubic feet per minute, and the demands increase exponentially as the nozzle size increases-

      "Working at 100 PSI, the recommended compressor sizes are:

      #2 1/8-inch nozzle: 20 CFM
      #3 3/16-inch nozzle: 45 CFM
      #4 1/4-inch nozzle: 81 CFM
      #5 5/16-inch nozzle: 137 CFM
      #6 3/8-inch nozzle: 196 CFM
      #7 7/16-inch nozzle: 254 CFM
      #8 1/2-inch nozzle: 338 CFM

      This one will run a 1/4" nozzle-
      >88 CFM@ 125 psi
      >$16,308.75
      >(You save $9,785.25 )
      https://www.compressorpros.com/industrial-gold-r203enc6-cdr-20-hp-208-230-three-phase-rotary-screw-air-compressor-with-dryer/

      Want a 1/2" pattern?

      https://www.compressorpros.com/201-300-cfm/

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also you need to consider consistent air flow and not just PSI when sizing equipment; 120 psi doesn't sound like much but to keep that pressure up with an open nozzle requires flowing LOTS of air which is measured in cubic feet per minute, and the demands increase exponentially as the nozzle size increases-

      "Working at 100 PSI, the recommended compressor sizes are:

      #2 1/8-inch nozzle: 20 CFM
      #3 3/16-inch nozzle: 45 CFM
      #4 1/4-inch nozzle: 81 CFM
      #5 5/16-inch nozzle: 137 CFM
      #6 3/8-inch nozzle: 196 CFM
      #7 7/16-inch nozzle: 254 CFM
      #8 1/2-inch nozzle: 338 CFM

      This one will run a 1/4" nozzle-
      >88 CFM@ 125 psi
      >$16,308.75
      >(You save $9,785.25 )
      https://www.compressorpros.com/industrial-gold-r203enc6-cdr-20-hp-208-230-three-phase-rotary-screw-air-compressor-with-dryer/

      Want a 1/2" pattern?

      https://www.compressorpros.com/201-300-cfm/

      the chad knower crushes dreams and puss with equal enthusiasm

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sim Carstairs ?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >and even the tiniest bit of moisture in the air makes this exponentially worse...microscopically fine powders would require lab grade drying equipment at a minimum
      A lot of lab-grade drying is done simply by running the gas through a tube of calcium chloride. You can get the same effect with DampRid crystals. They often use cotton balls to hold the salt in place inside the tube.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >cotton balls in the tube
        At 125 psi and flow rates in the 120+ CFM range?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          you dry the air on the inlet, not the outlet
          the pressure and flow are typically much more forgiving there

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably not more widely used due to the hazards of handling it.

    Wikipedia also states that it breaks down in contact with air together with water leaving behind Sulfuric Acid and Tungsten Oxides.

    Also Tungsten is a heavy metal and as such probably very toxic. It is simply not worth it.

    Capacity to become like one of these forever chemicals nature can not break down?

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    25kV beam voltage while trying to image surface topography, over contrasted to wash out detail while having a basically black hole in the lower left corner, zoomed in too far to see more than a few particles. Shit SEM image, my disappointment is immeasurable and my day is ruined.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I hate to be an OSHA gay but this stuff is probably nasty to mess with. Have seen laser sintering systems for 3d printing metal that have to be carried out in an airtight environment to A keep the purge gas in and B keep the powder away from peoples lungs. Someone mentioned the sulfuric acid it can produce also. Not only do you breathe this stuff in, but it acid burns up the inside of your lungs in the process. Im just a layman, but it sounds pretty OP if workable in a DIY setting and has the properties listed.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      doesn't seem so bad:

      https://www.acsmaterial.com/pub/media/catalog/product/file/SDS-Tungsten_Disulfide_WS2_.pdf

      you're not much of an osha gay if you didn't even think to look it up

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