tell me about the ghost bat? are manned aircraft on the way out?

tell me about the ghost bat? are manned aircraft on the way out?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >are manned aircraft on the way out?
    men cant handle the same G's that circuitry can, and no fleshy pilot dies when the craft goes down.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      People always seem to focus on what drones can do better than humans and completely forget what humans can do better than drones.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Which is exactly why the program is called "loyal wingman" it's a drone that's meant to accompany a human-piloted fighter.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Aren't drones still much dumber than human pilots? I can see them being used as fodder to help distract enemy AA/air fleets, but at least for the next generation they're basically roger-rogers who'd only beat a half-competent human-piloted fighter through attrition.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What part of remote piloting aren't you understanding?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          remote piloting just creates the possibility that the drone can be jammed or otherwise fooled

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      From the moment I understood the weakness of my flesh, it disgusted me.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >laughs in 1957 white paper

    Sure. Manned aircraft are on their way out. Any century now…

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Anon, I want you to think critically here. Do you think there are more drones involved in combat today than in 1957, or fewer?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >more corvettes are now in service compared to 1957

        This clearly means that destroyers are obsolete.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Anon, I want you to think critically here. Do you think there are more drones involved in combat today than in 1957, or fewer?
        As you are new to this shit down and learn. Drone were being used for critical attacks in WW2 that were not very differrent conceptually to the cruise missiles in ww2

        https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a28312/wwii-drone-strike-tdr-1/
        The TDR-1 had a cockpit that allowed it to be flown like a conventional aircraft to battle zones. Once there, the aircraft was fitted with a half-ton aircraft bomb. The aircraft had a television camera in the nose, brand-new technology at the time. A crewman in the Avenger could receive the crude TV signals to to locate a target and then direct the bomber to bomb the target—or crash into it.

        https://www.smithsonianmag.com/air-space-magazine/drone-strike-180964753/

        This is my favorite

        Operation Aphrodite, the 1944 US operation to use radio-controlled B-17 bombers packed with explosives to destroy huge German bunkers.

        >. Do you think there are more drones involved in combat today than in 1957, or fewer?
        The correct answer is I don't know. Neither do you. Could actually be more there were vast ww2 stocks that could have been converted to drones.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Could actually be more there were vast ww2 stocks that could have been converted to drones
          you're a sore loser and anyone with more than 2 brain cells to rub together knows there are far more drones in 2022 than there have been in any other point in history.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Really? The cold war was full tilt in 1957 and the entire stock of WW2 arms was available. You asked 'how many'.......

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              if you actually think that was possible in that era, you're a retard.

              Were they testing that shit in secret? Sure. Were they flying hundreds or thousands of them? Not a fucking snowballs chance in hell you delusional gay.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I fucking love orange trim on prototypes and trainers.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You still need a guidance control ~~*near*~~ them.

    >manned stealth jet flies 500km away from enemy
    >has a wingman of 3 drones that each that fly around the pilot
    >pair of wingman drone flies in formation but 200 km (vs 500 for human) within enemy target
    >last drone alies close to human to give another anchor
    >sensors from drone is relayed to human pilot who can approve of targets to fire, and the drones would engage the targets

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why?

      It's not like you need less than 5-10ms latency. Starlink can provide global sub ~200ms latency to any decision-making that needs to be done.

      There is little difference between a pilot 500km away and a pilot 4500km away.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Disruption in communications between drones/human on ground would force drones to good line of sight beamed com transmitters.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Fantasy, also the whole point of the ghost bat concept is that it can make decisions without any input at all from a human once it's set to follow it's mission profile.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Ideally, yes. But contingencies maybe something military may want. If only to keep the humans in the loop for the forseeable future. Once the system proves itself completely, they can discard the humans

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah like a self driving car. pay no attention to the fact that self driving cars fucking suck and we'll only have something close to them working properly off of a flat track in southern california in 80 years

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >80 years
              In less than 20, we went from "there is no fucking way" to "we can get them to drive around cities for 5 minutes at a time before needing human intervention". Thanks to the hundreds of early adopters beta testing it, we could probably see self-driving somewhat usable by 2030, reliable by 2040, and nearly flawless by 2050.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What if we train a rat to pilot the drone, so when someone tries to jam or hack the drone, the rat takes over?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The ultimate idea is that they can't be hacked in the first place because there is no one controlling it from the start. It's doing the entire mission autonomously and making any decisions that need to be made itself.

      How do you hack something remotely that isn't listening to remote commands in the first place?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        any closed circuit can be manipulated. binary injection for example which can even be done remotely, without hard taps. if nothing works, and there are a lot of things to try, then you jam an actuator and pitch it into the ground or fucking fry it. EMSEC goes far beyond sniffing or hardline tap and hack, it can be done remotely now. the F53 features all of these capabilities which is the real reason nato countries are buying them. it doesn't shoot other planes and ground targets, it hacks them. it's a flying wizard, and now they have packaged all that into a pod that can be mounted on older planes.
        there is no going back.
        war in the future will be about coordinating and arranging enough resources to penetrate a peer system, because you all have this level now. it will be temporary, and your army will have to pick objectives. there won't be steamrolling invasions the way desert storm happened, computerized defense systems have insured that. the only way to defeat a flechette defense system is to fry it before it shreds your assets and your bombs and missiles.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          This is pure fantasy, I'm an IT security specialist as a career, and sure I don't do super top secret military level shit, but you're delusional if you honestly think the MQ-28 will be susceptible to the kind of attack you're imagining. There are SO many simple ways to stop that from happening at all in a fully autonomous platform like is described for this drone.

          The developers would have to be legitimately retarded to leave openings like you're talking about.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Holy shit you are beyond retarded.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >tfw the rats rebel
      >tfw hiding under a thermal blanket while squadrons of rat stealth fighters drop JDAMs on your position

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      B. F Skinner?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes YES!

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mannnedd planes will do be on the way out when AI gets good enough to complete the mission when comms/satlink are down.

    At that point a pilot will be more of a liability than an asset.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Test platform only. Can't carry weapons. I'm waiting for a bigger version to be announced.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The war in Ukraine has highlighted the desperate need for AShM drones. Which would require a large platform as AShM's are quite a bit more complicated and you'd probably need half a dozen at least.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes technically but No politically.
    All senior AF Generals are ex-pilots - they all still delude themselves with the "man-in-the-loop" lie to justify their existence.
    MQ-28 is a "Wingman"
    Like Mav/Ice-man because its homo-erotic how hard AF Generals ass-fuck UCAVs taking over from pilots.
    E.g. RAAF actually cancelled a confirmed Triton order to buy P-8s with a fraction of the endurance because "muhPilotz"

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Drones are going to take over air and sea warfare because they are simply too efficient and economical in terms of logistics. You can have a plane patrol for years (like the X37) in low orbit or a ship/submarine do the same.
    There will probably still always be some manned ships and aircrafts as a contigency plan if the software or comms fail but it will probably be 10 to 1.

    I believe land warfare is the last thing that will largely remain human (which makes sense because we're evolutionary adapted for land hunting/warfare).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I feel more and more sorry for infantry as weapon tech develops

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >are manned aircraft on the way out?
    On the contrary the mission requirements for pilots are going to become more complex and critical, they are going to be COs of the air with a small drone army.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >are manned aircraft on the way out?
    tom_cruise_top_gun_maverick_not_today_.jpg

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I remember some noise about an autonomous loitering munition, did anything come from that?

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In all likelihood, these drones will be used as sort of a "mobile missile rack" where a small wing would accompany an F35 and then the F35 pilot would be able to take more ordinance and could remotely launch missiles from the drones, use data from the drones' combined radar and sensor package.
    More firepower per human pilot, basically.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're also supposed to sacrifice themselves to take a missile hit for the F-35 if the F-35 were to be targeted.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Le drone can handle more G forces!

    Hate this stupid meme.

    1. G-loading is less important in modern combat
    2. G-loading is mostly not limited by the pilot, but by the airframe.
    An airframe that can regularly pull 15G is going to have to be very heavy and in order to sustain those high G-forces would require a stupendous thrust to weight ratio.
    it's really not a good trade-off especially in modern warfare.
    The USN for example, limits their jets to 7.5 to extend their airframe life, pilots can hold 9G and even further in short bursts.

    the real advantages in drones are in the economics of removing the pilot, increased endurance and the weight/space saving.
    that's why typically these drones are small as they get a big advantage from losing the weight and space of the cockpit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Hate this stupid meme.
      Yeah it pisses me off too. The vast majority of the retards on this board just parrot other dumb shit they see other anons posting and never actually learn anything. Almost every thread is just the same three or four talking points repeated with anything to the contrary being labeled as the work of shills.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nobody is counting the Gs when maneuvering in a combat situation

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No but good unmanned drones will be great. Good potential to kill an enemy pilot while not risking your own pilot? It's just more good shit for SEAD/DEAD.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This has already been debated, wargames proved the AI pilot will dominate human pilots in maneuvering strategies alone, not even factoring in the physical disadvantage a human pilot would have over a machine pulling X more amount of G's, it's pretty obvious. Elon Musk was right, fighter pilots are obsolete (if not fodder). If you are thinking about becoming a pilot for combat, i'd suggest going army instead, learn real fighting skills.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it'll definitely be a while before manned aircraft are entirely obsolete, particularly jet fighters. the main issue is that AI hasn't become advanced enough yet that it can entirely replace the human brain's tendency toward randomness, creativity, and craftiness that can give jet pilots the edge. right now, most "fighter" UAVs are controlled are coordinated by the pilot or team that flies manned aircraft, with maybe one exception being the Iranian Karrar drone.

    personally I think almost all modern CAS aircraft will become unmanned within our lifetimes. shit like Su-25's, A-10's, and heli gunships just seem too big and too vulnerable without having too many big advantages over UAVs. looking at Ukraine as an example, Su-25s fly sorties where they basically "spray and pray" shoot unguided rockets from a standoff distance at targets to avoid risking themselves in IADS. a drone could easily do the same thing while also having less potential loss risk in more dangerous skies since it wouldn't have a pilot with expensive training inside of it.

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