So this is my bathroom right now. I would like to put in a epoxy floor ( or something similar).

So this is my bathroom right now.
I would like to put in a epoxy floor ( or something similar).
I couldn't care less if the resulting floor is the most perfectly straight floor in existence.

Can somebody give me a quick run down of the process and general feasibility?

My plan would be this:
fill up that hole with sand or gravel and put something like a 10+ cm section of concrete on top so it's flush with the current floor.
Current floor is very old tiles, i guess.
They're more akin to flat bricks.
Best case scenario would be that i just dump allot of epoxy on top to i have something like a 2 cm pool that self levels.

When I look this up i mostly get told that this is basically impossible.

the proper workflow would be this:
Fill up the hole. Use insane amounts of epoxy filler to create a perfectly level floor. Use some sort of epoxy floor primer. Use some special adhesion enhancing compound and then put on the actual epoxy floor compound.

I feel like they just want to shill me products.
But honestly I don't know.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fill the hole like you said then just use some self levelling screed. Epoxy over the top of that.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      nice, that sounds reasonable

      https://i.imgur.com/rclKnjZ.jpg

      Just make the epoxy river floor bro, I already made you a thumbnail

      and thanks to you too,
      this will finally be the quality content my youtube channel needs !

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just make the epoxy river floor bro, I already made you a thumbnail

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Doing it yourself SUCKS.
    The fumes really got to me.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A1 respirator filter works for epoxy fumes. Been there.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Look up a product called Ardex

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I do polymer floors professionally
    You want to put in the concrete and then grind the floor as smooth as possible

    Then you need a thickened epoxy spread with a notched squeegee at least 10 mils thick (the squeegees will tell you how many mils they put down at) load your roller and back roll smooth

    If you have any bubbles, sand smooth and fill the tint holes that created the bubbles with cheap latex caulking or anything that dries fast that's thick enough to hold your next coat from making more bubbles

    Then, you need to do another layer of epoxy something like 20mils thick. You can use a gauge rake or if you can find a proper 20mil squeegee, use that.

    Make sure this coat is slow curing epoxy so it levels out

    From there, you'll probably need to roll on a coat with non-skid (unless the whole floor will be covered with rugs) or the floor will be stupid dangerous when wet

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You want 100% solids epoxy so you don't get outgassing (bubbles)

      And that will mean any bubbles on the prime coat are pin holes in the concrete which is why you need to plug them.

      To thicken the prime coat, you can use some cabosil or extender T or fine paper fiber. You want it to be as thick as cheap fake syrup. It needs to settle itself out but not so quick you get so many bubbles. It shouldn't take much thickener, but without the thickening agent, you'll have 1000 bubbles

      The pic is what your squeegee for your second coat needs to be if you want any chance at getting it smooth

      It'd be way easier to throw plastic down and put LVT on top of it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I do polymer floors professionally
        You want to put in the concrete and then grind the floor as smooth as possible

        Then you need a thickened epoxy spread with a notched squeegee at least 10 mils thick (the squeegees will tell you how many mils they put down at) load your roller and back roll smooth

        If you have any bubbles, sand smooth and fill the tint holes that created the bubbles with cheap latex caulking or anything that dries fast that's thick enough to hold your next coat from making more bubbles

        Then, you need to do another layer of epoxy something like 20mils thick. You can use a gauge rake or if you can find a proper 20mil squeegee, use that.

        Make sure this coat is slow curing epoxy so it levels out

        From there, you'll probably need to roll on a coat with non-skid (unless the whole floor will be covered with rugs) or the floor will be stupid dangerous when wet

        thanks for the indepth infos.
        that actually does sound like epoxy isn't the right approach here.
        I think I'll start by filling int he hole and cleaning the floor properly.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Would that polymer suit outdoor use on a steel roof? I've a shipping container (next time I'll buy another one-trip not WWT garbage) I'd like to coat once and have last twenty years.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pour self leveling concrete over everything, then add your floor

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This but fill everything deep with regular concrete first

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