So question to anyone who owns and uses a 119. Would this be a good outdoor hiking/camping knife?

So question to anyone who owns and uses a 119. Would this be a good outdoor hiking/camping knife? Not for really hard use but I guess just having on it on your side for backup. Ive always wanted one but haven't pulled the trigger yet.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's more of a dedicated hunting knife than a camp knife, be being a hollow ground clip point and all. Doesn't stop people from using it as such though, and from what I've seen it'll hold up to it.
    Might make a better hiking knife with it barely weighing anything, but it depends on what you're doing with it

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ive used it for cooking and splitting wood which is basically what youll use it for
    Just dont be a retard and hit it right on the point and itll be just fine

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      its a good hunting knife.
      no its not a good camp knife, only a serviceable one. if its not a drop point it can't be a good camp knife. simple as.

      and don't ever pry with it etc etc. clip point ain't for camp knife tasks.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >if its not a drop point it can't be a good camp knife. simple as.
        That's commie bullshit if I've ever heard it

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's kind of old school in that it's fairly heavy for what it is. Also the handle is rather slick for my liking, I prefer a rougher grip. But other than that it's fine. If you like it try one, you won't find a cheaper way to scratch the big ass buck knife itch.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I wouldn't choose that knife. It is too large and have for a general purpose knife and 420HC steel sucks. I know they've made it in other steels but not sure what.

    In that price range something like an Ontario RAT-3 or RAT-5 are better choices. Decent carbon steel, better handles, better ergos.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Get the 120. Mine turns 32 this year.

      Quit talking out of your ass, boy.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wow, a 32 year old knife that has maybe been sharpened once.

        Wares that sit unused all "perform" the same.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's burnt to shit because it goes unused, right? Idiot

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Used as a fire poker but not as a knife. Good "thinking".

            Anyway, ignore the guy who has never cut anything with his knife in 32 years. He could have just used a stick he found on the ground.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You're one funny fucker ain't ya. Cheers

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The good: Decent steel, hollow ground for cutting animal tissues, easily cleaned, not too heavy. Many deer have been processed with the 119 over the decades.

    The bad: The high temper makes the blade fragile, the handle is indeed slippery when wet, the blade is too thick for an honest meat cutting knife.

    For hunting, I'd choose a hundred other knives over this one. I wouldn't want this to be the knife I end up with in a survival situation. I'm a fan of Buck knives but this doesn't check many boxes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What would you use instead for hunting? What kind of features do you look for?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Take two knives and make sure they're wicked sharp when you start cutting the animal. I'd recommend a replaceable blade knife like Outdoor Edge for cutting through the hide (hair dulls a blade fast), It's just a lot faster to replace a dull blade than sharpen it. You could almost quarter a whole deer with a replaceable blade but skinning is easier with a knife with a deep belly, and cutting through heavy ligaments is easier with a larger blade.

        A good hunting knife has a hollow grind for cutting meat, a deep belly for skinning, and a nice sharp point like a clip point for delicate cutting. It has a grippy handle because blood is really slippery, but it should be easy to clean (an old toothbrush can help get blood out of a handle). A four inch blade is long enough for deer and elk.

        If you can afford a knife with a modern steel like S30V or S35VN (and if it's shaving sharp when you start cutting) it won't need to be sharpened halfway through the job.

        I use a Buck 110 folding hunter light as much as I can and then switch to a Buck 656 Pursuit Pro for skinning, quartering, or boneless pack outs. The worst thing you will have to deal with when dressing and quartering is a dull blade, that's why I take two knives.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nearly all the alloy tool steels will make it through butchering something the size of a whitetail without needing to be sharpened if it is well heat treated. My oldest game knife is made from D2 and I've field dressed and boned out 2 decent sized midwest does without sharpening.

          Hollow grinds are nice but not that easy to find. They help get thick blade stock thin behind the bevel, like the Buck 120 boob up above has. But if you just don't bother with that thick ass stock in the first place a full flat grind works as well or better.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Here are mine. Minus the axe, and the shovel/saw/axe/knife multitool i have

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No not really. A good outdoors knife has a scandi grind. That looks like a saber or hollow grind which isn't very good at working with wood. It also has that dumb handle guard which just gets in the way. You should buy a cheap mora and use it for a while until you know what you want in a knife.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >A good outdoors knife has a scandi grind.
      Ha no.

      A Scandi is fine if you don't have an axe or a saw and will need to knife large pieces of wood. But if you won't need to, or have the right tools for it, you don't need Scandi since it is inferior at everything else you might want to do with a knife.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The scandi is the best grind for doing anything with wood. It's the best camping knife. It's not great for processing food or skinning animals obviously. But there's really no grind that's good at both which is why I usually bring two knives with me.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >It's the best camping knife.
          No it isn't.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yes it is

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              An excellent point.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buck makes good stuff, Buck 420hc steel is just fine. It'll last a lifetime unless you are doing retarded shit like batonny, that being said I think there are a lot of better knives for less money nowadays. I have a 119, I never use it because I have so many other knives that I prefer to use, but everyone has different tastes when it comes to knives and I am sure there are people out there that absolutely love the 119 and would chose it over others.

    There isn't any one best grind, scandi is fine but it definitely gets pushed as the best way too often. It is probably the strongest because it has the most meat near the cutting edge and the easiest to sharpen because you can easily hold the correct angle even if you are inexperienced at sharpening. Personally I like hollow grinds and scandi.

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