sleeping bag alternatives while?

The thought of trying to enjoy my slumber in a sleeping bag on top of a blow up mattress which has a synthetic lining/shell really triggers my autism. Both are products of modernity, and redditfags always shill gear. I mean, people slept in primitive shelters in the winter with nothing but a wool blanket before we had sleeping bags. What are some viable alternatives for sleeping in 0f+ weather without freezing to death? bedrolls look pretty cool and cozy. some context: I will be sleeping in a tent with Smartwool base layer

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just use a wool blanket and a down pillow. no sleeping bag/pad necessary. alternatively, you can read up on how insulation works.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >down pillow
      sounds bad

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Both are products of modernity
    Other products of modernity:
    >(You)
    >the internet
    >this image board
    >digital photographs
    >PCs/smartphones
    >Smartwool
    >the concept of sleeping outdoors for recreation
    >the concept of recreation, period (for non-aristocrats)
    All that being said, I sympathize with your plight. We love the outdoors, so we wish to return to monke and to Stone Age ways and sensibilities insofar as we're able. Current research has shown that tribal men were tall, healthy Chads (unless stranded on a small island for generations; all species slowly shrink when isolated in this way; look up pygmy mammoths and the Sentinelese), and that agriculture and its consequences (serving aristocrats, the industrial revolution, etc.) degenerated men into diseased, inbred, retarded manlets, e.g. Europeans prior to the 20th century.

    If you wish to camp in a new location each night, there are few viable alternatives to the pad and bag. Ultralight folding cots exist, but are expensive and break at the drop of a hat. Hammocks exist, but hammockfags only put theirs up to snap a picture to post on PrepHole (they actually sleep in bags on pads).

    The one thing I can suggest to you is to try making some sort of bough mattress, if feasible in your area. This sucks to do every night, unfortunately, because it's time-consuming. Other than that, bedroll is the only other way.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I figured someone would point out my somewhat contradicting statements on modernity while still using a tent and stuff. my point was that sleeping bags are such a new thing in the grand scheme of things, it’s not necessary yet everyone uses it since it makes sleeping in the cold easy. They’re very light compared to something like a bedroll and you have insulation surrounding you. It’s just an easy way out of something (which is one of the many problems of modernity) they’re so common place I was curious in what the alternatives are that don’t involve killing a bear with a bow and arrow and wrapping myself in its flesh for the sake of muh primitivism. But yes, you’re right. I should probably just buy a bedroll.

      https://i.imgur.com/xmntUuO.jpg

      >synthetic lining/shell really triggers my autism
      >I will be sleeping in a tent with Smartwool base layer

      Not sure what you’re implying is contradictory. If you’re referring to the smartwool base layer, it’s made out of 100% wool you retard. If you’re somehow making the argument that having a tent made out of synthetic fabric (which isn’t wrapped close to my entire body and making direct contact) is contradictory, you’re still a retard.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >you retard
        >you're still a retard
        >triggers my autism

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Not sure what you’re implying is contradictory. If you’re referring to the smartwool base layer, it’s made out of 100% wool you retard.
        nope anon is 100% correct, smartwool's 100% wool is treated with a process called superwash where its coated in plastic to make it machine washable and not itch. look it up. that's what the "smart" in their name stands for.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          damn and i just bought a pair :/ never had problems with itchy wool, just got them instead of darn tough socks because they had my foot size in stock.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Hammocks exist, but hammockfags only put theirs up to snap a picture to post on PrepHole (they actually sleep in bags on pads).
      I sleep in a hammock every night inside my own home. Once you get adjusted to it, hammock sleeping is by FAR the best way to sleep.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I sleep in a hammock every night inside my own home. Once you get adjusted to it, hammock sleeping is by FAR the best way to sleep.
        That was my "acting like a gay on purpose" answer. Here is my real answer: I like hammocks, and once considered one as my primary home sleeping mechanism. However, they do require hefty support in the form of trees; the only alternatives are heavy, bulky artificial supports, which may be in the form of driving big, sturdy branches deep into the soil, but this also requires trees. I'm an Appalachian boy myself so that's fine for me, but it's no good above the treeline, anywhere trees are too sparse, scrubby, or twisted, in many arid regions, etc.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Down is natural. Hand sew a down bag using cotton ticking.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Or bring a ticking shell/bag thing that you fill with dry grasses and leaves to make an insulated blanket. Sleep under it on a canvas sheet, and boughs or dry grasses under the canvas.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Kill a bear. Brain tan the hide. This is your blanket. Legally change your name to Grug.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Invent fire. The wheel comes much later.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    that picture is irritating,

    tripod over fire, wearing loaded pack with axe in hand, it doesnt make sense.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      and knife handle under hip strap. that looks so uncomfortable.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Hip strap isn't done up.

        that picture is irritating,

        tripod over fire, wearing loaded pack with axe in hand, it doesnt make sense.

        It's clearly a staged photo.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Look at his fucking hip belt.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      We must find this poseur and eliminate it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I know its a staged pic, the irritation is that the effort in staging it was so low.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >synthetic lining/shell really triggers my autism
    >I will be sleeping in a tent with Smartwool base layer

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      To be fair, he didn't say it triggered his intelligence

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Man i havent seen this pic in a while. Nice digits

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    clothes

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've been to a couple of rendezvous and was impressed by the strict adherence to using materials available in the 1840s. Sleeping systems were all made of wool, cotton, various hides and furs, and dry grasses. Tents, lodges (tipis) and lean-tos were made of canvas. This all weighed a ton but back then everything was carried or pulled by horses. Nobody backpacked in 1840. My guess is that if you were unfortunate enough to have to travel on foot, you either slept in an inn or somebody's cabin, or carried the heaviest wool blanket you could manage -- and you didn't travel in cold weather. I'm talking about white man here; the native americans were pros at ignoring the cold. Mandans walked around barefoot in the winter. They were just that hardcore.

    So unless you have a horse you're stuck with camping only when the nights are relatively warm. That's pretty doable if you spend a few hundred on a nice wool blanket.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe bring one of these along with your wool blanket. And every time you're supposed to go to sleep you fill it up with pine twigs or something.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      for ground insulation you can sleep on reindeer pelt when it gets colder, though in the temperature where using a wool blanket is fine you probably dont need very much insulation, just get something to sleep on like this

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >muh wool blanket

    There are three categories of people using wool blankets:
    >has used a sleeping bag or quilt, but now uses a wool blanket. Has first hand knowledge of how shitty it is
    >has only ever used a wool blanket. Has no idea how shitty it is.
    >has never used a wool blanket. Has no idea how shitty it is.

    As you can see, the groups who have never used a wool blanket, and therefor don’t know how terrible it is compared to a bag or quilt, outnumber the people with first hand knowledge.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >hi

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >0 °F
    >larp gear only
    >cozy

    Woods arctic down robe replica with overstuff, that's around 150 years old if that is old enough.

    For ground insulation build a small collapsible bionic wooden bedframe with down insulation integrated under the canvas.
    Furs might also be an option, but I think at those temps you would need multiple pelts to prevent the heat from going into the ground too fast.

    Will probably be 10 lbs total just for your sleep system that way, but a wool blanket setup would be around 15 lbs for those temps and less comfy, and modern gear will be 3-4 lbs

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Gonna hijack this thread because you seems knowleable enough. Do you reckon I can make an zero degree sleeping bag suitable for -15 by adding vapor barrier and/or fleece liner(s)?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >le vapor barrier
        You can sleep in thermals, add a liner and put a bivy on the outside of it. It'll have more insulation, you'll sleep better and you won't be an obnoxious gay

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What's with the attitude? Just asking a question.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            First day?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I only pretended to be knowledgeable.
        Regarding your question, I'm afraid the added insulation is not enough and you may need a warmer bag.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >on top of a blow up mattress which has a synthetic lining/shell really triggers my autism.
    > I will be sleeping in a tent with Smartwool base layer
    you're still sleeping with your entire body covered in synthetic material.
    smartwool is all coated in plastic. its a nylon polymer resin called hercosett 125 to make it machine washable https://woolful.com/fiber-conscious-superwash-wool/ here's an article on it.
    you will need new base layers to sleep in if you don't want to sleep in synthetics. most, but not all merino wool is coated in synthetics and not natural at all.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Not sure what you’re implying is contradictory. If you’re referring to the smartwool base layer, it’s made out of 100% wool you retard.
      nope anon is 100% correct, smartwool's 100% wool is treated with a process called superwash where its coated in plastic to make it machine washable and not itch. look it up. that's what the "smart" in their name stands for.

      I knew smartwool processed their wool in a certain kind of way, I never really looked into it. Thanks for bringing it to my attention. I guess there’s really no escape from micro plastics. Even “100% wool” isn’t truly all wool.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        damn and i just bought a pair :/ never had problems with itchy wool, just got them instead of darn tough socks because they had my foot size in stock.

        imo there's no good all natural solution for socks.
        if you want to avoid superwash, its far less common in alpaca socks than merino. some alpaca socks are treated but they tend not to be. pretty much every alpaca sock will be synthetic blended because of the fiber length though.
        you can avoid superwash but IMO the 10% of nylon or whatever that they put in most hiking sock blends is unavoidable. it might work out for someone who's rich and doesn't hike long distance, but 100% merino socks fall apart fast. they don't put nylon in these blends for no reason.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >people slept in primitive shelters in the winter with nothing but a wool blanket
    A large % also died before their first birthday.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What kind of gay chud way of packing is this? I sure do hope it's a stock photo or a retard californian because if you pack like this you might aswell chop your dick and balls and hang it next to your wool blanket you massive whore

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >stock photo
      yeah looks like an ad for the backpack since its the only logo on the whole image

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just get a rectangle sleeping bag instead of a mummy bag
    old-school look, more room for legs, zip all the open and use as blanket, leave the bottom zipped and use as a pointy foot pocket

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      testing

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the reason you see synthetic blended into natural material socks isn't to cheapen them. you'll find synthetic in the blend for the most expensive fibers on the market every time. the reason is because a lot of these natural fibers that have desirable properties for PrepHole like merino and such have short fiber lengths which make it so you have to blend them to make structurally strong garments out of. stuff like socks and gloves have to be pretty strong. you can get away without it in stuff like a shirt or hat.
    the best cope, at least for me, is just taking the realistic approach that the xenoestrogen health concern isn't really from skin contact its from the garment winding up in fish bellies and then the food supply. i do whatever i can to extend the life of every synthetic garment i own, then diy + upcycle once its life is over, if possible, so i can get the most use as possible before it contributes to polluting le ocean.

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    and its not like harvesting and processing merino is eco friendly at all. i say the 10% nylon they put in stuff like darn tough is likely a net good from an eco perspective because it greatly extends the life of the wool part of the garment, which involves very bad for the environment chemical processing to make washable & sort of torturing an animal to make.

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i can hold you all night instead anon

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      ew i have a stepsister

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