Sleeping?

What are your sleeping setups when going PrepHole? I've always slept directly on the ground with just a sleeping bag (in a tent ofc), and I only just now realized why I never slept well while camping.
That being said, why are sleeping pads so expensive? I might as well get a cot if I'm gonna pay that much for an airbag. Are they really worth it?

inb4 the hammock bros show up

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sportz trek self inflating, worth every cent

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >inb4 the hammock bros show up
    I’m here already. It’s have aground setup as well, which I had to put together for an AT section hike, and also used in Big Bend in southwest Texas. A ground pad is absolutely necessary, but you might be able to get away with a ccf pad. It’s not as comfy as an inflatable, but much cheaper.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I feel more vulnerable in a hammock than I do in a tent.
      and you can't have sex in it either

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I feel vulnerable
        ngmi
        >can’t have sex in a hammock
        Girl simply lets you do it dead starfish style, huh?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I actually feel more vulnerable in a tent. You can get huge tarps that cover you like a tent while you are suspended off the ground in your hammock. Its super comfortable especially when you have a nice top and under quilt insulation system.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >bugs go now nom nom

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >bug net clearly visible
        How new are you? Be honest.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hammock bros never run from a scrap!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What do you think of this one. Labor day sale and not a poorfag anymore.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It’s not bad. The hammock is 10’ long, so it’s a question of your height. The usable space of a hammock is determined by its length rather than its width.

        Pros:
        -reputable brand
        -attached bug net
        -integrated ridge line
        -complete setup
        -mid tie outs on the tarp rather than just the corners
        -not excessively heavy
        -tie outs on the hammock body
        -good price on the hammock and tarp combo ($200)

        Cons:
        -too short if your tall
        -flat edge on the tarp instead of cat cut
        -$128 for the pad is a little much
        -no panel pulls for pole mod

        If you’re still Nader 5’ 9” the hammock and tarp combo seems like a decent price. I’d skip the pad and just pay more for an underquilt (price varies by temperature; a 40° JRB Shenandoah is like $180).

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you ever sleep below 40 degrees then cots are not going to cut it. You'll feel incredibly cold underneath.

    I sleep with my gf together on two Big Agnes pads that are strapped together using a coupling strap. In the summer we'll use a quilt and in the winter we'll each be in our own sleeping bags.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Got a link to the quilt and/or pads? Sounds comfy

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://www.rei.com/used/p/big-agnes-insulated-air-core-ultra-sleeping-pad/169934?color=Orange&aqi=a6bf9bbd5c6a3e248942010e003a15df

        https://www.rei.com/used/p/rei-co-op-magma-trail-quilt-30/148793?color=Asphalt&aqi=d9fbb72d55a4313fc027e7978dbeb70e

        You can buy them new too if you wish

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Damn, over $300. Camping truly isn't a poor-mans hobby. Is it even comfy to lay directly on the pad itself?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It's all right. I'm a side sleeper so it's all about getting my hip bone off the ground. But the pad can be very uncomfortable if you fully inflate it, so you have to release some air. Ultimately it's not as comfy as a cot, but much more lightweight and warm. Cots are heavy af.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Camping truly isn't a poor-mans hobby.
            Anything requiring spare time is a rich man's hobby.

            But back to the point, I used a blue closed cell sleeping pad until I was 35. Then my hips and shoulders asked for something comfier. I now use a thick Thermarest Luxury Map. Massively expensive, but I can now afford it.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            if you're a poorfag just get an aliexpress fake zlite for $25 just make sure its one of the ones with the reflective half they're all the same.
            or a real one for $50 if you're in a hurry.
            then save up $200 for an inflatable or just use the zlite forever. the first time i popped my inflatable in a non field repairable way i stopped using them except in the winter. you don't NEED a $200-300 inflatable outside of winter and alpine backpacking, and even then its just a weight savings thing, its just a luxury.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It isn't?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I use a lightweight 2-person free standing tent, a wide inflatable pad (Big Agnes and Paria Outdoors make comfy ones), a down quilt rated lower than it needs to be, and a compressible foam pillow. It's heavier and bulkier than some ultralight setups, but I'm very comfy down to 20F as a side sleeper.

    It can get to -20F here so I don't camp during winter.

    If you're worried about money look into the Paria Outdoors Recharge XL pad. They're out of stock ATM, but they're $100 which isn't terrible.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pad on ground. I like putting some spruce branches under it just to get some more air in between. Then i got my sleeping bag and a woolen blanket on top of it, very cozy during winter!

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hammock initiate here. I'm quite nervous about my setup because temperatures are dropping (although it's still hot during the day) and I have a DD hammock with an underblanket, plus a Carinthia Eagle sleeping bag. Of course I have a tarp too. I'm afraid it will be too lightweight by the time I actually get to go on a weekend.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The DD under blanket is a really nice and durable piece of kit. It will keep you warm. Your sleeping bag probably wont do you any good if you plan on sleeping at or below 10 C. You should get a warmer topquilt to pair with your underblanket. The Hammock Gear Economy Burrow is the best budget quilt. Also does your tarp have doors at the head and foot ends? All cold temperature hammock tarps have doors to block cold drafts at the head and foot ends. Your tarp will become a cold wind tunnel and render a warm underquilt and topquilt useless.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don't think there will be -10C, at least not until winter (I won't go innawoods this coming winter, I'm just not equipped yet). I'll get a bigger sleeping bag eventually. I think the worst will be around 0C.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I didn't say -10 I said 10 and below. Its not going to be enjoyable anywhere near 10 degrees. 0 degrees and you would call it quits an hour into the night.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I understood "below 10" as -10. Aww crap. My sleeping bag is rated for that temp range though. Up to -5. As for the tarp I have a 3x3, surely I can arrange that in a way that works?
            If I'll have to buy top insulation I'm afraid I'll have to give up the idea of bivvying outside until next Spring at least.
            Should I risk it or am I going to die of hypothermia?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For summer I use a nemo tensor pad and an ee quilt, I have a two person one as well if my gf is with me.
    Winter I have an exped downmat 9 and a ff expedition bag.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    /out/ie

    A size chart of sleeping mats, the big names have the same sizes.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >That being said, why are sleeping pads so expensive? I might as well get a cot if I'm gonna pay that much for an airbag. Are they really worth it?
    cots weigh 10lbs so they're unusable for backpacking.
    sleeping pads weigh less than a pound for even heavy winter pads.
    if you're on a budget buy a foam pad. they get as cheap as the $6 wal mart blue foam pads all the way up to like $50 for a zlite which is what most foam users use.
    if you later move onto inflatables you can actually stack the foam pad underneath the inflatable and combine r values for a budget winter setup.
    if you're car camping... just get a cot i guess? nothing you do really matters car camping, do whatever feels good.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What are your sleeping setups when going PrepHole?
    polycryo or tyvek ground sheet depending on how rocky the area is -> thinlite foam -> foam pad -> optional bivy (winter) or bug bivy (bug season) -> mummy bag -> tarp
    first year using this setup, before this i used a tarp tent hexamid clone.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've slept a couple of times now while traveling straight up outside.
    I sleep on a foampad, in a sleeping bag that's placed in a very lightweight water-proof bivvy that I also store my stuff in between the sleeping bag and the bivvy (bivvy is bigger than sleeping bag so there is space to store stuff). I quite like it, doesn't take much setup, feels nice, only downside is absolutley no privacy and the fucking wind man I made that mistake once sleeping in a relativley open area when it was a cold night.
    It's quite normal to wake up and see some lovely insects who decided to use the sleeping bag for shelter for the night...
    Though if I'm not trying to save weight or if I'm doing a longer trek/camping trip or if I want some privacy due to a popular place I bring a tent and take away the bivvy (or keep it for extra warmth layer if needed).
    Foam pads are a must honestly man, you should get one, very very lightweight and they're sooo much more comfortable than sleeping on ground, plus they don't cost much and they can take a hell of a beating unlike inflatable pads.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      can you recommend a decent bang for buck foam mat? in order of importance
      weight (must be light)
      comfort (doesn't need to be plush but a bit of cushioning would be nice)
      cost (under £50)

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Unironically bubble wrap.
        Get a 750mm roll and cut 3 sheets to the length you want, light as a feather, cheap as chips, more comfy than a foam mat and much easier to carry. I use it with a highland reflective foil mat underneath, that's all you need for a comfy nights sleep.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I haven't tested many, well literally never slept on any foam pad except the one I have, but I couldn't be happier with it, 320grams, good size and very cheap (15-20 euros).
          It's called Robens Zigzag.
          Though I'm sure you could find something a bit more comfortable if you're willing to spend, but for 15-20euros it's quite worth it, very very light aswell.

          https://i.imgur.com/nSt7S5g.png

          Closed cell EVA mats, thickness depends on where you want to sleep. I bought a 1m x 2m x 4mm mat online and fold it, if the ground is hard or cold. Usually there is no need if you have soft, unfrozen forest floor.
          There is a product called EXPED Doublemat Evazote. but you can buy a mat like that unbranded, and thus cheaper, elsewhere.
          Unfolded it has R1.1, folded it's 2.2, which is enough for all year except below freezing.

          Thanks anons, bubble wrap seems too good to be true but I have some so IU will try it out in the garden.
          i will also check out the Robens and the exped. I'm quite good with not needing excessive comfort, I occasionally sleep on the floor when the gf is in one of her fidgety sleep modes and I sleep better than in the bed, or at least I seem to feel better when I wake up, my back especially seems to love the hard floor.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >always searching for a way to make the gf drop

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I haven't tested many, well literally never slept on any foam pad except the one I have, but I couldn't be happier with it, 320grams, good size and very cheap (15-20 euros).
        It's called Robens Zigzag.
        Though I'm sure you could find something a bit more comfortable if you're willing to spend, but for 15-20euros it's quite worth it, very very light aswell.

      • 4 weeks ago
        /out/ie

        Closed cell EVA mats, thickness depends on where you want to sleep. I bought a 1m x 2m x 4mm mat online and fold it, if the ground is hard or cold. Usually there is no need if you have soft, unfrozen forest floor.
        There is a product called EXPED Doublemat Evazote. but you can buy a mat like that unbranded, and thus cheaper, elsewhere.
        Unfolded it has R1.1, folded it's 2.2, which is enough for all year except below freezing.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Wanna go on a countryside trip and visit some small islands. Seems like it might be surprisingly sunny the whole time, but still want to buy some proper waterproof bivy/sleeping bag or whatever. Any recommendation what to look for?
    Military bivys seem a bit too expensive, though.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone ever use a creature as a space heater?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ya, I like to use your mom

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do I get over my irrational fear of sleeping a night in the woods in a hammock/tent
    I keep feeling like I'm gonna get buttfucked by a cryptid

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      do you already go sleep in the woods? if not try that first. also tell yourself to man up. why would a monster come kill you?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >why would a monster come kill you?
        I don't know if you know this but that is the only thing they do. You think monsters are just prancing around at night, staring at the stars? There is literally only one thing they do every waking moment and that's look for things to fuck and kill, not necessarily in that order.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm scared of
      >a crazed hiker turned serial rapist-murderer who decided to rape and murder his first victim that day
      >people who might own the sliver of forest I'm camping in who will beat me up or call the cops
      >cops and other authority who will arrest me or worse, fine me for more shekels than I own (which is any amount)
      >being filmed in secret by cackling zoomers while I'm doing something cringey and going viral on youtube
      >being filmed in secret by cackling zoomers while I'm bleeding out from a self-inflicted hatchet wound and going viral on liveleak
      >boars
      >the devil and other supernatural creatures
      >any of this happening and me mom dying of heartbreak

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm gonna teach you an advanced technique of mine, ok?

        Use a decoy tent. Bring one larger and more obvious tent and something smaller and more concealable. Honestly, the best thing is to just get used to sleeping in trees if you can learn how to quickly and silently rig up some insect netting once you climb up. So here's what you do:
        >find campsite near good sleeping trees
        >set up decoy tent while it's still light
        >once it gets dark, act like you're getting into it
        >EXTREMELY QUIETLY sneak back out of it
        >climb your sleeping tree (bring your gun with you)
        >have a nice and safe rest
        >if any monsters or serial killers try to open your tent in the night, light them up with your trusty sidearm
        Obviously this works best with very low moonlight and won't help if someone/something decides to stalk you for a couple nights but it's certainly better than zipping yourself into a plastic coffin and waiting for something to come stomp you.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Holy fuck bro if you're that afraid of everything then you need to accept that going outside isn't for you.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is a bivy not good enough if the rain is too strong?

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    WHERE IS MY HAMMOCK REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
    The delivery plane must've crashed and the pilot used it as a parachute and now he's set up a base somewhere on a remote island with all the camping gear I ordered

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cant find another thread to post this in, but has anyone tried the ticket to the moon convertable bugnet? i can get it 50% off right now and it seems like a fairly well thought out design

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bro you can find inflatable pads for $20 on Amazon and they work fine, used one for years.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    First time I set her anywhere and she stays. Must be warm.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That's my sweetheart!
      How common is it to wake up to a snake? Not likely afaik

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >and I only just now realized why I never slept well while camping.
    Because you sleep on a mattress at home and have thus conditioned your body to unnatural sleeping postures?

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is this too bulky for a sleep system?
    I'm having several thoughts about going backpacking with this
    Handgun for scale

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Jesus what the fuck is that

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that's not compressed, you have to squeeze it under your knee and pull on the buckles there

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It is compressed, it doesn't compress the sleeping pad well, which is 25in wide

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use a usgi MSS. I put a closed cell foam on the ground and then an insulated inflatable inside the bivy. Coldest I've slept in it is -50c, at that point you will need to wear all your clothes inside and also have a fleece bag liner.

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