Rolling Block

Is it the 19th Century Kalashnikov?
>cheap
>reliable
>soldier-proof
>sold en-masse to every damn thirdie nation
>can be used even by illiterate teen recruits
>continues to be used even after newer, better rifles are available

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >efficient
    >elegant
    >strong
    Rolling blocks are great. Comparing them to an AK is a low blow but I see your point.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, a bit of a labored comparison on my part, but mostly because everything was better made back then.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There's something really charming about the last rollers. The barrel and forend looking like it belongs on a bolt action repeater, but the action and buttstock looking like something from the Civil War.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think the action wouldn't look out of place on a modern hunting rifle. I'm surprised they don't still make them, I think it could compete with the Ruger 1

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it can't handle the bolt forces that the No. 1 can.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There were 7mm rollers. It can handle modern ammo.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              7mm Mauser back in the day propelled a 170gr bullet to 2300fps. that's not even .308 performance. the rolling block action just isn't that strong because it exerts radial loads onto axial supports. you aren't going to stuff 300WM into it, unlike a no. 1. if you rereleased it, it'd probably cost 3500 bucks apiece and not sell because you can already get No. 1s in pretty much every caliber known to man and some only known to monkeys.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Yeah, but not .458 Win Mag.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            7mm Mauser back in the day propelled a 170gr bullet to 2300fps. that's not even .308 performance. the rolling block action just isn't that strong because it exerts radial loads onto axial supports. you aren't going to stuff 300WM into it, unlike a no. 1. if you rereleased it, it'd probably cost 3500 bucks apiece and not sell because you can already get No. 1s in pretty much every caliber known to man and some only known to monkeys.

            You forgot simple. It's damned near as easy to disassemble as a caplock. I'm convinced that ease of disassembly was perhaps the most important feature of a weapon in the black powder era.
            >except for pistols
            >just throw them in the pot of boiling water for a few minutes and call it good
            >i unironically clean my bp revolvers like this today

            Pedersoli is still making them, but they'll never compete with the Ruger in the smokeless era.

            [...]
            It was extremely fricking marginal for 7mm back in the day, and 7mm back in the day wasn't what it is today. The Achilles heel of the rolling block design was that it was basically perfect when it was introduced. The action was stronger than it needed to be for BP, yet wasn't really strong enough for smokeless, and improvements in materials weren't going to make it much stronger. It was, and is, an evolutionary dead end.

            That having been said, there's something about dropping the hammer on a weapon that will kill you if it goes off without the hammer dropping first that makes me love it. It's completely safe unless you pull the trigger, and then it becomes completely safe. (Unless a pin and/or the receiver sidewalls fail, and then you die.) The elegance and simplicity of the design is absolutely genius, and it was plenty strong enough for the era. Unfortunately, it wasn't strong enough for what followed.

            Falling blocks get the adoration today because they've withstood the test of time, but for a fleet weapon of the latter half of the 19th century, the rolling block made more sense. That's exactly the reason it was as popular as it was at the time. It wasn't the Kalashnikov of the 19th century, but rather the Glock.

            Up the size of the block and hammer pins and make it out of modern steel

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              that's not how it works. there is a fixed relation between the sizes of the hammer and breech block proportions because the hammer has to pass through the breech. as the breech block gets bigger you have a longer thin portion of that piece and a longer lever arm for the forces to act on the center pin. if you are going to totally redesign it, then why bother? just make it in low bolt-force calibers and keep it the same. it already has practically no chance at commercial success, no point in screwing it up too.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I didn't say make the breech block bigger, I said make the pins bigger. There's plenty room for it. Besides, it was made in 8mm Lebel, so I'm sure it could handle at least 308 as is.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This. Using the hammer to buttress the breachblock is like using a doorstop vs a bar.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You forgot simple. It's damned near as easy to disassemble as a caplock. I'm convinced that ease of disassembly was perhaps the most important feature of a weapon in the black powder era.
          >except for pistols
          >just throw them in the pot of boiling water for a few minutes and call it good
          >i unironically clean my bp revolvers like this today

          Pedersoli is still making them, but they'll never compete with the Ruger in the smokeless era.

          There were 7mm rollers. It can handle modern ammo.

          It was extremely fricking marginal for 7mm back in the day, and 7mm back in the day wasn't what it is today. The Achilles heel of the rolling block design was that it was basically perfect when it was introduced. The action was stronger than it needed to be for BP, yet wasn't really strong enough for smokeless, and improvements in materials weren't going to make it much stronger. It was, and is, an evolutionary dead end.

          That having been said, there's something about dropping the hammer on a weapon that will kill you if it goes off without the hammer dropping first that makes me love it. It's completely safe unless you pull the trigger, and then it becomes completely safe. (Unless a pin and/or the receiver sidewalls fail, and then you die.) The elegance and simplicity of the design is absolutely genius, and it was plenty strong enough for the era. Unfortunately, it wasn't strong enough for what followed.

          Falling blocks get the adoration today because they've withstood the test of time, but for a fleet weapon of the latter half of the 19th century, the rolling block made more sense. That's exactly the reason it was as popular as it was at the time. It wasn't the Kalashnikov of the 19th century, but rather the Glock.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >efficient
        >elegant
        >strong
        Rolling blocks are great. Comparing them to an AK is a low blow but I see your point.

        https://i.imgur.com/zTZdDXV.jpeg

        The rolling block rifle is so fricking cool. I love me some single shot rifles.

        >only one shot
        What's the appeal?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >he doesn't know

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          full moron loads

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Colonial/Imperial wars of the 19th Century, the simplicity of the designs contrasting with the massively enhanced firepower compared with muskets, the elegance of the rifles, the beautiful cloud of blackpowder smoke.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          you get to enjoy each shot more.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You only get one shot

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          one opportunity

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous
        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Working the action is the coolest part of shooting a gun and with a single shot you get to do it every time you shoot.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >What's the appeal?
          to lose yourself in the music.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >>only one shot
          >What's the appeal?
          There isn't one.
          Don't let anyone tell you different.
          20 round mag should be the legal bare minimum for any firearm.
          If you ever even see a single shot gun just run away from it. The people who handle them are weirdos.
          Stay far, far away

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In terms of proliferation and relative simplicity, yes. In terms of quality, they were closer to being the AUG or SIG 550 of their day.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Fair.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If the US hadn't been moronic, they'd have adopted these instead of the Trapdoor. By 1870, they knew that converting muskets was never going to work out.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hell, they could've reused the old musket barrels at least.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They did at first with the 1865 model, but the original .58-60 rimfire cartridge sucked and they moved to .50-70 centerfire instead once they adopted the 1866. The 1866 required relining the .58 caliber musket barrels to .50, but the lining would sometimes separate from the barrel so that didn't work either. The 1868 fixed that problem by having newly made barrels. That worked of course, but the original idea of converting old muskets died with the new model's introduction.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'd have just switched to the Peabody at that point.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      As someone who ones a Model 1871 Remington Rolling Block, it definitely would have been a better choice mechanically, less the hammer safety. Training wise, would have been a bit of a hurdle but nothing that couldn't be overcome. But it seems that Ordnance had their heart set on the Trapdoor action which is still a fine rifle.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is there an ejector on these or does the spent catridge just fall off the extractor?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          In the older models opening the block pushed an extractor, and I suppose that a more foreceful opening would properly eject. Late models (smokeless era) had a spring-loaded ejector that properly kicked out cases.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Neat.
            Thanks anon.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Own a pair of 7mm ones myself, one considered the M1902 pattern and the other considered the M1910 pattern by collectors.

        Only downside is that the chambers are stupid long because reasons so I have to handload softer rounds to shoot them, but they're still a blast to shoot!

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nice, mine is my oldest rifle at 152 years old but I found brass for it and casted some bullets and once I figure out a load for it, it'll probably be a decent shooter. Got some weird looks for bringing it out last time as it stands out on a firing line that is nothing but ARs and durr guns.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      We didn't adopt the trapdoor because it was good. We adopted it because it was cheap.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just want a rolling block in .308 so bad.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    how hard is it to get into rolling blocks? Are they particularly expensive compared to other rifles or is it just the rarer variants chambered in non BP cartrdiges?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not too hard. 43 Spanish can be made with .348, and 7mm rollers are pretty common.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The rolling block rifle is so fricking cool. I love me some single shot rifles.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Their big drawback as a military weapon is that they are fully wienered and loaded at the end of the loading procedure, the only way to carry it somewhat safe was to put it manually on half wiener, needless to say that accidents where frequent.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You know what? Frick you.
    >turns your rolling block into a pump action

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is that a bad thing?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Maybe?

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm gonna have to find the video of it, but my buddy had a really old rolling block buffalo gun, then he loaded it with smokeless powder instead of black powder. The recoil was insane, and it crumpled the target plate. My ears were ringing even with doubled up earpro. Thinking back I guess I should just be glad it didn't blow up.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why has no one made a rolling block in 5.56? It could be a cute little youth/varmint rifle.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *