reloading

pressing some 200 gr 10 mm right now. feels good man.

N340 6.5 gr
assorted Winchester/RP brass.
range fodder.

what are you guys loading?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For those reloading for revolvers. Highly advise having a cannelure tool on hand. You can then be able to crimp a heavy bullet as far out as your cylinder will accomodate, opens up more performance.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Or you could just use a Lee collet crimp like a normal person.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I like ruining brass faster
        Those dimples are hideous too.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          What the hell are you on about?
          Seriously, you're going to kick yourself when you realise that nobody else is arsing around with a jerry rigged blunt pipe cutter and uses a $15 die instead.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Your confused. The crimp tool he’s talking about puts a crimp behind the bullet so that it won’t slip backwards down the case.. if you crimp a revolver round on a conalure this isn’t a huge problem, but sometimes they don’t have the conalure in the right place.. the taper crimp will help keep it from slipping forward, but putting the crimp behind the bullet as well helps seat it.. I’ve got some 45 Lc brass that came with it.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The tool I'm talking about will roll a new cannelure on the bullet.
          Lee factory crimp dies are great at crushing the case mouth into the bullet, but if you'd like to get more than a few loads with a piece of brass then you don't use it like the other homosexual is suggesting.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I want to live on the planet where you get two dozen firings out of Bubba's Pissin' Hot LC and a heavy roll crimp doesn't literally bend the case mouth inwards.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    thinking of getting into reloading
    any tips for where to start?
    I mostly shoot 9mm and 5.56 but I have guns in .303 british, 30-40 krag, and 6.5 creedmoore that I dont shoot much because availability and expense. I also am planning an AR10 build that would be worth reloading.
    Is there a good system that will get you started but you can build off of? or is it buy once cry once?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you don't mind a workout you can get a lee hand press to get started. it's cheap, gets the job done and good for learning the quirks of reloading because it's very hands-on.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        but once I get into reloading I wouldnt use it anymore right? I'm fine with setting up a dedicated bench, I want equip that will grow with me

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          can't really grow a press, you can only move the dies to a different press. the great divide is between single stage and multi-stage presses. the latter are more expensive and laborious to set up than the former, but once that's done you can crank out rounds much faster.
          if you want to start reloading you should decide between something cheap to get to know things, and maybe decide it's not for you, or get the single stage you want to keep forever. even if you want to invest a lot into reloading and eventually get a multi-stage press, you'll always get use out of a single stage.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            been doing some readying, seems like the big jump is to a progressive press
            for starting out, is there much of an advantage in a turret press over a single die press?
            are tumblers a requirement?

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              the benefits of a turret press over a single stage are negligible.
              a progressive press only makes sense if you want to load a lot of rounds in few calibers. switching between calibers is quite a chore.
              you'll have to clean used brass some way. if you neglect cleaning the brass you'll eventually get a stuck case and you don't want that, trust me. a tumbler is a handy and cheap way to get brass clean enough. you can also wash it by hand if you don't want to tumble it, or get something more fancy.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This confirms a lot of the assumptions I had while reading, Thank you
                I will probably get the lee challenger kit and a tumbler when I'm ready to pull the trigger

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Just get the hand press.
                You will always find a need for it. Good to prep brass while watching TV or whatever.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I've literally never cleaned any brass and have never had any problems. I just use case lube and it's fine.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >are tumblers a requirement?
              A bowl with some dish soap and citric acid is all you need. Case exteriors get clean, bright, and shiny without much work. Interiors will still have powder residue but it's not a big deal.

              https://i.imgur.com/wyg1lDt.jpeg

              That's only if you consider your time free.

              Here in Finland quality 7.62x54R costs almost 2€/piece and loading costs about 85c/piece so it makes economical sense to load your own ammo.

              >pic related, loaded 300 rounds yesterday

              >He's not reloading while on the clock at a WFH job
              >He doesn't enjoy the meditation of doing the same steps hundreds of times
              >He doesn't enjoy the pride that comes with precision manufacturing at home to a higher standard than commercial manufacturers
              Ngmi

              making 10mm mag brass out of starline's blank 6.8 rifle brass. Kinda fun. Started with chopping it down using a Rigid pipe cutter, using a Lee hand/ball cutter with 10mm mag gauge, the some special expander dies from Redding, and a quick sizing with a standard sizing die. Getting my timing down with each iteration. Def a pain in the ass, but kind of rewarding. I do have a handgun case that takes a rifle primer which is a little derp, so not sure if this effort is going to yield a weird final round.

              Is there any reaming required? I know you have to do it for .308 -> 45acp

              Really? I thought they didn't even have the same seating depth... this is a revelation: thank-you!

              That's large primers that have different heights
              Small pistol magnum and small rifle are sometimes the exact same primers depending on the manufacturer

              I just like hornadys locking rings…

              Hornady lock rings are annoying because they change their height as you tighten them, i.e. if you have an unlocked die snugged up and tighten the lock ring it will lock itself into the press. With RCBS lock rings you can lock them while snugged up and you can still remove the die easily.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You’ll find a use for it.. at the very least you can keep a universal decapping die in it and immediately fix your priming screw ups without having to wait to the end, switch dies, decap, switch dies again and load…

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I started this year and ended up going with a Lee Turret press. I started w/45acp because it is very easy and I own a few 1911's. I've loaded about 4k so far and don't have any major complaints about this press or Lee dies.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I don't get turret presses. it's equivalent to a single stage with quick change bushings. just use a single stage.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      hand presses suck don't listen to those guys. invest smart, get a good rcbs or lee multi stage single stroke press and related dies. progressives are too expensive to get into cheaply.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      .303 and 30-40 are definitely worth reloading from a time vs money viewpoint.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    hopefully fireforming a bunch of grendel brass this weekend and spinning up some more .30-06 garand. there's a pile of ss109 i need to load but i'm dragging my feet on the brass prep.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    speaking of reloading 10 mm, I absolutely recommend Hornady seating dies because the bullet alignment sleave works perfectly every time. the case mouth barely needs any opening and the bullets don't need careful placing.
    I ike to finish it off with a Lee factory crimp die just in case I have any oversized bullets.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      are dies interchangeable between brands?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I just like hornadys locking rings…

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I could tell that was N340 from the picture alone.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      N320, N330, N340 and N350 all look the same.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    After practicing on 38 special, 357, and 45LC. After ordering rounds, hunting out the small rifle magnum primers, and finally today getting lucky and finding 3 pounds of h110 locally along with a pound of enforcer… it’s finally time to start reloading some 454 casull rounds..

    Gonna trim the brass, and go from there.. loading 40 rounds total. 20 each of h110 and enforcer at 5 different powder levels to test out.. I keep debating loading more of each level but I’m not sure I wanna test fire my way through 60 rounds.. plan is to load tonight, then test shoot tomorrow. Have a Ruger Alaskan to run them through. Love it when a plan comes together.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've got some 38 special to do then I'm going to try 45 supers. I shelled out the cash for some new powders and got a small pack of 250g .452 blue bullets for it and if all goes well I'll buy more unless I can find a heavier projectile that's not bare lead

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If your feeling spendy hornady has a 300 grain xtp mag bullet. Its meant for 454 but its not like going slower will hurt it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I'm just worried about seating depth and powder compression with some of those 300s. I saw load data for some 275g but I'd have to cast and coat them and I'm not that serious about them

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got into reloading in August and went super into it I love it. On top of what I already stockpiled I lucked out on an estate sale and got an assortment of 9000 primers for only 300 lol in boxes that looked liked they were 80s-90s era. I don't mind old stuff though I know it shoots fine.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I also lucked out on an estate sale.. spent about 1k through the estate, and another 1k on powder, dies, reamers, cases trays fancy big bullets, powder and primers… but I’ve also loaded just shy of 3500 rounds of 38 special, 357 and 45lc… cranked out 4 different types of 45 acp to test and have enough components to load somewhere around 1400 rounds of that with what I have. Also tonight I crank out my first 454 rounds for testing and I’ve got enough components to make about 400…. Lastly I’ll be able to make about 100 500 magnum rounds without buying more bullets and 50 500 bushwacker rounds… Got powder for a lot more.. all in I’ll be able to load well over a years worth of shooting. And load about twice what I’d get if I paid for it outright, plus being able to make some specialty stuff like extra light 500 magnum for people who want to shoot the 500 but you want to be sure they aren’t going to smack themselves in the face…. Next step is a chronograph and then pushing some loads… plus I need to buy a 44 mag since I have 2k hardcasts for 44 mag and 2 die sets… also got 2 bullet lubrisizers… and with the calibers I have I think it makes a lot of sense to look at casting and gas checks…

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        my estate sale also include a giant bin of imr 4895 surplus powder but knowing how old that shit was and the details about powder decomposition and the military's standards I didn't want to risk it.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          when powder decomposes it starts to stink. if it smells good it's at least not dangerous. when it gives off orange fumes get rid of it asap.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The orange stuff oxidization from metal containers/lids.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              orange fumes = nitrous oxides = decomposing nitrocellulose

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Define "metal" last I checked the only powder touches when loaded is metal.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I did get some sketchy old powder but so far it’s shot fine.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Todays rounds for testing..
    152 rounds of 45 acp in 4 different bullet types, xtp hollow point 185 gn , semi wadcutter 200 go, 200 gn copper plated round nose, 230 gn cast round nose. Loaded max to min charge in .2 grain intervals..

    Then 44 rounds of 454 casull, 20 in h110, 24 loaded with enforcer…. 240 gn xtp mag bullets in both.

    Today is going to be a good day.

    Next week it’s time to bulk load whatever works best today.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And the verdict is the enforcer loaded 454 rounds are far more accurate than the h110, but the h110 has the edge for turning money into loud explosions, which since about 30% of having this for fun is “try this, brace for recoil” means I’ll be loading at least 150 of both…

      Out of all the 45 acp I only had one fail to chamber well and it was a semi wadcutter.. the rest cycled well, the xtp rounds were by far the most accurate.. which is unfortunate since those are pricey… the LRN cast bullets were a surprise second, but those were on unique and it’s really Smokey in that… so maybe I’ll try them on something else… going to bulk load the round nose 200 grain rounds for plinking.. somehow managed to collect all but 12 pieces of my 45 acp brass.

      Also man… if you want to meet people and get asked questions shoot through 44 rounds of loud as hell 454 at an indoor range with a snubnose while they’re running a shooting skills class in the neighboring range… lol it was a great time. Did have one of the h110 rounds walk forward, but on close inspection the case is bulged a little and I don’t think it got fully crimped.. luckily it didn’t lock up the cylinder..

      In general with 454 I’m getting 4 inch groups from my Alaskan at 10 yards.. which feels like crap, but is pretty good considering the recoil. Looking foreward to having a bunch of the same loaded ammo to work on it with rather than tons of different types of 20 round boxes…

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I promise you, nothing is influencing your pistol round accuracy besides you. Just get a velocity target and pursue that. Foolish going off accuracy for a pistol ffs.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          While I’m not hunting for nodes or anything like that, I can assure you from recent personal experience that the difference in recoil from light loaded 454 up to hot loaded 454 is worth experimenting with.

          On a side note… does anyone else sit there half drunk singing “this is the way we trim the brass, trim the brass, trim the brass. This is the way we trim the brass to prep it for reloading”. While they size cases? Or is it just me…

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >trimming your cases in a plastic tub to avoid getting brass shavings everywhere
            Downright autistic/OCD behavior.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Just don’t want brass shavings in the carpet man. Don’t need the kids getting poked, and don’t want to vacuum the carpet at 0 dark thirty at night while the kids are sleeping…. Also the plastic bin makes it easy to bring all that stuff in and out at once.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Don't let your kids in the reloading room.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The reloading presses are in the garage, the tray lets me bring brass to trim in so I my wife and I can watch tv in the living room after the kids have gone to bed.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >trimming straight wall brass
            why do you do this to yourself

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              It’s 454 casull and I want the crimps to be consistent since it’s pushing a 240 grain xtp bullet out at about 1950 ish fps… and I need consistent case lengths for that…. Also it’s only 400 cases… so it’s not like I’m loading thousands of rounds of 9mm..

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >crimping
                christ, save us

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I NEED BOOZE TO FEEL GOOD ABOUT MYSELF
            Stop.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    More testing with Pindad Exakt 5 centish small pistol primers, they were going off 100% now that I seat them more uniform to the case mouth, they must be a bit shorter than US brand primers.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >reloading saves mone--
    Stop lying /k/, reloading is the biggest waste of money i've ever got into

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe don’t reload with the powder all the cowboy action folk lust after.. fwiw I track my costs vs what I’ve saved if I were to theoretically buy all the ammo I’ve loaded.. Im at just under 3500 rounds loaded, spent 2193$ current cost to buy new is 1852$.. tonight im loading 150 454 casull rounds that average 2$ a round to buy locally, and pretty close to that if I buy online in bulk.. tomorrow I plan to load another 200 which should push me well over the edge for cost vs expenses.. and I’ve got plenty of components to load more. Depends on what your loading.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's only if you consider your time free.

        Here in Finland quality 7.62x54R costs almost 2€/piece and loading costs about 85c/piece so it makes economical sense to load your own ammo.

        >pic related, loaded 300 rounds yesterday

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Were sitting around on 4 Chan…. All of us have the kind of time that isn’t money…. But that aside most of the big bore calibers make sense to reload. The only round I’m reloading that I struggle with in terms of “is it worth it” is 45 acp.. originally I wasn’t gonna do it, but I had about 3k pieces of brass, and ended up with about 2k worth of bullets and have enough primers that I’m not worried about using them and decided I might as well get the die set and load it…
          >loaded 191 rounds of 454 casull… and ran out of enforcer powder, loading another 150 with h110 tomorrow.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >That's only if you consider your time free.
          if you don't enjoy the act of making your own stuff that's a reflection of you. even if you factor that in, though, it's extremely worthwhile.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I could have been hunting roe deer buck on the spring season instead but needed ammo for training next week, so I had to stay home and reload.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Brain dead take. Either buy new or reload ahead of time for your "training" which for you is I assume blasting at trash from 10 yards away with your psa15

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >he says, whining on PrepHole about a lack of time
              yeah, your problem isn't reloading, it's being bad at time management.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you're reloading wildcats such as 7mm STW (which isn't that much of a wildcat) you do save money. Reloading common calibers is less about savings and .ore about tailoring the ammo to your firearm IMO.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There's a big fat gap between wildcats and bulk range ammo. Assume you're getting 9mm, .223, etc at cost and can handload at around the same price. Now compare similarly sized less common but still entirely standard rounds and you'll notice the cost differential has frick all to do with materials and labour.
        To take a couple e.g. off the top of my head, 357 SIG and .45 super will cost you a couple of grains of powder more than 9mm and ACP to load, but you're paying at least twice as much from the factory.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Will probably do some reloading in the future, but at the moment only shooting 7.62x54R and there’s plenty of good priced ammo still around.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    220gr @ 1200 is the master load

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just deprimed all my 5.56, 300BLK, .45 and 9mm brass. I've got the 9mm in the FART now.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bum

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just bought a press second-hand and am looking for some dies.
    Should I get some new regular Hornady dies(matching press) or should I search for some carbide rifle dies?
    Loading for 5.56 and not sure if I can get away with no case lube or if it's an inevitability and get regular steel dies.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No experience with rifle dies, and I’m new to reloading, but so far I prefer the hornady to the lee and RCBS dies… but a lot of that is the hornady lock rings are a lot nicer than the other options…

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Just get the Lee 4 die set and some lanolin, it works fine.

      https://i.imgur.com/fnZ9Ite.jpeg

      Your confused. The crimp tool he’s talking about puts a crimp behind the bullet so that it won’t slip backwards down the case.. if you crimp a revolver round on a conalure this isn’t a huge problem, but sometimes they don’t have the conalure in the right place.. the taper crimp will help keep it from slipping forward, but putting the crimp behind the bullet as well helps seat it.. I’ve got some 45 Lc brass that came with it.

      Yes we've established he's an idiot. I know what he was talking about but I have no idea why, that's not a collet die and it's only marginally less moronic than manually rolling a cannelure.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Got any opinions on using this for 454 vs the Lee 45 lc carbide roll crimp?
        https://www.precisionreloading.com/cart.php#!l=RE&i=86191
        Had 2 454 rounds creep forward under max loads.. shooting them out of a snubnosed SRH.. doubt it’s necessary for much else, but 454’s a lot of energy and I’d like to get it perfect.. especially since I’m currently loading 240 grain xtp bullets and the recoil isn’t gonna get any better with gas checked hardcast..

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you've got a cannelure, make use of it. Don't use an FCD if you're using oversized lead bullets either. Aside from that it gets a pretty good grip, but there's just not as much material on the front side.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I’ve been crimping pretty hard in the cannalure on the xtp mag bullets I’ve got, both bullets that jumped crimp were the last shots out of 6 on max powder loads. 38.2 grains of h110 in one case, and 33.5 grains of enforcer…

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Well, Midway says it'll cost you all of $23 to find out. Hell, Amazon will take a return.
              What I'd do is load a couple of dummies, one FCD one roll, and then fire single non-pissin' shots until you see eruption.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Crimp jump is inevitable with heavy loads no matter how you crimp them.
              Leave yourself about .020" of tolerance below your cylinder length and you can generally get through a cylinder full without being tied up.
              Just don't leave a cartridge of that type in for multiple cylinder's worth.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      carbide dies are great for straight-walled cases. for necked cases just use case lube. it takes seconds to apply and makes sizing so much easier. you don't need special case lube lanolin or a good grease will do.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    making 10mm mag brass out of starline's blank 6.8 rifle brass. Kinda fun. Started with chopping it down using a Rigid pipe cutter, using a Lee hand/ball cutter with 10mm mag gauge, the some special expander dies from Redding, and a quick sizing with a standard sizing die. Getting my timing down with each iteration. Def a pain in the ass, but kind of rewarding. I do have a handgun case that takes a rifle primer which is a little derp, so not sure if this effort is going to yield a weird final round.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      SPP and SRP are interchangeable, assuming you're keeping it to <40k and you haven't been fricking with your hammer spring.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Really? I thought they didn't even have the same seating depth... this is a revelation: thank-you!

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ready to go!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      too much lube, cool it

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are file-type trim dies worth it, or should I get a normal case trimmer setup?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Curious about this myself… I have a trimmer that works well for everything else but doesn’t fit 500 mag…

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's more of a case forming thing. The kind of tool you use when you have no other choice.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just got my 6 stage progressive press set up. Its way more work to set up than any other press but its worth it if you only shoot 1 caliber with a handful of loads.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Man the biggest thing other than price keeping from using a progressive is the worry I’ll frick up a couple hundred rounds before I realize somethings going wrong..

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        that's why you use a powder checker. also occasionally inspect what you're making.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yep that's what puts me off. If I want a case of bog standard plinking ammo I can just buy that at a reasonable cost. What I generally want for the weekend is 6 assorted boxes that would cost me the same as the case to buy.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Its worth it if you shoot a lot of overpriced stuff like .38, .44 etc. People trying to reload 9mm and other dirt cheap ammo are looking for anything but a better paying job.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I reload 9mm because cranking them out of the 650 takes very little time and my loads are a blast.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you just love to reload I get it, but Ive had these conversations with people so many times that realize they have to drop 500+ for a setup that can crank out bullets and only saves them 5 cpr max. Id probably do a batch of 1-2k 9mm defensive rounds if I felt like it honestly because thats where the money savings ar.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              nobody needs 2000 defensive rounds though. I recouped the costs of my press on other calibers. cranking out pissin hot 9mm for marginally less than the cheapest factory ammo is just a bonus.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                100-200 for carry and hd mags in rotation and the rest for training.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Thing is for training you don't need the fancy JHPs or solids that are 2/3 the cost of the round, you just need a stout load that shoots to same POI.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Fair, but when reloading all the good prices are from buying in bulk. If I'm getting anything more than just a box of XTP bullets I'm probably buying by the case.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah but it's not like they go off, they can sit on the shelf for a decade. You don't have to actually shoot them until they start getting grotty from carry.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                This is all in context to using a progressive press. My point was I wouldn't reload 9mm unless I was reloading "hyper" ammo in bulk, its just not worth the hassle of going through 6 stages and calibrating them just for 100 rounds, if I was only doing a 100 rounds or so I have a hand press.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I get what you're saying. Really progressives only make sense for very high volume shooters, or a club or syndicate. Although in the US I bet there are massive liability/moron issues there.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                People with progressives are either autistic engineers who want to run a production line in their home, comp shooters and serial magdumpers who need a cheaper fix for their needs and people who shoot only 1 or 2 calibers of obscure round but a lot of it, or revolvergays who are stuck in 50+ cpr hell for even basic light ammo.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hypothetical question-
    If I have the opportunity to buy 1 of 3 rifles, and 2 are in a wildcat caliber that’s all but impossible to find, and I know little to nothing about reloading (only thing I know is how to pop out an old primer and pop in a new one), and the other rifle is in a caliber that’s readily available; then should I just go for the ladder, or is reloading actually worth it at that point?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do you feel like you’d be ok spending the time and money to reload for 2 wildcat rounds? There’s some guys on here who would say yes, plenty who would say no… it’s going to be the most expensive way to jump into reloading because you’ll need basically all the gear, but if you think your likely to pick up other reloadable calibers down the line then that starts to be less of an issue….

      Anon.. it’s entirely possible to do, only you can answer the question of “is it worth it to me”

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That’s a really good way to put it honestly. I can say that sotting here on the toilet, I’m thinking to myself “yeah, I could do that.”
        But realistically speaking I know it’d be something I’d probably never really do.
        I will say one thing though. I do have pic related with no dyes or anything with it. That being said- idk how much more it’d cost to get started.
        But let’s say by some chance I didn’t get into it- my main focus is a little fantasy I’ve had for a while about taking spent brass for a bolt action, popping in a new primer with maybe I sprinkle of black powder with a wax projectile for backyard plinking fun. Idk if that would even be possible, but I’d like to do that at the very least. Really that’s actually my main goal.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You fatfingered your pic and ended up with anime gif instead of your pic related btw. I almost asked the calibers until I moron checked myself and realized you said "Hypothetical" lol.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Forgot pic. Sorry.
            Well I’m wanting to buy a throw around rifle to do said stuff with.

            All comes down to what the rifles are, what you want them for, and how much you want to shoot them. Can't really say much in a vacuum.
            >go for the ladder
            Ehhh.

            Read

            https://i.imgur.com/9PLKDmF.gif

            That’s a really good way to put it honestly. I can say that sotting here on the toilet, I’m thinking to myself “yeah, I could do that.”
            But realistically speaking I know it’d be something I’d probably never really do.
            I will say one thing though. I do have pic related with no dyes or anything with it. That being said- idk how much more it’d cost to get started.
            But let’s say by some chance I didn’t get into it- my main focus is a little fantasy I’ve had for a while about taking spent brass for a bolt action, popping in a new primer with maybe I sprinkle of black powder with a wax projectile for backyard plinking fun. Idk if that would even be possible, but I’d like to do that at the very least. Really that’s actually my main goal.

            Basically I wanna try making wax projectiles for plinking and leaping stuff, but also occasionally use live ammo. Was looking at a few beat up surplus guns.
            Heavily leaning towards a 6.5x52 Carcano just because you can still find brass and ammo.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              larping stuff* sorry.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Carcano with wax bullets
              My god, why did I never think of that? what distance can rifles be shot primer only with wax at reasonable accuracy? I have a Carcano sitting around with no brass and a priming press. Shit I have some surp guns that I could probably pick up random brass for and shoot wax out of too.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Haha it’s been an idea I’ve had for some time now. With ammo prices, that’s what I’d say keeps me from shooting more than I do. But with wax, you can target practice all you want in theory and what do primers and wax cost? Basically nothing, and you don’t have to worry about a press.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I’ll have to dig out the book but one of the older reloading manuals I have lists plastic target ammo that doesn’t get powder..

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I also have another thought: glue sticks. Maybe the really thin sticks cut like wadcutters. Not quite sure how close you'd get to the caliber sizebut packs of glue sticks are like $5 max. Shit, you could pour them in lead molds even...

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >lead molds
                Could do it with wax too

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I would NOT use glue sticks because they're formulated to melt easily and adhere to surfaces. tiny amounts of that will vaporize and gum up your gun.

                you can make reusable training bullets from polypropylene rods.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The gun's going to get dirty as frick anyway, it's always a cleaning after using primer loads.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                cleaning powder residue ≠ cleaning literal glue

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                If you're moronic enough to use them in a gas gun you may have problems over time. In a manual action you don't notice any difference, a couple of jag passes and it's all gone whatever it is.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Super easy to peel it off anything with isopropyl alcohol; there's an old video where Peter Sripol shows off how well that shit comes off with just one drop in a FliteTest video. But true; maybe use high heat sticks if anything instead of shitty low heat. Also TY about the polypropylene rods idea; I swear to god I have a bucket of plastic rods somewhere unironically because it was free and I went "I'll need that somehow eventually" lol.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Yeah I did read it my dude

              And yeah, wax bullets work fine on just the primer. Depending on the currently non-existent details, it may be worth modifying a few cases to take shotshell primers.

              You can find or form brass for damn near anything ever made with minimal effort and expense, with a few exceptions where minimal turns into significant. If you're looking at junky surplus there won't be any exceptions in there.
              Wax works, hot glue works, plastic works. Tube caps/thread protectors are good. Use brass fired in your gun's chamber because obturation is not going to be happening. This is common stuff so you'll find plenty of ideas if you look around a bit. Accuracy is going to be minute of tin can at ranges somewhere between garage and garden.

              >lead molds
              Could do it with wax too

              Waste of time with wax, just press the case mouth into a sheet.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Accuracy is going to be minute of tin can at ranges somewhere between garage and garden.
                When you say that, about what distances are we talkin with wax and primer?
                What about wax, primer and a pinch of trail boss?
                Speaking of reloading actually- let’s say someone doesn’t have reloading equipment and they just wanted to measure out a .38 special shell full of say trail boss, and pop in a lead ball.
                How practical is that?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >let’s say someone doesn’t have reloading equipment and they just wanted to measure out a .38 special shell full of say trail boss, and pop in a lead ball. How practical is that?
                would probably work. i.e. bullet would fly out the front and cartridge won't blow up in your face.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Sweet. When it comes to trail boss, what’s that all about? I heard it’s basically the closest thing to BP in smokeless form but obviously not the same.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                it's an extremely low density, very fast powder

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I doubt it's anything like BP. I tried to mimic a BP load for my 45-70-405, but the max velocity of Trail Boss is around 700 fps compared to black powder at 1250 fps. It seems to be a cartridge for gallery shooting as the slower bullet means less recoil so faster shooting with accuracy as is common in SASS.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                So correct me if I’m wrong- but you know how you basically can’t screw up a black powder charge? Is trail boss the same, or is that like smokeless where you’ve gotta be extremely precise?
                I love BP cause it’s safe and fun, but man do I HATE cleaning it.
                >MiG

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                trail boss is just a very low density powder. this means you'll usually still get a light load even when the case is full, thus making it (usually) impossible to create an unsafe load - unless you grind up the powder or compress it like a psychopath.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                That sounds like a lot of fun then. I know nothing when it comes to loading smokeless. Only black powder. And quite frankly I’m afraid to mess with loading smokeless. What’d be the safest way to do that if I wanted to try popping in a new primer and pressing in a lead ball?
                I don’t know anything about case trimming or any of that stuff.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                trimming is usually only necessary for bottle necked rifle cases. there is no trimming involved with straight walled revolver cartridges.

                a safe way to load .38 special with lead balls and trail boss would be the following:

                1. get load data. uncharted territory is not your friend. some type of official data by powder or bullet manufacturers would be nice, but if you gather some concording user reports that's fine, too. if it's a powerful load you should "work your way up" to
                2. measure the weight of the powder load. you only need to do this once, because once you have a measured load you can see how much volume this requires and then work with the volumetric load. you can trim down some cartridge case to the size that holds the charge you need. volumetric loading is surprisingly accurate.

                once you have established how much powder goes into the case under the specific bullet you want to load, there really isn't much you can do wrong unless you really want it.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                45-70 is a honking great big case and as such it's very forgiving unless you're deliberately loading it nuclear. If you want trapdoor performance, volumetric will be fine. A .44 mag case is going to put you in the ballpark of being able to use most common 223/308 powders for that with a fat margin of error, although what you ought to do is work up your load and then cut off a 45-70 case as your "official" measure.

                >I NEED BOOZE TO FEEL GOOD ABOUT MYSELF
                Stop.

                You're wrong, people drink to better tolerate you. You should be thanking them, really.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Compressing trailboss, even in its normal state, will spike pressures substantially.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              if you're just getting 1 gun get one with attainable ammo
              even if you want to reload you are going to need brass for it, get something you can buy ammo for and keep the spent casings that you can reload as popgun ammo

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      All comes down to what the rifles are, what you want them for, and how much you want to shoot them. Can't really say much in a vacuum.
      >go for the ladder
      Ehhh.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And yeah, wax bullets work fine on just the primer. Depending on the currently non-existent details, it may be worth modifying a few cases to take shotshell primers.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Accurate 4064 pushing a 150, 155, or 172 gr projectile out of a M1. Trying different loads starting at 46gr with a Fed 210 primer.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    What’s a remanufactured bullet? As long as something shoots, I’m fine with it.

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