Realistically, what stops manufacturers from producing optics where you could have multiple presets of reticles for multiple distances therefore elimi...

Realistically, what stops manufacturers from producing optics where you could have multiple presets of reticles for multiple distances therefore eliminating the need for different zeros and holdovers ?

I'm aware of the Romeo 9T but that's limited to two zeros only and cost 2K and the Alpha Tarac is just a prism that shift your vision through it and that shit takes free real estate on rails on top of being $600.

The technology isn't there yet ?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >what stops manufacturers from producing optics where you could have multiple presets of reticles for multiple distances therefore eliminating the need for different zeros and holdovers
    Price and complexity of manufacture for a feature that not many people outside of casual shooters would want.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >what are holdover reticles?
    OP is a cumgargling nogunz

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He's talking about something else you moron

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Fricking nobody uses the EXPS3-4 reticle.
      If you tried it IRL you'd know why.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I mean, it'd be relatively simple to have an arrangement where a laser sets the range you're aiming at. A reader in the magazine well detects the ammo you're using, the load, weight and so on and calculates the mathematical trajectory the bullet will travel and then adjusts the sight accordingly to ensure it's always zeroed automatically and at any range.

    But, gun owners are afraid of electricity for some reason, so it won't happen.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      is it 2003?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I-Is that an e-e-e-lectronic s-safety!?
        >In March 2014, the California-based Oak Tree Gun Club was criticized for selling the iP1 at its shop, with lobbyists citing the New Jersey law to argue that its owners were acting against U.S. citizens' Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms. Despite evidence to the contrary, the club denied that it had offered the gun.
        >Similar threats, including death threats, were received in May 2014 by an owner of Engage Armaments in Maryland.
        >He also stopped selling the gun, arguing that the pro-gun lobby groups' actions were hypocritical, as they "are not supposed to say a gun should be prohibited. Then you are being no different from the anti-gun people who say an AR-15 should be prohibited."

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Now add the part where nobody asked for the gun to be prohibited, just not commercialized to avoid a prohibition of guns, and how then the dude went on a drunken livestream on YouTube to tell the people who were directing death threats at him that they should instead kill government officials, getting his channel taken down in the process.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      do it then.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It sort of already exists in the Burris Eliminator.
        You enter information via a connected phone app, the various sensors and Range finder built into scope, adjusts aim point automatically.

        It's not quite at the stage of just slapping an optic on a gun and then it just magically works. But that can't really happen until the gun itself has the means to relay information to any connected devices.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >A reader in the magazine well detects the ammo you're using, the load, weight and so on
      How do you expect a "reader" to determine what the BC of the bullets are and what kind of powder in is the cases to make that calculation?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Engravings on the casing of the bullet itself.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Congratulations. You just made cheap FMJ training ammo cost five dollars a round. And also fundamentally killed the handloading industry

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I never said it would be cheap or practical in all situations.

            But it would be cool.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            YOU ARE SUCH A gay.
            You are one of those homosexuals who list every reason why something can’t happen. b***h laser engrave a QR code on the bullet jacket, you can do that at home you stupid gay.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Cry some more

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You’ll be crying when we take this to market, we will de-anonymize everyone on /k/ to give them their big money payout, after we sell to Sig. Then we will all troll you endlessly, at your job, at your home. You’re not even prepared, we’re even contacting your family to get in on the insane trolling. Ahhhhhhhhhh, smart guns will rule the world. #WeWasSmartGunKangz

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              What happens when the QR code is rotated the wrong way?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                the reader will just automatically rotate it, duh

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >b***h laser engrave a QR code on the bullet jacket
              okay, what happens when the ammo is dirty? Or when fouling covers up the lens on the reader?

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Well, it'd be in the mag well, so if you've got fouling getting into your mag you've got a bigger problem.
                It makes much more sense to read the cartridge before it goes into the chamber.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              laser engraving a qr code would be too expensive and like

              What happens when the QR code is rotated the wrong way?

              said, wouldn't work 100% of the time. a simple barcode stamped with ink or paint that wraps around the entire case would be much easier to do and be more reliable. yes it can wear off pretty easily but cases are disposable so you don't need it to be super durable.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >cartridge isn't oriented perfectly for the QR shit to be scanned
              Congratulations, your moronic idea is useless.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Congratulations. You just made cheap FMJ training ammo cost five dollars a round. And also fundamentally killed the handloading industry

        DX encoder like those used on film since the fricking 80s. You don't even need to put it on each bullet, just include it in the box and put a space on the magazine body where you can insert the dx encoder

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >But, gun owners are afraid of electricity for some reason
      We're not we've just seen what happens when you stupid techbro Black folk shove garbage computer chips into every consumer good as a marketing gimmick that does nothing but enshitify the product while making it more expensive and harder to repair. "Yeah I want my toaster to tell me the weather and sync to my phone", statements dreamt up by the utterly deranged.

      https://i.imgur.com/o3jPAWU.jpeg

      >I-Is that an e-e-e-lectronic s-safety!?
      >In March 2014, the California-based Oak Tree Gun Club was criticized for selling the iP1 at its shop, with lobbyists citing the New Jersey law to argue that its owners were acting against U.S. citizens' Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms. Despite evidence to the contrary, the club denied that it had offered the gun.
      >Similar threats, including death threats, were received in May 2014 by an owner of Engage Armaments in Maryland.
      >He also stopped selling the gun, arguing that the pro-gun lobby groups' actions were hypocritical, as they "are not supposed to say a gun should be prohibited. Then you are being no different from the anti-gun people who say an AR-15 should be prohibited."

      See above

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        3 Billion bullets running Java!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >I mean, it'd be relatively simple to [bunch of insanely convoluted bullshit]
      Feels like old /k/ again

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >QR code reader
        >Laser range finder
        >Scope
        Not that complicated.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Implementing all of that into a lightweight, recoil resistance package without compromising the ergonomics of the firearm

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Listen gramps, I know the most modern piece of electronics you interact with is your Windows 95 ass PC, but QR code readers are smaller than a pinhead these days.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          A round counter seems like an unnecessary gimmick.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      you're right and it makes /k/ seethe

      Congratulations. You just made cheap FMJ training ammo cost five dollars a round. And also fundamentally killed the handloading industry

      cartridges have had head stamps for as long as cartridges have had bullets. you don't complain that stamping "9mm" on the back adds to the price do you?

      wouldn't be good for competitions where you want to hand dial in your scope and ammo but I could see it being good for militaries who only have like a dozen different loadings per caliber and just need it to be good enough for braindead grunts

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > cartridges have had head stamps for as long as cartridges have had bullets
        The difference is, a company only has to have one head stamp for 9mm, one for .45 and so on.
        If you had to have one for every single different load, it would absolutely raise the cost.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >it would absolutely raise the cost
          it really wouldn't. it would just need a different die. a good enough laser could engrave a qr code or barcode on the die that's doesn't even incuse the case.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            forgot pic

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            WhyDontWeJust

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              huh? i think it's a stupid idea tbh but it's fun to think about these things, and i happen to know from experience how trivial it would be to change the headstamp based on what loading the cases will be used for.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >But, gun owners are afraid of electricity for some reason

      I'm not buying your startup's smartgun, moronic millennial.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The reader in the magazine idea is pretty stupid, instead you should just have presets on the sight computer itself or be able to enter load data.

      Anyways, minus the magazine reader isn't this what that fancy schmancy new US DMR optic that is being showcased does already?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They've done this for something that looks like a chunky lpvo recently. It's not cheap.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >relatively simple
      Spoken like someone who has no idea how to actually make one
      https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2022/01/07/army-finally-picks-an-optic-for-next-generation-squad-weapon/

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The answer is holosun. They are actually adding Bluetooth stuff to their new equipment with RF so that it can communicate as well. Chunks leading the way yet again.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You don’t want BT or really any potential unpoliced RF emissions anywhere near you in a modern battle space. The reason is contained in that forward ventral fin in picrel.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    what about a sliding notched thing like old iron sights have, that you can put any scope on?

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The tech is certainly there and it's always been there, just never widely implemented. It would work the same as how you normally zero a reticle except instead of MOA increments it would move the reticle down to where it needs to be for every 100 yards you want to adjust it to. In order to do that though you have to design it for a specific loading of a specific caliber shot from a specific gun, and it can't be used on anything else. Alternatively you could just use the ancient tech in pic related.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >just never widely implemented
      There are plenty of slopes you can buy right now that do this already. Burris Eliminator, for example.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Burris Eliminator does not do what I described, however it is much better and is pretty much what OP is looking for, just with a bunch of other unnecessary bells and whistles.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bushnell had their Holo sight with replaceable gratings to switch reticle. But you have to replace the grating itself because that's where the hologram is stored so this can't be done on the fly.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hop. That didnt change the zero, just the reticle

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's the point? Just aim high/low depending on distance/wind and what not. If your shooting at distances beyond what a standard red dot can aid in then just get a scope.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sig made a dual-retical dual-zero red dot optic for their government-adopted dual-ammunition rifle.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just buy a compM5B
    I cleared 100-500 yards using m193 with mine last week. They even include a custom turret and a little drill jig so you can make your own and do stuff like sub/supersonic zeros

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    mostly just the complexity of the geometry, having to add separate lasers all with separate adjustability would just be a huge pain in the dick with a holo sight. red dot should be easier but putting in the actual gears that adjust 2 or more lasers that end up relatively parallel in the end is just dumb hence the universally used 1 reticle with zero marks.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is that pic real or is it a meme?
      It remind me of pic related

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yes it is simplified but real. holographic works the same way as a regular red dot laser emitter, just extra mirrors/angles so you don't see the emitter.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Right now the standard is "get out my little book with all my notes, flip to the page with the correct loading, and then start adjusting the knobs on the scope until they're in the right spot for the range I intend to shoot".
    There is no reason the standard can't be "click through the loadings I programmed in my scope, and then select the estimated range." We have accepted batteries in our optics for two decades or more. Integrated rangefinder would simplify it to "select the correct loading in the scope". There is no reason we can't have this today, we just don't for some reason.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > we just don't for some reason.
      Sig does. It’s not super popular though because it makes the scope more expensive. And all things being equal, most people are going to go with the less expensive option

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I suspect that the jump to "I plugged my scope into my computer and programmed preset aim points for my new .308 load" is going to happen not because people demand it but because it will be a trivial addition to the digital imaging (e.g. thermal) scopes that are rising in popularity. Nobody is demanding a 486 computer in their optic, but if they own a digital scope they have one in there anyway and once prices come down a bit manufactures will start playing with features like that.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > once prices come down a bit manufactures will start playing with features like that.
          And they still won’t be popular, because they’ll drive the price up.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't think it will. The computer is already there and it already has the ability to accept several different digital reticles for the user to cycle through, it's just a matter of a manufacturer releasing either the documentation of how to program a new reticle or releasing the software to program a new reticle. Digital optics are the future and the future is now old man.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              > I don't think it will.
              It will.
              *something* always costs more than *noth8ng*

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It doesn't. They're literally programming the reticle to show up in a certain spot on the digital screen. There is no cost associated with letting people program the reticle to show up somewhere else.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yes, there is.
                It’s the cost of putting in the electronics.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Digital scopes are fully equipped for that. In ten years when 400m thermal scopes are the new LPVO most of them will be fully programmable at home with or without the manufacturer's blessing. And yes that is what I was talking about the whole time, read the reply chain you moron.

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