Real scout rifles don't exist due to the NFA.

Real scout rifles don't exist due to the NFA. The real scout rifle is a suppressed lever-action SBR in a big bore caliber, with a fast twist capable of stabilizing extra-heavy subsonics.

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >heavy subsonic bullet with a rainbow trajectory
    This is pretty much the exact opposite of what a scout rifle was supposed to be.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    rainbow trajectories are gay and that's a good thing
    me and the boys are going to lube up and ring some steel

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why does it have to be lever action? I like lever gats too but the action (and any manual action) is just obsolete and comprehensively inferior to auto loading actions. Tube mags significantly limit capacity too, esp in SBR lever gats. What’s the capacity, like 4 rounds?

    Suppressed 8.6BLK SBR is your scout rifle. You can get it lighter and shorter than Jeff Cooper imagined. If you have to be a contrarian, then get one chambered in 338 federal.

    Your point still stands though. NFA fucks everything up.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >real scout rifle
      Apart from the ''muh real Scotsman'' argument: Cooper defined the scout rifle, and he pretty much completely disagreed with this. Suppressors add weight and length which he considered priorities, lever actions generally (not always) do not allowed spitzer bullets, the big bore caliber means it has a bad trajectory and thus is less useful as a general purpose rifle.

      >You can get it lighter and shorter than Jeff Cooper imagined.
      How would you build an AR-10 to meet weight requirements (6-7 lbs)? I figure an LPVO practically fulfills his LER scope ideas (good situational awareness/FOV, allows rapid reloads). Keep in mind you still need BUIS, sling and bipod.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I’ll admit you’d have to use specialized and hard to acquire parts, especially to offset the added weight of the LPVO, but it wouldn’t be very difficult. Take for example the POF rogue. That in its stock config is sub 6 pounds. It is basically an AR15 in size, just with a bigger magwell. And I have a ~4 pound AR15 in 5.56. Pencil barrel, CF Handguard and stock, vseven receiver.. No reason you couldn’t use similar weight saving measures to bring the weight of the rogue down further. It would be a pain in the ass to source or make parts compatible with the proprietary rogue (like its 1/2” longer buffer tube) but my point is that we are at a point in firearms tech where such a thing is possible to make. If some company set out to make one from scratch, no doubt it can be done, and not even with that much effort.

        And btw, a 350 legend is a big bore high energy thumper, with both super and subsonic loads. No reason you couldn’t use that from a short and light AR15

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is a "scout rifle" primarily a spreadsheet gun?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      in today's world, yes. There really isn't much reason not to have an AR-15 if you're primarily concerned about threats on two legs, or a highly ergonomic, lightweight deer rifle for... well that.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >There really isn't much reason not to have an AR-15 if you're primarily concerned about threats on two legs
        This is what's got me in a bit of a bind right now. I love the idea of some of these different rifles out there, but everything I end up building just simplifies down to "why not just make an AR?". Which sucks because stuff like the RFB (shit gun I know), VHS-2 Hellion, etc etc all LOOK interesting and perform probably within a reasonable margin, but they're not going to do anything a half-assed AR build won't do.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I forget who but someone said Cooper:s scout rifle was a pistol shooters idea of a rifle and I think that's pretty accurate. Hunters who actually go tromping through the woods use regular ass hunting rifles for a reason. If you want something that can flex into survivalism, hunting, and combat then just get an AR with a .22 conversion bolt.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Retarded question but im considering getting one of those cmmg kits with the reliability stuff they sell for it. Whats keeping me from doing that is my boomer dad though. He said that the soft lead from .22 will plug up the gas port over time and shooting a 556 through it will just press the lead residue further up into the gas port. Is there any truth to this?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          NTA, and I don't know the answer to your question. But there is a simple workaround. Instead of just getting the conversion bolt get the kit that has a dedicated .22LR barrel. This means it's a whole upper instead of just a drop-in bolt, however now there's no gas port to plug up, and the twist rate of the dedicated barrel is correct for .22LR so it's much more accurate as well.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I was considering that since it wouldnt cost that much more especially with a cheap barrel but I would prefer it if I could keep the gun as its set up and that would mean I would have to buy a second lpvo, light, etc meanwhile just the drop in kit would allow me to just pull out the bcg, drop the kit in and go on the fly. Would also allow me to just keep it in a bag with the rifle.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              There's pros and cons to either way. Like you said it's cool to just drop a conversion bolt in your gun and then you can use all your existing accessories like optics, light, etc. On the other hand, the accuracy of that kind of conversion is kinda meh, and are you planning on re-zeroing your optic every time you want to change between 22 and 5.56? Having a dedicated upper means you have to buy another optic, but you can get one that's better suited to .22 and not have to fuck with rezeroing.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I have a CMMG bolt conversion I used for several thousand rounds before just buying the rest of the parts to make a standalone 22LR rifle with it. I did not experience any issues with weird leading of the gas port with the conversion but I also never used it for more than a few hundred rounds of 22 before swapping back in the 5.56 bolt and shooting centerfire through it. ie. I would shoot 22 for most of a range trip and finish up with a mag or two of 5.56.
          If you go with the conversion bolt, I recommend getting a Catch22 V2 and using their spacers to use S&W 15-22 magazines. The S&W magazines are far easier to load, have better stack geometry than ceiner style conversion mags, and of course with the Catch22 provide LRBHO so the rifle functions just like it would with 5.56.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Good to know im just a bit scarred because no matter how outlandish my dads claims are they somehow always come true. I swear he has some kind of sixth sense for bad shit thats going to happen.

            There's pros and cons to either way. Like you said it's cool to just drop a conversion bolt in your gun and then you can use all your existing accessories like optics, light, etc. On the other hand, the accuracy of that kind of conversion is kinda meh, and are you planning on re-zeroing your optic every time you want to change between 22 and 5.56? Having a dedicated upper means you have to buy another optic, but you can get one that's better suited to .22 and not have to fuck with rezeroing.

            I wasnt really planning on rezeroing it to be honest, I was thinking of just learning the proper hold with it since it would still mainly be a 556 gun.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Hunters who actually go tromping through the woods use regular ass hunting rifles for a reason.
        I think something like a Howa mini (except w/ a smaller scope and maybe in 6.5 Grendel) would serve nicely as a scout rifle. Howa also has 10-rd mags for this.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Alternatively a Ruger American with a mag well conversion so it can take AR mags. (or convert it to ak mags for extra Hispanicy)
          yeah

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So, a Ruger American?
            https://ruger.com/products/americanRifleRanch/specSheets/26965.html
            https://ruger.com/products/americanRifleRanch/specSheets/36926.html

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Ok I’m a poorfag not caught up with the times. Why the fuck hasn’t anybody put a 100 round C mag in one of these yet.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                they probably have, beta makes towers for the C mag to fit the mini 14

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A big game hunter would only take one or two shots in any engagement in the open wilderness. Why the fuck would he care about a suppressor? The idea of integrated suppression was much more novel and niche back then, but using subsonics would be full retard.

      Yeah. The most striking feature of scout guns is the long eye relief scope with lower magnification for fast shots and better awareness. Today an LPVO on a 308 AR would do the same thing but better.

      I thought the point of it being a manual action rather than an auto loader was it allowed you to transport it wherever you were travelling, hunts in Africa, 'ban resistant' etc.

      I thought it was to help with weight and reliability, considering he made the scout concept back in the 70s. Even back then he was open to semi-autos.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        IIRC local firearms laws were not a consideration for the rifle’s characteristics. Jeff Cooper initially specified a bolt action, but also said that if such a rifle can be made in semi auto, without going above the allowed weight limit, then that would be fine too.. There is no reason for a Semi auto to be more cumbersome to carry on an African safari or whatever than a bolt gun.

        Interesting, I was under the false assumption then that part of it was it was basically just 'Less paperwork' taking a manual action like a bolt action abroad.
        Thanks for enlightening me Anons.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I thought the point of it being a manual action rather than an auto loader was it allowed you to transport it wherever you were travelling, hunts in Africa, 'ban resistant' etc.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      IIRC local firearms laws were not a consideration for the rifle’s characteristics. Jeff Cooper initially specified a bolt action, but also said that if such a rifle can be made in semi auto, without going above the allowed weight limit, then that would be fine too.. There is no reason for a Semi auto to be more cumbersome to carry on an African safari or whatever than a bolt gun.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ruger SFAR

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm planning to get one of these bad boys and use it in a scout/DMR role since we can't really get any good guns for that up here in Canada

    Mags are expensive as hell sadly, but it's the best option I can figure and it looks sexy

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >he doesn't have a single shot scout rifle

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lever actions with modern tactical additions like rails, red dots, silencers, etc are cool as fuck. But don't try to pretend for a minute that they are in any way shape or form practical.

    Even for silenced shots, a .300 blackout bolt action with a short barrel is still the better choice.

    If you want to play Cyberpunk cowboy, go ahead but do so because you want to. Don't try to justify it as filling any kind of unexplored niche in the world of weapons.

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