Quillon Dagger or Bollock Dagger?

Which knife would have been the go-to for an Englishman in the early 18th century? If you know any good sites to buy from, I'd also appreciate it.

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bollock dagger. Luv me wiener n balls grip.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bollock daggers and quillons existed at the same time but AFAIK bollock daggers fell out of fashion later in the medieval period.
    The quillon style has a lot of staying power. Plenty of fighting knives were and still are very similar up to the modern day in pretty much every way other than their length.

    >w2c
    The one in your pic is a Tod Cutler dagger and I have the exact model w/ the same color leather. I like it a lot. Very solid piece. They are really big though. Just be aware of that if you're buying it for anything practical.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's hard to find research on this, but I think the bollock dagger stuck around, because they called it a kidney dagger during the Victorian Era. Here's a pic from Tod Cutler again. It says 15th century, but I think it was one of those things where the design didn't change much over the centuries. Could be wrong about that though.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        How are tod cutler products?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I don't know, but the other people in this thread say he's top notch. He's more medieval though, which is earlier than what I'm looking for.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Quillon if he had the money, bollock daggers were cheaper.

      2nding Tod Cutler. They're reasonably priced, good quality, and generally historically accurate.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I think you're right. Thanks for the response!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >you're buying it for anything practical.
      what are the practical uses of a novelty, reproduction, medieval dagger

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >what are the practical uses of a novelty, reproduction, medieval dagger
        to fricking kill someone

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone know of a decently priced dagger with a blade around 8” and not made of chinesium?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      8", well made and affordable? None.
      At 7" there's the Spartan George Raider dagger. At 9" there's the Chinese-made Odenwolf Sowcatcher (the double-edged version, obviously) which may be built decently enough, I don't know. That's basically it between cheap useless garbage and custom heirlooms. If you're looking for a historical style dagger in that goldilocks range, I don't know that either.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Man. The boker solingen swiss dagger really caught my eye but i cant bring myself to drop $300 on a knife when i could spend that on boolets.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Were Scottish dirks used by normal people in Georgian England? They made their way to the Royal Navy.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That sort of design easily could have been, it's not too far off from the ever common bollock dagger. The highland style dirk, would not have been a thing outside of Scotland.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        From what I've seen, when the dirk did go outside Scotland, it was strictly for military purposes. I've seen two sources say Quillon daggers were around in the 18th century, I just haven't seen an image of one from that period yet, so maybe they don't know either.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    early 18th? neither tbh. That is late. A dirk might be a descendent of bollock daggers, but it isnt one strictly speaking.
    And a stilleto might be a descendent of a quillon dagger, but it isnt one
    >picnotrel

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      (could also go plug bayonet)

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      So how about this question?

      https://i.imgur.com/qq71CQQ.jpg

      Were Scottish dirks used by normal people in Georgian England? They made their way to the Royal Navy.

      Were dirks used by normal people? Also, I didn't know stilletos were contemporary in the Georgian period. I'll have to try to look that up. It seems like nobody cares about daggers after the 1500's. REALLY fricking frustrating.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        it'd be early 18th c (1700ish-1720ish) but yes, we still see super narrow bladed thrusting daggers around
        Re: Disks, you get naval ones (esp. midshipmans) but you also get the classic scottish versions - not really used outside scotland, sure.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It looks like stilettos were more of a Mediterranean thing and dirks were only in Scotland. Amazing that nobody on the internet knows the answer to this.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I finally figured it out if this article is correct:

    http://eighteenthcenturylit.pbworks.com/w/page/129904677/Daggers

    The reason I had such a hard time finding information on 18th century civilian daggers is because daggers were going out of fashion as a primary weapon. During this period, the dagger was used as a supplemental weapon in addition to the sword and the flintlock pistol, which was becoming common among civilians at this time.

    Also, according to this article, the dirk WAS the popular dagger of the time, despite its origin with Scottish nobility. I also read from another source that dirks were used by pirates as well. There, I'm going to be tired as shit at work tomorrow, but it was worth it. Now I just need to buy a dirk. And as we just learned, it doesn't need to be a legit dirk because the common ones in the Georgian era weren't legit either.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      so in other words, plugbayonet anon and dirk anon was right

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Well, I was the one who first brought up dirks. I just thought they were exclusively military and it looks like they weren't, at least according to that article. Plug bayonet anon was not correct because that was just a military thing.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ehh, they were most likely bollock...Shakepeare website says they were popular until the 1800's. They still weren't the primary weapon in the 18th century though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I think part of the confusion may lie in the naming of these weapons.
      If you show someone picrel there is no question it is Scottish and would be unlikely to be seen elsewhere. But

      https://i.imgur.com/qq71CQQ.jpg

      Were Scottish dirks used by normal people in Georgian England? They made their way to the Royal Navy.

      ? I can easily see someone calling that a bollock dagger, and at some point the lines between a bollock dagger and a dirk become very blurred.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >lines between a bollock dagger and a dirk become very blurred.
        The dirk developed from the bollock dagger, it was a slow evolution. Early dirks and bollock daggers are essentially the same thing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I think you're correct. I'm just going to buy a low status dirk and pretend an English craftsman saw the design and copied it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >pretend an English craftsman saw the design and copied it.
          or just get

          https://i.imgur.com/aV91kuL.jpg

          >Which knife would have been the go-to for an Englishman in the early 18th century?
          An alehouse dagger.
          https://todsworkshop.com/products/reivers-dagger-late-16thc?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's very unlikely.
          However if you're going early 18C then just pretend you're sucking up to the new king.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Tod
    >600$ for a dagger

    Like, I get it, they're well-made, but I guess his prices are catching up to his online fame.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wait which website is legit? Theres todcutler and todsworkshop. They both look similar

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They are both legit. One is his "off the shelf" cheaper line, the other is the fancier more custom stuff.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The dirk is just a censored bollock dagger

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Which knife would have been the go-to for an Englishman in the early 18th century?
    An alehouse dagger.
    https://todsworkshop.com/products/reivers-dagger-late-16thc?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >“Long heavie Daggers also, with great brauling Alehouse hilts, (which were ever used but for private faries and braules, and that within lesse than these fortie yeres; since which time through long peace, we have forgotten all orders and discipline Militarie)
      >“the fourth had a short sword, like that which we were want to call an Ale-house dagger, and that was trussed close to his side with a scarfe”
      >“a swapping Ale-dagger at his backe, contayning by estimation, some two or three pounds of yron in the hylts and chape”
      >“Of if there be ruffian that can swagger,
      Make strange bravadoes, wear and ale-house dagger.
      Instead of valour, quarrelling profess,
      Turn hospitality to lewd excess”

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >all these daggers are soon to be illegal in bonglandistan

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have a few of Tod's off the shelf line, including two dirks. They're good enough that I don't regret buying them. Not super sharp as indicated on the website. Last time I saw him get brought up, some anons claimed that the cheaper stuff on todcutler was made by interns, but its not like that would make much of a difference. I'm planning on getting on of his irish skeans next.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *