Powerstation and solar for my DIY truck bed camper

Does anyone know of a fair priced powerstation that can run one of those portable tent A/C units or a swamp cooler? It's got to be expandable and last at least 7 hours. I'd like to DIY a whole solar powerstation rig at some point... it's just... what fricking powerstation do I get

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250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    bluetti

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You need to figure out what devices you are trying to run so you can do the math on their power draw. Then you can pick one.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not OP, but I was hoping to set up a smaller solar system for a shed. Nothing serious, just enough power for lights, some small power tools, cell signal booster, and maybe a small AC/space heater. You guys think a kit like this would be enough, or should I look into something beefier?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        1.84 is plenty enough energy fo-
        >and maybe a small AC/space heater
        annnnnnnnnd there goes your energy.
        AC/Heating is monstrous when it comes to power draw.
        A "small" space heater will drain an entire day of charging in an hour if on full blast. You're going to get 60-70% of that 1.84KW.
        A/C? Fricking forget about it. Heating is more efficient than cooling because well.... There's no power waste with heat. Heat is just power being inefficient producing heat as a wasteproduct.
        Cooling will... also produce heat because it has to go through more hoops. You pump that heat outside most times, but it's still wasting power on heat wasteproduct so you get even less cooling for your electricity usage than you would heat.
        It's also easier to be warm during the cold than cool during the hot.
        A/C is a power-hungry b***h.
        Fans in the shade might work much better for the power cost.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          To expand on that, if you want reliable cooling, get an inverter generator that can do 1500W and get some sort of A/C unit that can vent out the heat.
          Heat, just use a propane/diesel heater. I mean you can use a generator to power an electric heater but now you're just taking the piss, just turn the gas into heat directly instead of turning the gas into electricity and then into heat.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >get an inverter generator that can do 1500W and get some sort of A/C unit that can vent out the heat.
            >Heat, just use a propane/diesel heater
            Would be more efficient, but I was partially hoping to set up a climate controlled storage space that I could just leave alone for a few days at a time. I'd be a bit too nervious leaving a gas generator or a propane heater running unsupervised for a few days. Maybe I'll look into beefier systems

            > prices out a SEER 21 9k minisplit
            $800 is a little low.for a quality unit. I was referring to the cost of power, or how much energy even the most efficient model will draw in a poorly insulated camper/trailer.

            You thought I was referring to the price of the unit. No.

            [...]
            I think he should get a mini-freezer, make popsicles, and stick one up his ass. A lot of blood flows through that sphincter.

            Like above anon says, running aircon or a heater will suck away all your power, requiring a system 3x the original size - for Aircon - and so much bigger than that again, for electric heat, that in the case of regular full-electric heat, you'll never fit it in a mobile application. Maybe a small electric heating pad.

            One of the issues as I pointed out, is trailers etc are poorly insulated. It's more of a problem with heat than aircon, hypothetically, because basically what you are usually doing with aircon is dehumidifying, first. And trailers can be more airtight than they can have a good R value. But because your trailer or van etc must be parked in the sun for it's rooftop panels to work, typically the cabin is absorbing more heat, than if you simply parked in the shade and used a fan.

            Small scale swamp coolers only work well in low humidity. That, therefore is highly dependent on where you are using and building your system. The amount of water needed, can cause issues, too.

            > vet who has been on the street parked multiple places, climates, from near canada, down to texas, and built on an offgrid power system.

            >you'll never fit it in a mobile application.
            >trailers etc are poorly insulated
            clearly stated it was for a shed. the RV pic was just something i grabbed off the Amazon listing. I was even considering splurging a bit on 2x6 framing, so i could fit more insulation

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              If it's a shed, for the price of anything you'd want to do solar, just getting an electrical line out there would be infinitely cheaper. You get a window unit and bam, climate and humidity controlled and you just don't have to worry about it.
              Heating and cooling are extremely power-intensive. There's no way around it.
              To generate enough solar reliably, you'd need an easy 4kw of panels. This by itself could run you $2k if you got them at bargain bin prices and 50x25ft of space.
              Then you need battery capacity like mad. We'll assume it runs hat half-power during the less-cool, less-hot parts of the day (though this is underselling things).
              You'd need nearly 10kwh to 12kwh of battery storage to adequately. in case of shady days where you aren't getting 4kw from your panels.
              This is another 5-8k cost.
              And this isn't counting the inverter and solar charge controller. Throw in another thousand or two for one that won't burn your shed down or be inefficient, because cheap ones will suck away hundreds of watts just by being on.
              So for way over $10k.... You can get an electrician to just run you some lectric for you climate control.

              However if you can do without climate control, cost goes down dramatically. If you just want some lights and to charge your power tools and booster, a single 200W panel into something like an ecoflow delta 2 would be plenty. $150 for a panel, plugged into a refurbished delta 2 that goes for $600 after taxes. EZPZ.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Jackary has sales from time to time. WAIT for a sale.

    Would go with those over a bluetti or ecoflow model. Just on a value proposition. Quality is fine.

    It's not that established players (jackary has been around awhile tho too) jack up their prices, exactly. It's that costs keep dropping, and yet some, like Battleborn, don't keep up with pricing trends, so people get an Ampere Time (Li Time) or other brand, for $300 instead of $800.

    Be wary that if you go the component route, e.g. 12v 100ah LFPO battery, and think about DIY'ing in a DC-to-DC 25amp charger (pricey mind you), and an inverter..

    that, for the battery, you get Li Time, or another competent assembler (see Will Prowse's teardowns and forum). It's not that the core cells suck so much, at this point, it's that the rest of the build quality varies a lot, and the BMS varies, too. Li Time has been putting larger BMS's in their 'trolling motor' builds, getting up to 5 seconds at 500CCA. Dakota Lithium is the only one I know of with claims of 1000CCA out of a 60ah $600 battery.

    Lemme spec it out for you:
    KEEP your dum dum lead acid starter battery. Add a pure sine wave inverter of 2000 watts, wzrelb on ebay is a decent inverter. It's cheaper than a DC to DC and provides AC 120v. Wire that into your main harness; you'll be pulling something like a 2/0 or 4/0 cable from the starter battery with a redonkulous fuse, like 200amps, and use the chassis (like a seat bolt) for the ground, and stick it under the passenger seat. UPGRADE your ground strap at the battery, particularly to chassis (vs engine). So e.g. both ground straps should be 4/0.

    Run a regular orange 18g extension cord to wherever your charger is for your Li Time (trailer) or not if it's in-cab. I personally would mount that in a toolbox, in a battery case.

    Have an either/or type high current switch, to pull power from starter/alternator & engage the lfpo charger, or pull power from the Li Time. Or just buy 2x wzrelbs inverters.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Are these just basically a battery with an inverter? I tried to look up exactly what they are electrically but literally all search results are gay companies trying to sell shit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They are an all-in-one (growatt, MPP, DEYE, sol ark, eg4, schneider, outback etc) with the LFPo battery built-in. They can accept solar, too, or AC (grid/generator). But look closely at the specs: with the jackary you could put a couple of stick-on flexible panels on the roof of the cab, and run them to the jackary's solar inputs. It's limited to 60v, whereas the full-on all-in-ones usually start at an input limit of 250v, for a long string of series panels x 2.

      Do not buy junk. You don't want it pulling an ebike firework show in your cab.

      Jackary, ... look on prowse's reviews.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's rare you hear something good, I was seeing these advertised and thinking, hoping it wasn't, is this just some way of packaging and overpricing an inverter and handful of double A cells. When I hear phrases like "solar generator" my mind is like a cat with and arched back and its claws out

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No one uses AA cells. Are your moronic? Do you mean 18650's or their upscaled cousin?

          All in one portable units with integrated battery have been around since Goal Zero's YETI. However, they sat on their hands in development and other companies surpassed them.

          Take some time to read mobile-solarpower.com or diysolarforum.com.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The better power packs are going to be LiFePO4 batteries and have all the connections and ports you'd ever realistically need. I priced out the cost to DIY and it's not actually that bad when you consider how expensive LiFePO4 cells can be, plus a pure sine inverter and figuring out how to package all that stuff together. They also usually have cooling fans and software load managing to the extend battery life.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Im going to say I invented this as I never saw some1 with a portable camping shit until I built 1. its a solar panel feeding an MPPT boost converter. SO say your panel is 36 volts DC the MPPT controls the charge state and can convert that 36 volts to lets say a 48 volt battery. If your battery is 48 volts, most inverters are 12 volts. So you need a buck converter to convert the 48 Volts to 12 volts that feed the inverter. The Buck converter will have an amp rating that will limit your wattage totals on your pluggy like the inverter will. So you need a buck converter capable of handling 1000watts to run a 1000watt inverter and be able to handle a 1000watt load. Either that or omit the buck converter and MPPT by having a 12 volt solar panel feed a standard solar charge controller feed a 12volt battery that feeds a 12 volt inverter. I dont do solar because I can charge from my cigarette lighter, hotels and full charge before I leave. I just am not away from a charging spot for long enough to justify adding solar and can use a 150volt inverter attached to the cars cigarette light attached to a charging wart, to use a vehicle as a gas powered generator in a pinch

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The advantage is its modular so you can hot swap 600wh batteries in and out or switch to a 300wh battery if you need to lighten the load or make it more compact. If youre running 36volt packs you can swap those into most motor driven appliances like an E-bike

            The other advantage is the setup is a good test bench for batteries. Since you can hook up a battery where the label says 300watts. attach a known load of Watt hours and count the hours to determine their true watt hours. If theres a major discrepancy you can open the battery up and start repairing it.

            The disadvantage is the rating on the buck converter limits the maximum amount of load and adds an additional component of size and weight.

            Obviously I dont see alot of scrap 12 volts around. They seem more rare.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The advantage is its modular so you can hot swap 600wh batteries in and out or switch to a 300wh battery if you need to lighten the load or make it more compact. If youre running 36volt packs you can swap those into most motor driven appliances like an E-bike

            The other advantage is the setup is a good test bench for batteries. Since you can hook up a battery where the label says 300watts. attach a known load of Watt hours and count the hours to determine their true watt hours. If theres a major discrepancy you can open the battery up and start repairing it.

            The disadvantage is the rating on the buck converter limits the maximum amount of load and adds an additional component of size and weight.

            Obviously I dont see alot of scrap 12 volts around. They seem more rare.

            Also the inverters able to handle 36volt or 48volt batteries seem to always be priced higher than the 12 volt inverters and always have a higher rating like 800 to 1000 watts. Its hard pressed to find a smaller 1 like 400 watts and not priced as low.

            The Buck converter also creates the additional tap. So if you need to power 12 volt DC you just power off a whip from the buck converter. If you need 36volt, you got the whip from the battery while the inverter handles all your A/C and usb cabled devices.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Workflow for me is. 36 volt e-bike to 12 volt diesel camping heater to 120volt ac appliances like a shop light, to Charging smaller battery banks and phones from the inverters USB port. Its all there and I use them.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            > I invented it

            https://genasun.eu/collections/genasun-boost-mppts

            Genasun makes a boost MPPT. For i.e. when you have a single residential solar panel as your electric golf cart topper, operating at ~35v, but your batteries are 48v.

            As far as the rest of your post, I kinda glazed over it. You, however, did not invent the boost controller part; that was already done.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              When did I say I invented a solar power boost controller? I invented a portable battery pack to take tent camping. (outside of an RV). youre welcome.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                > I invented

                You didn't invent shit. It was already in the marketplace.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Oh btw I didnt read your post. And also I cant read (fricking idiot)

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Your post started out moronic, so no I don't read the rest. Your response is further evidence that you are moronic, and your opinion is meaningless. Go complain to your pops for losing his wad.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ....so instead of a DC-to-DC charging interface, which costs more than an inverter, and requires running dedicated DC heavy gauge to the DC to DC then aux battery (the lfpo), you get one (or two) inverters. The most you'll likely ever run is 2x 100ah LFPo Li Time's, so 1000w is technically enough inverter on a 40-55amp LFPo charger. But spring the extra $40 for the 2000w.

    One 2000w inverter and one 50amp LFPo charger is going to cost you the same or less than an equivalent DC to DC, and provide more value.

    You may want to go with 2x Li Time's in parallel or one large 200ah- I would. And then you can go with a 50ah LFPo charger from the start; like a PM3-55. You want about a 0.2C charge rate; that's 40 amps on 200ah of batteries. They can be charged slightly faster; consider that you're unlikely to be charging 200ah from ZERO to 100% in one go (heat buildup).

    And get the batteries with internal heaters. I think the trolling series have those. LFPo cannot charge below freezing. A non-heater model, with a proper low temp sensor, will just turn-off (disconnect internally), rendering it useless in the cold.

    You are essentially off-grid: 2x inverters will provide you with two sources of AC 120v. That's a minimum. You could throw in an ultra quiet harbor freight 2kw inverter generator for a 3rd. Two is one and one is none when you are offgrid.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ...

      > t. been offgrid for many years. In many locations. Currently have natural gas (well, no power required), springwater, solar, generator, 48v system.

      You've got to have redundancy. Particularly with that vehicle setup, it's easy.

      TLDR: Jackary 3000 pro -w or wo an extra (proprietary) battery- if you are squeamish, or demand the portability. I do like the portability and integration, but not the mark-up. I have a disabled offgrid vet fren who went the Jackary route. He currently uses a generator an hour and a half a day to power up the jackarys. Has a roof for solar but where he has trees, it would not be that useful. He has NG well too, but needs to go through a process to get it honored. Then he can have a NG powered generator kick on to provide charging for the Jackarys.

      If you use corded tools, then that leans towards a jackary. But most tools these days are cordless, so you charge in the toolbox behind the cab, or cab itself, on the passenger floor - then operate the tool cordlessly.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ... me again^ re-reading your post.

    For aircon, you're looking at min 400ah 12v LFPO / 5.1x kw batteries. The EG4, SOK, etc come in a rack server form factor, are 48v nominal, and run around $1400 ea. You can DIY (davidpoz) from two good batteries and a BMS and box and get something like 10kw for 2k. He has a video on that.

    Even a SEER 21 inverter minisplit 9k, is going to cost a reasonable amt of power. More than lights, efficient fridge, pump, and misc, put together.

    If you're just a normal frick, you can get by with 200ah or even 100ah at first, on 12v. But muh aircon is going to quadruple the starting system size. Plus, the insulation value of a truck camper isn't great.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You can grab minisplits off Amazon/eBay for $500 these days. 17ish SEER. 21-22 SEER models are $800.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > prices out a SEER 21 9k minisplit
        $800 is a little low.for a quality unit. I was referring to the cost of power, or how much energy even the most efficient model will draw in a poorly insulated camper/trailer.

        You thought I was referring to the price of the unit. No.

        To expand on that, if you want reliable cooling, get an inverter generator that can do 1500W and get some sort of A/C unit that can vent out the heat.
        Heat, just use a propane/diesel heater. I mean you can use a generator to power an electric heater but now you're just taking the piss, just turn the gas into heat directly instead of turning the gas into electricity and then into heat.

        I think he should get a mini-freezer, make popsicles, and stick one up his ass. A lot of blood flows through that sphincter.

        Like above anon says, running aircon or a heater will suck away all your power, requiring a system 3x the original size - for Aircon - and so much bigger than that again, for electric heat, that in the case of regular full-electric heat, you'll never fit it in a mobile application. Maybe a small electric heating pad.

        One of the issues as I pointed out, is trailers etc are poorly insulated. It's more of a problem with heat than aircon, hypothetically, because basically what you are usually doing with aircon is dehumidifying, first. And trailers can be more airtight than they can have a good R value. But because your trailer or van etc must be parked in the sun for it's rooftop panels to work, typically the cabin is absorbing more heat, than if you simply parked in the shade and used a fan.

        Small scale swamp coolers only work well in low humidity. That, therefore is highly dependent on where you are using and building your system. The amount of water needed, can cause issues, too.

        > vet who has been on the street parked multiple places, climates, from near canada, down to texas, and built on an offgrid power system.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Jackery and Bluetti seem seriously overpriced to me. I bought a knockoff power pack and 100W folding solar panel and have no problems with it at all. They're not very complicated devices and all seem very similar, just go by the specs. I use mine for electronics which are low demand, if you're running AC for 7 hours that sounds like quite a lot of power needed though, you may be better off DIYing with some car batteries and an inverter. Work out what you need first then go shopping.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      OP is unclear about whether he wants an actual AC unit or a swamp cooler. Real AC consumes a shitload of power and I wouldn't bother with trying to run one off of a portable battery pack. Swamp coolers on the other hand are simple and only require power for a fan and optionally a small pump. Those could feasibly be run off a battery and if you were desperate to do it you could hang wet rags in front of an M18 fan to get similar results.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    vague question with vague information gets vague answer.

    depends.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    at this point a solar panel system witha battery is farm more economic and really extremely powerful
    you can get 48v systems with a good size solar panel and battery , basically power everything even air conditioner

    but when it comes to those batteries
    you need to see what the wattage peaks
    you need one that goes 3k and it will run everything
    these run like almost 2k

    otherwise a 500 watt jackery will run most small stuff, laptop tv blender
    it will run an elon musk satelight for like 5 hrs

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i have a 500 watt jackery
    yes you can find all these batteries on sale like half off during the holidays
    also you need to scour websites like dealnews
    they are great places to find these
    i saw one for 800 3k model t
    these usually go for 2 3k

    but my 500 is perfect for my laptop
    i run it in my cabin and if its charged to begin with it will last me a good 5 hrs watching videos

    it also runs my led light setup

    i dont even have the solar for it cause i heard its slow
    i just charge it and use it
    it will last a day

    its also super usefull for charging tool batteries
    like dewalt

    i would reccomend buying 2 3 500 watt ones
    you can get them 300 200 if you dont mind random chinese brands

    saying this i also have has generators in case
    like my well i have a 10k gas generator

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    there are youtube channels dedicated to this
    one dude i watched took an all in one unit and put it on a dolly
    solar panels on the ground
    he had portable 48v 3k power
    thats enought to run tools

    also cheap for like 2 3kcost
    solar battery setup is the way to go really

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the main advantage the jackery has it has life variable ac dc
    so you can charge it with a lot diff things
    you can actually charge them while you drive with ciggarette ligher whole

    also they can use a ton off the market panels

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have a Delter 2 max. Been good so far. Been on factory default firmware. did not want to update firmware because horror stories on forums

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ive had this idea for tools before, but doesn't it make more sense to use the car to charge the battery instead of the sun?

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Is it worth buying these ? i lookedup all the parts and it seems that i can build 1000wh output station and 4x100w panel for around $450, why are they like $1000 ?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >why are they like $1000
      convenience

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      LifePO4 batteries are expensive

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      portability and convenience
      most people dont know basic electrical
      and you can have a nice day

      but those jackery are very usefull if you need to move
      like those 3k watt ones can run a well

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Solar generator / power bank buying guide:

    1) Brand:
    --Most power banks are made in China, even the American-sounding brands
    --Lots of new companies/brands are coming out every year
    --Established brands like bluetti, ecoflow, and jackery charge high premiums but usually don't offer better performance. You're mainly paying for the lower risk of buying a junk product
    --Sometimes a brand new company will sell junk at a discount price, and just reopen with a different name once word gets out
    --To avoid overpaying and avoid buying junk, get a power bank that has been reviewed by an independent expert who reviews multiple brands. A person who only reviews one brand could be a shill
    --here are two comparison guides by such reviewers: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1awHqs-0xKGT2xFsYSDaJ9ld7PRqCpeeVTQ_rt6bPxXg
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1BZLY89iHF94vO2enPln7_HjlH-_IkgSbCfh3ofZ1h0c

    2) Price:
    --Prices are dropping every year (even with inflation)
    --A few years ago, $1.00 per watt-hour was a fair price. Currently, $0.40 per watt-hour is a fair price
    --You can find power banks priced around $0.30 per watt-hour from brand new companies, to $1 per watt-hour from established companies
    --Additional features like fast-charging, app connectivity, etc, can raise the price a bit too

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      3) Battery chemistry
      --LiFePO4 is the current industry leader in terms of number of charge cycles and safety
      --Lithium ion (Li-ion) and nickel manganese cobolt (NMC) are cheaper but significantly worse in terms of durability, and could be unsafe in certain conditions
      --There is variation even within LiFePO4 batteries. Some are rated for 2000 cycles, others are rated for 4500 cycles
      --The actual number of cycles is difficult for independent reviewers to verify, so don't pay a big premium for a LiFePO4 battery advertising 4500 cycles because it could be a false claim that will take years to refute. Moreover, even if a battery lasts 4500 cycles, that's over 10 years of daily use, and there will likely be significantly better and cheaper batteries available sooner than that.

      4) Technical specs
      --Watts is a measure of how much power can be drawn from the power bank simultaneously at one time
      --Watt-hours is a measure of how much power the battery can store
      --Usually the Watts and Watt-hours of a power bank are roughly the same, meaning it can work for about one hour at maximum power
      --Some appliances draw a lot of power for a fraction of a second when starting up, and then reduce their power intake. Many power banks can accommodate such a brief spike even if they can't sustain it for a long time (continuous AC output vs max AC output).
      --Some power banks are expandable with a separate battery module that adds Watt-hours but does not change the Watts.
      --The efficiency of the AC inverter is normally around 85%. Thus, the advertised capacity of watt-hours should be multiplied by 0.85 to get the actual capacity

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        5) Additional features
        -fast charging (how quickly can the power bank recharge)
        -pass through charging (can the power bank recharge and discharge at the same time)
        -uninterruptible power supply mode (can the power bank start discharging immediately when power to it is cut off)
        -noise of inverter (how loud the fan is when the power bank is being used)
        -app connectivity (can the power bank be connected to an app and controlled remotely)
        -auto shutoff mode (keeping the power bank on drains a small amount of power. Does the power bank shut itself off automatically after some time to conserve power)

        Same considerations in points 1) and 2) apply to solar panels, with the additional caveat that if you're going to buy multiple panels or expand your array in the future, it's best to get all panels from the same brand

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          All that said, if you want a specific brand recommendation, I recommend Oupes. They're relatively cheap compared to popular brands but have good specs, have been around for a while, and have a growing selection of products. I've personally owned and a couple of their power banks for over a year with daily use and they work great so far.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Got a semi-chink made box with a 12.8V 100Ah LFPO battery and a 1000W sinewave inverter.
    Apparently the inverter wastes up to 15 watts when running.
    The fans engage when the inverter outputs more than 50-60 watts.
    So I bought 12V lights and other accessories to save on the inverter usage (and fans noise).

    I also experimented at home, running stuff, taking note of usual and peak power.
    Noticed that the claimed "1000W nominal, 1600W peak for 2 seconds" is bullshit.
    It seems to sustain 800-900W (enough for a microwave), barely keeps up with 1200-1300W peak for half a second.

    No solar panel, yet at least 80% of the claimed 1280 watt/hours are there, so I can camp at least three days without charging.
    It sports a couple USB ports; phone charging will be slow but hey, it saves me an extra powerbank.
    Clearly I won't park the car in full sun.

    I wouldn't go for homemade shit. I'm not fond of aborting a mission because some component was way too chink.

    • 3 weeks ago
      BecauseISaidSo

      Hard to follow who is who, in a thread, but if that's your only contribution, here is my criticism&advice (you posted publicly so that's what happens):

      You always derate chinese ratings by 25%. If it says 2000w on an inverter, you never load more than 1500. Unless it has a very strong track record, supported by other reasons (GroWatt, and the newer EG4s, only for examples, there are some others). Signature Solar / EG4 (technically different corporations) 6000w units (and I think the 18k) are OEM'd by Luxpower. Whereas an earlier 6k (I think the 6500 something) had a bad history of lemon-itis.

      A lot of chinese producers, have no conscious, at all - will cut all kinds of corners. To the point of you scratching your head, why would they in such a self-destructive way? There is word of mouth, and you are going to tell everyone on these boards that it's a lemon. Censorship? I know every company has a CCP rep, maybe like the funny handshake club - you can't say anything bad about member's companies.

      Usually if someone is doing a 12v system, the minimum advised inverter is 2000w, pure sine wave, like an WZRELB. 2000w because the assumption on a U.S. 120v outlet is it can handle 1500. Once you add in surges from motors (like power tools) it's easily up in the 2000+ watt range. 12v systems max out around 3kw.

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