Pistol Over Arm

I see this come up now and again in relation to the era of flintlock pistols. Is there a reason for this?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    a way to steady the gun with your offhand
    there isn't much else to hold to

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What stance is it called or is there any name for it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        People didn't sperg out and name every single body position back then. You would just say that you braced your pistol on your arm. You think they said shit like "I transitioned from a Weaver hold to a one-handed Isosceles stabilization position"?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    t. ocelot

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stabilizing the weapon while aiming it for a longer-distance shot.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Is there a reason for this?
      trying to hit the broadside of the proverbial barn.

      flintlocks have a long lock time, and an extremely heavy cock and hammer, and both are situated off the side of the weapon. the cock is the thing that most people would call the hammer, on a flintlock that's actually the cock (which is where the term "cocking" comes from - originally it was the cock you were pulling back until the sear set). anyway, the cock is a big chunk of metal, and on the end of it there is a set of big heavy jaws and a screw, that hold a heavy strip of lead or leather wrapped around a heavy chunk of flint. you pull the trigger and the cock with all that mass springs forward and hits the hammer (also called the frizzen) which also rotates forward. a quarter second or so later the sparks and priming charge have finally made it to the main charge and the bullet starts moving.

      but there's an awful lot of time between pulling the trigger and the ball leaving the barrel, with a lot of bits of the gun that are yanking it off target. all this is bad enough with a flintlock rifle, but it's really bad on a pistol, because their locks are usually only slightly smaller than a rifle or musket lock.

      Flintlock grips sucked and the pistols were unbalanced and heavy. Resting it on a support arm was thought to reduce sway.

      nobody is going to mention that these things were probably a shrapnel risk to put a forward hand grip on?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >probably
        they weren't. even barrels made by hammering strips of wrought iron around a mandrel and forge welding a seam down them to make a barrel is strong enough to handle black powder pressures with a huge safety margin.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          unless your brandon harrera

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            never heard of him. is he a famous blacksmith?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              famous improvised explosive device connoisseur

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          unless there was a cold spot

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            proof testing was a thing even back then.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I am just memeing that's my favourite scene in a book I read, that's the only way I loosely know what you wrote.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cqc

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there a reason for this?
    trying to hit the broadside of the proverbial barn.

    flintlocks have a long lock time, and an extremely heavy cock and hammer, and both are situated off the side of the weapon. the cock is the thing that most people would call the hammer, on a flintlock that's actually the cock (which is where the term "cocking" comes from - originally it was the cock you were pulling back until the sear set). anyway, the cock is a big chunk of metal, and on the end of it there is a set of big heavy jaws and a screw, that hold a heavy strip of lead or leather wrapped around a heavy chunk of flint. you pull the trigger and the cock with all that mass springs forward and hits the hammer (also called the frizzen) which also rotates forward. a quarter second or so later the sparks and priming charge have finally made it to the main charge and the bullet starts moving.

    but there's an awful lot of time between pulling the trigger and the ball leaving the barrel, with a lot of bits of the gun that are yanking it off target. all this is bad enough with a flintlock rifle, but it's really bad on a pistol, because their locks are usually only slightly smaller than a rifle or musket lock.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I suppose this is why dueling with pistols was a thing, there was a good chance you could miss. Unless...

      >A further type of duel, known as a barrier duel or a duel à volonté (at pleasure) had the duellists walk towards each other. As the distance closed they could fire at will. But if the first to fire missed, he was required to stand still and wait for his opponent's shot.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Kinda fascinating how dueling culture has been crushed out of existence despite being very, very present for centuries.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          A human life holds a lot more inherent value after the Industrial Revolution.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          A human life holds a lot more inherent value after the Industrial Revolution.

          Nah, it's the legal system. As the legal system continuously matured, there quickly became no justification for consensual murder over petty disputes when it was much more economical for both parties to just battle it out in court.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It absolutely was. Georges Clemenceau always preferred pistols for duels because, in his words
        >A bullet can go anywhere, but a sword is going somewhere

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      with flintlocks It's cause it was a heavy somebitch like said.

      With modern guns, it's for when you have something in your other hand, like a flashlight. Usually have that on the gun instead these days, though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This has got to be it
      I've noticed before the delay in the cock going off and the weapon firing with these old guns
      Compare the wheellock at the timestamp to the percussion shotgun at the end of the vid. Vids seem to be playing back at the same speed so that shouldn't be a factor.

      ?t=95

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        *matchlock not wheellock

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i think my sister said that if anyone tried to take the gun from you, you can slap them with your weak hand

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Flintlock grips sucked and the pistols were unbalanced and heavy. Resting it on a support arm was thought to reduce sway.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Explain how to hold this in a stabilizing way when everything forward of the trigger guard is an OWIE HOT zone. Unless you enjoy the idea of having your hand set on fire by the fire pan of course.

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