ok so why aren't there other WIDE suppressors like the one that GD put on their NGSW bid? if it works the same

ok so why aren't there other WIDE suppressors like the one that GD put on their NGSW bid?
if it works the same
and it's shorter
why the frick would i not want this
i don't care about the girth, i've never had a situation where i go "wow thank god my suppressor is so thin otherwise it'd be a pain in the ass to move my gun around"

but i have been in a situation where i go "wow it would be cool if my gun wasn't so long"

it's like im taking crazy pills.
>yeah but the handguard won't fit over it
who cares
>it looks dumb
frick you

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    it looks dumb

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      frick you

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You sound "vaccinated"

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      frick you

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It had to be said

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah sorry OP but looking cool >>>>> effectiveness

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I agree it's the best part of the nigsaw. Genuinely shocked we didn't see a dozen variants at shot show.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    ive always wanted a delta-p like chode silencer

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >if it works the same
    it doesn't work the same. as you trade more length for girth you lose efficiency. a lot of the function of the suppressor is in the gas jet being stripped by each subsequent baffle. as those baffles get fewer and/or the spacing between them shrinks more of the core of the propellant gasses just exit the suppressor directly.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >as you trade more length for girth you lose efficiency.
      what does that even mean. are you saying there's not a linear relationship between length and girth? i can't have a 1 inch long suppressor 10 feet wide and it totally silences the gun?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        internal volume is only one part of what makes suppressors quiet. It mostly just comes down to creating turbulence and slowing down gasses before they exit the suppressor.
        The shorter a suppressor is, the less distance you have to pack in baffles, but wider baffles are more effective since they induce more expansion of gas between each layer

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you drive under a freeway overpass holding down your horn, how long will it echo?
        Now how long will it echo if you hold the horn through a 200 ft tunnel?
        The horn is exhaust gas and the echo is the amount of effectiveness at holding it in.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        No because the gasses will travel the 1 inch out of the can, thus reducing the pressure and drawing out more gas, before they travel 10 feet outwards along the width

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Basically yes. Each baffle strips a certain fraction of the gas and there's limited ways of improving that fraction. Instead, we use a series of baffles, each one cutting the expanding gass by a fraction until there's almost nothing left. The performance of the suppressor is a function of how many baffles you've got.

        What girth actually does is make the suppressor more reliable. By giving the gas somewhere to expand you keep the whole thing from exploding.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >The performance of the suppressor is a function of how many baffles you've got.
          Baffles?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Oh now that's interesting. Not only do you have this big initial chamber and spirally cut secondary chambers but you've also got these baffled vents for the initial chamber so instead of having gas pressure stack up there at high rates of fire it's all vented out the front.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Yes it flow through suppressor that is folded, exhaust baffles attached to the sides instead of end of suppressor.
              Flow design through has advantage of low back pressure.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I believe that for gasses, a series of narrower baffles is going to act like a tesla valve does for liquid. You simply cannot recreate that in a very short suppressor. However, the OP has pictured a flow through suppressor? I'm not aware of any reason a short fat suppressor could not be viable with the flow through technology. Does anyone know what it's decibel reduction rating is?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        if you unfold a flow through-suppressor it's just a geometrically rearranged baffle suppressor at the expense of suppressing effect to marginally lower back pressure.
        >flow-through
        is just a marketing term.
        if it isn't a marketing term, strictly define what a flow-through suppressor is and post some cross section and I'll point out the baffles.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >if it isn't a marketing term, strictly define what a flow-through suppressor is
          Gas moves around the outside of the baffles, instead of getting stuck in them, and can continue moving without retracing it's path to exit the front of the suppressor, typically with exits off center of the main bore line. I would say it's most defining characteristic is that the gas does not have to retrace it's path back out of the baffle to exit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/sqdNHdm.jpg

            Its based on their patent.

            some gas never interacts with the baffles in every suppressor. it's only a matter of degree.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >strictly define what a flow-through suppressor is
          Suppressor with the design that has another gas vents for gas to exit out besides hole for bullet.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            so if you drill a hole in any normal suppressor it becomes a flow-through?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              It would stop been suppressor so wouldnt fit definition.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                so if you put an extra hole in the end cap it stops being suppressor all together?
                that seems disingenuous to imply as almost all the suppressing effect will be retained.
                and you drill extra holes in a normal can to make a "flow-through" anyway, at the expense of suppression level. so I don't see how it is different.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >so if you put an extra hole in the end cap it stops being suppressor all together?
                Then you will make shitty flow through suppressor.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Nah bro, you need to drill a hole in the back end and then baffle that end as well.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    GD's bullpup rifle was able to get away with using a small suppressor because they also used a long barrel and polymer cased ammo. The long barrel meant more powder was burned before it got to the end of the barrel, while the polycase ammo inherently uses less powder then brass case ammo, further reducing the muzzle flash.

    In their own words, GD said it was a "smuzzle", rather than a suppressor.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >the polycase ammo inherently uses less powder
      as someone who has been autisming about internal ballistics for several years in a row and has everything fresh in their mind this is not physically possible to a degree where it is relevant
      I reversed your image and the explanations they are giving in the video for this are bullshit
      Internal casing shape has such marginal effects on burning efficiency it isn't considered in cartridge development
      Optimised flow cases produce something in the range 0.1-0.2% improvement (in small calibers, the improvement worsens with increased cartridge size) but it is disregarded because having a cartridge shape that feeds well is more important
      Very little heat is also transferred into a gun in terms of raw energetic potential and the main transfer window is AFTER peak burn and the primary heat transfer is INTO THE BARREL not the receiver
      The video doesn't provide information on what brass ammo was used, nor what polymer case ammo was used but looking at TV's website atleast all of their commercial available ammo is low velocity for being .308 (2650 from 24" vs M80 FMJ @ 2800 from 16") with heavier bullets (165 gr vs M80 @ 147 gr)
      This degree of being underloaded, combined with a potentially higher speed powder would explain the flash difference
      This is absolute and total marketing bullshit.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I disagree for a couple reasons. First is that GD's rifle had to pass the same muzzle velocity tests as everyone else and they did it with less muzzle flash, thus the smaller suppressor. Second is that I've scene thermal camera recordings of polymer case vs brass case being fired from guns. The poly case ammo is always heating the gun less by a substantial degree, which does lend credence to the notion that a significant amount of heat is being shielded from the weapon by the polymer casing, resulting less energy lost to thermal absorption by the casing and chamber. This is concordant with the notion that poly cases require less powder to get the same muzzle energy as brass case ammo.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Nothing you are saying touches his points

          >the polycase ammo inherently uses less powder
          as someone who has been autisming about internal ballistics for several years in a row and has everything fresh in their mind this is not physically possible to a degree where it is relevant
          I reversed your image and the explanations they are giving in the video for this are bullshit
          Internal casing shape has such marginal effects on burning efficiency it isn't considered in cartridge development
          Optimised flow cases produce something in the range 0.1-0.2% improvement (in small calibers, the improvement worsens with increased cartridge size) but it is disregarded because having a cartridge shape that feeds well is more important
          Very little heat is also transferred into a gun in terms of raw energetic potential and the main transfer window is AFTER peak burn and the primary heat transfer is INTO THE BARREL not the receiver
          The video doesn't provide information on what brass ammo was used, nor what polymer case ammo was used but looking at TV's website atleast all of their commercial available ammo is low velocity for being .308 (2650 from 24" vs M80 FMJ @ 2800 from 16") with heavier bullets (165 gr vs M80 @ 147 gr)
          This degree of being underloaded, combined with a potentially higher speed powder would explain the flash difference
          This is absolute and total marketing bullshit.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I don't think there's any way I can my get my perspective across if that's the case. I tried to explain it as best I could and there's not much more to say.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Heat transfer. Plastic doesn't take heat from the early gass, allowing it to burn faster and more complete.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                how significant of a heat difference is it?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Isn't it true that you could do the weatherby double radius neck venturi geometry ezpz for no extra cost and eke out that extra velocity with the polymer ammo?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >as someone who has been autisming about internal ballistics for several years in a row
        So absolutely nothing then. Yeah no sorry I'm going to the word of actual engineers over some midwit reading wikipedia.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What's her name?

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Double as alcohol stove

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the looks of that thing didn't do it any favors

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Is this actually how they're designed internally? Looks sick.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Nah, most are designed like this. That Brevis Delta model is something special.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        Oh now that's interesting. Not only do you have this big initial chamber and spirally cut secondary chambers but you've also got these baffled vents for the initial chamber so instead of having gas pressure stack up there at high rates of fire it's all vented out the front.

        [...]
        That's really smart engineering

        No that model is just a blender model some gun autist on twitter made, it's just speculation even though it might be true.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Its based on their patent.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >The performance of the suppressor is a function of how many baffles you've got.
      Baffles?

      That's really smart engineering

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Are these 3D printed? Are they heavier than a normal suppressor?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://www.deltapdesign.com/products/deltapdesgin/suppressor/595/brevis-ii-ultra-556-nato-rifle-suppressor
        https://www.deltapdesign.com/products/deltapdesign/suppressor/brevis-ii-556-nato-rifle-suppressor
        They are 3 printed. Titanium is 7.5 oz, heavy duty (ie full auto) inconel 11.5 oz.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    too thick to fit up my ass

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Too thick to fit up that guy's ass.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      not once im done with you, homosexual

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