Non American here. In terms what is the difference between the National Guard and the Reserves?

Non American here. In terms what is the difference between the National Guard and the Reserves?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    id like to cum in her face if you catch my drift

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      *in terms of military capability. I'm aware the states have control of the National Guard, unless it is placed under control of the President. But I am talking about during wartime and training and equipment.

      >her

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        its a dude

        Hypothetically speaking, if someone jerked off to those pictures before knowing they were a dude, is that someone gay now?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Unless you stopped being attracted to women you're just bi or pan

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          nah you're good. it's only gay if you know it's a man.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      its a dude

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure natty guard responds to domestic shit like riots, natural disasters and shit while the reserves hold people in reserve (obviously) to be called up if we need more troops.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Whenever there's a major problem I always hear someone say call the National Guard. I never heard anyone say call the Army Reserves or active duty or whatever.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Because the Army isn't trained to respond to domestic events like the National Guard is

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Federal Armed Forces are not allowed to intervene in domestic affairs or disasters without permission from State Governors. The Southern States after losing the Civil War and regaining Congress seats passed this into law.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          This isn't true at all retard. Posse Comitatus has been a principle of US law since before the revolution.

          Of course, the Insurrection Act also provides a legal framework for using the military in a true crisis, which is why Marines got sent in to put down the LA riots.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Posse Comitatus has been a principle of US law since before the revolution.
            It literally hasn't. The law wasn't passed till after the Civil War.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you don't know the answer you shouldn't respond.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're the same bunch of pussies

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    national guard is the state army and reserve is the reserve for the national army

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This.

      National Guard belongs to the states and can be deployed domestically by the governers - at any one time a multitude of states have ANG units deployed for a multitude of reasons from law enforcement to just general civil support.

      Army Reserve belongs to the core Federal Army.

      Both units are combat formations - National Guard contains a number of divisions (comprised of units from multiple states), big states have ANG formations comprising entire divisions (like Texas and Cali.). In a time of war they can be deployed like the regular army, although, they dont do the Hispanicy shit as they are not quite up to the standards of the regular army (although they have the same equipment).

      In regards to who actually controls the National Guard, its actually an unresolved constitutional issue with both the Federal Executive and State Executives claiming ownership and control. The White House argues that it has the final say, the States beg to differ. No one has been dumb enough to push the issue in the past, but Biden is an idiot and Oklahomans are a stubborn people so we will shortly see.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This is mostly correct, but the issue of who controls the guard has definitely come up and it's the commander in chief, the President. This was settled in a 1933 defense act and has been upheld by the court.

        When the Supreme Court ordered the desegregation of public schools in Little Rock the governor of Arkansas called out the National Guard to block the students. Eisenhower federalized it, something he has legal power to do, and the Guard instead escorted the students into the school and handled the low level unrest and rioting.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To be fair, the National Guard of several states got a ton of practical experience policing Afghanistan. I'd put them somewhere around the ranks of the marines as a specialist force who in their case are an army of military policemen.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >In regards to who actually controls the National Guard, its actually an unresolved constitutional issue
        Lolno, there's a reason State Guards also exist. Governors know the score.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    National Guard can be called up by state governments and these days mostly provide disaster response. Army reserves are exactly what the name suggests, extra bodies that are available to the Army if needed

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Guard is theoretically subject to the state its in rather than the federal government. In practice, a conflict in this has not actually been tested yet.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Guard can have more domestic duties basically but both count as 'reserve' forces even if only one has reserve in the name.

      It's been tested a bunch of times.

      Feds have the priority since they pay for everything.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    National Guard has more combat units. I think Army Reserves has like 1 Infantry Battalion.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    National Guard is the armed forces of a given state, Reserves are part of the federal armed forces.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Reservist are members of the Military but, as the name implies, they are part of the reserves and can be called upon to become active. They general have to do training and some time as being active but otherwise they are essentially regular members of the Military.

    The national Guard is intended to be the military of the state and under the command of the state governor and are generally responsible for dealing with and managing domestic issues within their state. They can and do get called upon to work with the regular military which is good if you're an officer but their primary responsiblity is state side.

    Frankly I'm of the opinion things like EMTs, Fire fighters, and Police should get rolled into the National Guard

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Frankly I'm of the opinion things like EMTs, Fire fighters, and Police should get rolled into the National Guard
      Firefighter/Paramedic here,
      No thanks. That'd just be a way for them to pay us even less.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Frankly I'm of the opinion things like EMTs, Fire fighters, and Police should get rolled into the National Guard

      The National Guard has all of these things already.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    National Guard is ran by the States. Reserves is ran by the Federal Government. One serves the State level and can be called for Federal duty while one serves the Federal government and can be called for Active duty at any time.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The other anons have pretty much nailed it, but I'd also like to point out the sole reason for the national guard to exist is to get around the Posse Commitatus act of 1878, which precludes the military from enforcing civilian law outside of military installations unless ordered to by the president of the united states. So in other words it's the government finding a loophole in its duly legislated restraints against using the military to pacify civilian dissention.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Although its been said Guard is State whereas the Reserves are Federal. Both deploy overseas at similar rates, but the Guard is more likely to deploy to natural disasters and riots. There is a reserve component to all branches, but only the Army and Airforce have National Guard components. A lot of the time you can get better benefits through the Guard because you get both state and federal benefits. Both reserves and guard have full time members that wear the uniform everyday, along with SOCOM and flying units that are pretty much active duty that just don't PCS.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'll answer this question because everyone ITT is clearly a neverserve or an AD cuck.

    The US Army has three components that compromise the Army of the United States (look it up). The Regular Army is the Active Duty army. They're the first respond to international crisis and work full-time.

    The Army Reserve are the reserve forces of the Regular Army. They're part time soldiers, but that isn't the full picture. The Reserve has almost no combat arms units excpeting one battalion of infantry in Hawaii. Instead the Reserves have all combat support and Combat Service Suport MOS meaning they do a significant portion of the logistics and force sustainment stuff for the Army. This frees up Regular Army to mostly focus on combat units.

    The National Guard is the State Militia, yes. However they are still Army. The National Guard is the Combat reserve of the Regular Army when called up. They have Infantry, Artillery, Armor, and Special Forces, and do in fact make up a significant portion of the combat strength of the Army. This gives the states combat power in case of emergency and helps to augment the force during wartime.

    The National Guard and Reserves are a significant portion of the strength of the Army. About 50% of the entire Army is National Guard and Reserves. In comparison other branches have much smaller reserve components. The Marines for example only have about 30,000 reservists. The Navy has only about 30% reservists. The Army frequently uses both NG and Reserves, and getting called up to Active Duty is just a matter of paperwork.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    National Guard is basically the state militia, not the LARPers you see running around.
    Also to piss off people here, it's what the 2nd amendment was referring too in terms of a 'well regulated militia'

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This kids, is what we call a "bait" post, don't bother interacting with posters of such, they won't argue from a place of good faith, instead arguing with blatant misrepresentation of reality, butthurt, and incorrect understanding of the subject matter

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You`re correct about the pissinf people off part. Retarded gays who are illiterate and wrong frequently piss people off.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    im still trying to figure out if the guard is full time or not
    I keep getting conflicting answers

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It is mostly part time, but when the state or the federal government needs extra units they "activate" everyone and make them full time for a while. There are a handful of permanently activated guardsmen who serve full-time to staff the units for training and administration.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        thx for the info

        We're part-time, but there are plenty of full time positions in the Guard. There's AGR, ADOS, technicians, and regular deployments. And if you're above E5, you're basically always on call for random shit. You don't just show up to drill and go home. There is a lot of planning and work that has to be done throughout the month in preparation for drill and just general unit readiness.

        I'm a Guard Officer Candidate, and I spend about an hour per day answer calls, emails, or preparing documents. It's a part-time job in name only.

        >I'm a Guard Officer Candidate, and I spend about an hour per day answer calls, emails, or preparing documents. It's a part-time job in name only.
        only an hour and you're back to doing other stuff? It's not a scheduled thing is it? Just randomly throughout the day having to do stuff like that?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >only an hour and you're back to doing other stuff?
          Yes, but sometimes it takes multiple hours, sometimes I don't do anything that day. 1 hour is just an average.
          >It's not a scheduled thing is it?
          No, unless it is. We have scheduled training meetings and sometimes you need to schedule a meeting with someone if you're working on a project. You have to consider that you're working around a few dozen people's schedules too. For the most part though I just complete my work at my own pace before a set deadline.
          >Just randomly throughout the day having to do stuff like that?
          Yes. It's an all day thing. We do most stuff in the evening because that's when people aren't at their civilian jobs.

          It's honestly very manageable because right now I only work 25 hours at my civilian job and am single, but if I worked 40+ hours, and had a wife and kids I'd be really stressed out. The Guard has its ups and down, but if you wanna be a full time soldier, go active duty because your free time will at always be free time. The Guard is like a side hobby that controls your life.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      We're part-time, but there are plenty of full time positions in the Guard. There's AGR, ADOS, technicians, and regular deployments. And if you're above E5, you're basically always on call for random shit. You don't just show up to drill and go home. There is a lot of planning and work that has to be done throughout the month in preparation for drill and just general unit readiness.

      I'm a Guard Officer Candidate, and I spend about an hour per day answer calls, emails, or preparing documents. It's a part-time job in name only.

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To make it even more complicated, some US states and also Puerto Rico also have a "State Guard" which reports solely to the state and, unlike the state's National Guard, is not considered also part of the US military and is not available to be called into Federal service.

    They pretty much only do stuff like natural disasters and depending on which state may not receive any combat training.

    You don't hear about these much because they don't do much outside of their own state, and often work alongside the NG so you could just assume they were part of it.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Reserve
    actually get deployed to foreign areas to shore up manpower issues
    >guard
    shoot morons with rubber bullets

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Reserve
      >get deployed to foreign areas to shore up manpower issues
      >guard
      >shoot morons with rubber bullets
      >also get deployed to foreign areas to shore up manpower issues

      Ftfy.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      False retard, my C-130 guard unit regularly deployed to Kuwait

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depending on state, the guard can also be called up to sit in trucks on the Mexican border jerking off and sleep in no-AC tents in the middle of summer with no hardship pay until they kill themselves.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And it won't count towards AD time because of politics.

        Fuck the border states for doing that shit

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The smirk of a "soldier" that never had to carry her own ruck.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >her

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They both don't do anything

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Reserves are army reserve units. National Guard belong to the state, and due to some agreements to standardized training were registered as a component of the army as another type of reserve.
    tl/dr the state/governor owns the national guard, but the army also got parental visitation rights even though they got divorced from the state.

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