No time to explain

...get in the panca/k/e

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sweet Jesus, that's not a boat that's a raft.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      We sail for Ukranya at dawn, men.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Careful, I heard they have torpedo boats.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          *Panics and shoots unsuccessfully at a Norwegian fishing boat*

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          considering recent events at Sevastopol this is fucking gold

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Kamchatka finally made 8.8 jiggaknots
            >still not in time to warn futuretsar putin of dastardly anglo bomb bote plot

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Wait, wasn't this also the Ironclad which also copper sheathed, so when it sails in the salty sea it forms a circuit that corrodes its own hull?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          wobbles like a motherfucker in any sort of waves too

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          that's pretty much any metal, anon galvanic corrosion spares no one

          most metals don't do it as quickly as copper, though - unironically would have probably worked better if they let it oxidize first since copper oxide is protective

          one day i dream of silicon-hulled boats
          corrode through solid rock (SiO2), seawater electrolytic bitches

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Pretty sure anon means that it was iron with a copper sheath resulting in galvanic corrosion occurring at a very fast rate. Basically doing the opposite of what a sacrificial anode does.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >corrode through solid rock
            concrete ships were a thing, and they lasted a really long time. IIRC some of the WW2 concrete ships still exist.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I think the bigger problem by far was that when it fired its guns it spun around at dizzying speeds, throwing the crew about the deck while being entirely combat ineffective since the world around you is now a blur and you're too motion sick to do anything other than vomit anyways.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No they didn't, that's the same sort of nonsense as when people say the Iowas moved sideways when they fired a full broadside from their 16" rifles.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Let's be honest here, is this really such a far-fetched notion when we're talking about something Russians made? 18th century Russians no less?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Look at where the guns are located and the size of them relative to the rest of the ship, there's no way they were causing it to spin out of control when fired. They could rotate on the spot reasonably quickly by using their screws which reportedly caused some discomfort and seasickness which doesn't really surprise me. There's plenty of real things to meme about the Russians and their contraptions without making things up and spreading them as fact

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Fair enough. I swear I heard stories of them rotating on their own (meaning without crew input) at least, generally being unwieldly in combat.

                Conservation of angular momentum anon

                Math and physics are hard, man

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Fair enough. I swear I heard stories of them rotating on their own (meaning without crew input) at least, generally being unwieldly in combat.
                they definitely had trouble staying pointed in the right direction and firing a gun would cause enough movement to make shooting the other annoying. they were pretty stable in calm water iirc, but were easily influenced by waves and stuff

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Conservation of angular momentum anon

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I also am willing to believe fantasies if it fits my propagandist narrative

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >18th century
                19th retard. 18th century is the 1700s

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah that's my bad. I was debating blaming it on a typo to save face since 8 and 9 are right next to each other, but I really just didn't check if I'm being honest.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That sounds fucking hilarious but I need historic citation on that.

            Let's be honest here, is this really such a far-fetched notion when we're talking about something Russians made? 18th century Russians no less?

            Russia wasn't braindead yet in the 1800s, it's in the 1900s where everything would start going completely to shit for them.

            Wait, wasn't this also the Ironclad which also copper sheathed, so when it sails in the salty sea it forms a circuit that corrodes its own hull?

            Why was it copper sheathed?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Why was it copper sheathed?
              The same reason many boats today use copper anti-fouling paint. It keeps off the worst of the barnacles, kelp, etc when you're in the water for a long time.

              Fair enough. I swear I heard stories of them rotating on their own (meaning without crew input) at least, generally being unwieldly in combat.
              [...]
              Math and physics are hard, man

              Not that anon, but I absolutely believe it would rotate somewhat while underway. It has literally zero resistance to rotation in its hullform, so it'd be really hard to keep it on a straight track when steaming along, especially in rough weather.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Despite it's issues (or rather because of them), I do still want one though. I imagine the cir/k/le would be fun to pilot.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                If we put a big enough cannon offset to one side, we can make the PrepHolearousel real.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                We could arrange 4 of them like a swastika shape and fire them off in quick succession to turn our vessel into the world's largest beyblade.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I feel that would work better if we gave it a large pointed bottom and we did it on arctic ice.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That sounds fucking hilarious but I need historic citation on that.

          [...]
          Russia wasn't braindead yet in the 1800s, it's in the 1900s where everything would start going completely to shit for them.

          [...]
          Why was it copper sheathed?

          Copper kills off the barnacles and other pests that would eat the wood. It would rust but Copper Oxide is actually fairly durable so you'd end up with this green layer of patina that would protect the rest of the copper.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Inherently stable design

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not just a raft, a STEAM raft!

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I can't help but imagine it fidget spinning its way across the sea.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my body is ready

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Line the outter edge with cannons
    >Enemy Ship Spotted!
    >Give the ship a good spin
    >Fire each cannon as it comes around on target
    >By the time a rotation is completed, the cannons are reloaded and ready to fire again
    And thus we could have had the largest gatling gun in history.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Offshore naval battery? We're these useful?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No. Well yes. But no. That's not an offshore naval battery but offshore naval batteries did exist and were very useful.

      Fort Drum in the Phillipines, for example, was basically a small warship made on concrete and built on this tiny stub of an island. During WW2 the Japanese failed to even kill a single soldier manning the fort with bombardments while the fort was a massive pain in the ass to work around. Eventually, the US soldiers gave up when the rest of the garrison surrendered.

      The Japanese then held the island for ~3 years until the US army cleared the roof, poured gas down the air vents, and set the entire thing on fire. The soldiers couldn't get into the fort for 5 days.

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