military power tools

This is a serious question. What types of power tools does the US military use? Are they standardized? Do they use a single battery pack spec? Do humvees, hemtts and tanks even have 12v plugs to charge them? Do they just use an auxiliary air compressor/the brake air compressor for air tools instead?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I cant speak for ground vehicles but as an Aircraft mechanic we can order tools according to NATO Stock Number (NSN) from our supply system. If our technical orders say so than we can manufacture or procure our own equipment locally provided it meets the saftey requirements in our technical data and we get the approval to spend our unit's money.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      they dont contract out specific military versions of civilian tools then give them a designation like "Mk 1 power drill" or "Model 2022 Jackhammer"

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was in a normal unit and we mostly had 20V Dewalts.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Power tools aren't really standardized, but a unit does keep track of them with hand receipts in the company property book. If they got lost or damaged, you can basically just buy more since they aren't considered major end items.

    t. National Guard Officer Candidate who passed, but vaguely remembers the classes of supply exam

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ausfag here so I can't speak for burgers but tooling is purchased out of unit funds from an approved supplier catalogue. Once purchased it will be placed on the tool store register (a unit section that has like 3 people who are responsible for managing tooling). As for brands storage cases are basically all pelican who also supplies most of our torches, hand tools are a mix of snap on and and henchman. Powertools tend to be the preference of who ever placed the order but Milwaukee tends to be the most popular followed by DeWalt and Makita.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >up angle into metal
    >flimsy ass stance on the ladder
    gay is going to snap that bit

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Are they standardized? Do they use a single battery pack spec? Do humvees, hemtts and tanks even have 12v plugs to charge them? Do they just use an auxiliary air compressor/the brake air compressor for air tools instead?
    doubt it

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Motor-Tfag here, our maintenance guys order their own tools off GSA Advantage, the main website used for US government purchases. You can get literally anything on there- to include big black 12 inch dildoes- so the brand usually depends on the purchaser's taste. Lot of DeWalt and Milwaukee, but I've also seen Makita and even Bosch for some reason

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        yeah if the gvmt were paying for my power tools I'd buy whatever Project Farm recommends, too

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They seem pretty set on stihl chainsaws.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        im surprised they havnet requested development for quieter or silenced chainsaws

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's because Stihl is the best/most reliable

        im surprised they havnet requested development for quieter or silenced chainsaws

        Yeah, you'd think for how rare it is that they'd use them they would go for a small/lighter powerhead like a Stihl 201 instead of the 360 or 460 series (or previous version equivalents) that they seem to have there. Shit, even a small battery powered one will do just fine against a shitty door or wall.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's a speed-of-cut thing, the same reason firefighters most frequently use 72cc+ saws like the 460/461/462. The displacement is necessary to keep the chain speed up when they're "misusing" the saw. Put a carbide chain on it and you'll rapidly cut through anything short of foot-thick masonry at the cost of a ruined chain and maybe bar damage + drive system wear. For masonry there's actually the 462 Rock Boss but the times you'd need that vs a breaching charge seems exceptionally rare.
          Smaller electric saws may be an answer in the future thanks to the constant torque output. There's 40cc equivalents available now, a 55-62cc equivalent might have the necessary power in a better package. We've already had one fire station evaluate the battery cut-off saws with similar impressions.
          t. Stihl mechanic/dealer

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah I get that, kinda like when we throw a small bar on our 880 at the shop, that shit hits some mean rpms. Just seems like the use case is so rare and limited that it almost defeats the purpose of having the tool in the first place, better to have it on hand and not need it than need it and not have it though. Our company seems to wants switch to battery saws but we seem to be holding out.
            t. arborist/professional Stihl user

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >company wants to switch to battery tools
              That's where the industry is going, so much regulatory and social pressure to change has all the manufacturers' R&D going into battery and electronic platforms. Clearest sign of the end of an era for gas power equipment, Honda discontinued production of their lawnmowers and California-compliant generators for 2023.

              The battery stuff is handy but there's definite flaws still, especially for professional users who aren't impressed by the ease of starting and simplified "fuel" requirements the way homeowners are. Durability and reliability is the biggest one, they can't be treated the way owners/operators expect of gas equipment. The battery tools fail without warning instead of running rough, blink lights expecting people to have read and remember the owner's manual to decipher what it means, and are hard to fix even for a dealer. Purchase costs being 2-3 times higher doesn't help.
              I hate the Husqvarna consumer line in particular because they're otherwise good premium tools that might as well be disposable if it breaks out of warranty. Stihl at least provides detailed electrical schematics for the technicians and stocks an adequate selection of replacement parts at sensible prices. Was amazed to fix an 11 year old MSE 250 months back, the faulty switch module was still available like you'd expect of gas parts.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                trying to picture an electricly powered tamper or jumping jack, I just know california is gonna fuck the market to where that’s my life in ten to fifteen years

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Massive battery bricks like this, plus shock absorbers/isolation to protect the electronics on high-vibration tools. Husqvarna Construction has something like the MX line debuting soon and I know Briggs & Stratton has a line of giant power pack systems they're marketing to other companies as small engine replacements. Doesn't seem practical but there won't be much choice for new equipment or Euros/fed contractors facing regulatory requirements.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                https://i.imgur.com/rmQTYgJ.jpg

                Massive battery bricks like this, plus shock absorbers/isolation to protect the electronics on high-vibration tools. Husqvarna Construction has something like the MX line debuting soon and I know Briggs & Stratton has a line of giant power pack systems they're marketing to other companies as small engine replacements. Doesn't seem practical but there won't be much choice for new equipment or Euros/fed contractors facing regulatory requirements.

                I don't think power will be a problem, current electric power tools are already beating normal corded equivalents. But the big problem that I see, which nobody appears to be addressing, is *charging time*.
                Let's say we're talking about a landscaper who currently runs a 30 hp ZTR for 8 hours a day. 30hp = 22.371kw = 179,000 watt-hours of power. Now he gets home and needs to recharge that battery before heading out to work the next morning.
                Now here's the problem. A normal wall outlet of 120V 15 amps can only provide 1800 watts....which would take 100 hours to charge the battery.
                Just like EV charging stations, special fast-chargers are required in order to effectively use high power cordless tools. And those chargers can't just plug into a wall, they would require a whole new, large, circuit to be installed by an electrician, and I bet that many houses simply don't have the excess capacity to install that.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Power density and overheating are still a huge problem for large battery tools, it's why fuel-injected saws like the MS500i are a thing now. Batteries still can't replace the landowner and professional tool lines but rather supplement them, replacing tools like pole saws where the ability to eliminate the 10ft+ powershaft is a massive improvement, or t-handles power is adequate and push-button starting is superior for harness work. Either way though, the equipment is getting more complicated and expensive on a short development cycle, which is contributing to the reliability problems I observe.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Agreed, but it's scary how fast things are advancing. Cordless tools have been around for decades but while they were a joke in the 90's, today's cordless circular saws, drills, and grinders spank the standard corded models. And they are rapidly making progress for OPE. Right now it's only the smaller stuff that is competitive with gas but that's only a matter of time. I bought a DCCS623 a couple weeks ago. It cannot compete with my ported MS150 but it certainly impressed me, especially when you consider it was a tiny fraction of the price of the Stihl. I don't think I'm going to be giving up my 460 anytime soon, but the specs of some of the better electrics are getting pretty close, the 20" Flexvolt Dewalt is widely reported as being a monster with ~4 hp. But, it takes ages to charge the batteries while my gas saw is back up and running in 30 seconds with a gas can.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Cordless tools have been around for decades but while they were a joke in the 90's, today's cordless circular saws, drills, and grinders spank the standard corded models
                Hell my old man got a Dewalt cordless chainsaw and that thing kicks ass, no more dealing with 2 stroke bullshit and it takes the same batteries as the drill, sign me the fuck up.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, that's what I'm saying. They might not have practical equivalents for the really big saws like a 660 or an 880 but for normal stuff like cutting up firewood, tree trimming, storm cleanup, timber aka "log cabin" construction, they kick ass. It's only at the most demanding levels that electric chainsaws are behind gas--either really big saws, or a pro logger cutting all day in the middle of nowhere where it's not practical to charge batteries fast enough to keep up with the saw. Give it a few years and even that role might be challenged.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >they would require a whole new, large, circuit to be installed by an electrician, and I bet that many houses simply don't have the excess capacity to install that
                It's really easy to add this and most houses do, in fact, have enough space for one more double-pole breaker. It's no different from adding a water heater or an AC compressor

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                It's not just physical space in the panel, it's the load on the circuit. OFC it's easy to snap a breaker in the box, but do they have enough extra capacity on their main breaker for it.

                >It's no different from adding a water heater or an AC compressor
                Yeah. And many homes don't have the capacity for that. Try asking how I know. And really, you need a pretty f'n big circuit. 240V 50A would be barely adequate to charge the hypothetical contractor's mower battery in 12 hours so you need something bigger than that. And let's not forget a landscaper is probably charging a lot more than just one ZTR...there's probably a couple big mowers, several trimmers, an edger, a smaller mower, etc. on the truck as well.

                The power woes are real, it's why modern homes are being built with 300 or 500 amp service to account for 30/50 amp outlets for more than just the stove and dryer. Demand for those high wattage delivery circuits exceeds supply, where I live commercial electrical panels are on an 18 month backorder at the local distributor.

                Absolutely, a modern home built with that kind of thing in mind has a big enough service. But some crapshack built in the 70's does not.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                The power woes are real, it's why modern homes are being built with 300 or 500 amp service to account for 30/50 amp outlets for more than just the stove and dryer. Demand for those high wattage delivery circuits exceeds supply, where I live commercial electrical panels are on an 18 month backorder at the local distributor.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Melee Loadout

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    what about the $400 dollar hammer, or $10,000 toilet seat? The military spends insane amounts of money for basic tools and there is no assurance anything that is bought is any good because of the corrupt and incompetent contracting.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I heard your son punched the president

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I heard your son punched the president

      Underrated Independence Day references

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What types of power tools does the US military use?
    Based on how the military operates in the current year, they probably subcontract from companies that are the most progressive with rainbow flags and pink tools.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nasa uses Makita.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    loose lips sinks ships
    >fuck you chang

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Anon... Come On, Really!
      >Do humvees, hemtts and tanks do 12volt?
      OP, Anon The above vehicles have a 2000 volt DC system at 850 amps and can recharge
      off 800,000 KV 1.2 Mega Amp high tension power lines or Magnetically charge off of Space-X rockets in orbit.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    wheeled vehicle mechanic here in the army, we use dewalt at my unit

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