Metal cans bad for burning?

Metal cans bad for burning? (Having stuff inside the metal can burn)

I heard that food cans have a plastic coating to prevent bacterial and fungal infections as well as prevent spoilage of food
Heard it contains BPA and thus you shouldn't food in it
If I burn anything in it it would release all the BPA

How do I know if it has a plastic container and if any chemical like xenestrogens exist in it, and if so how can I remove the coating before burning

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The coating is to prevent the can contents from interacting with the metal and corroding it or whatever. I think they stopped using BPA for it years ago though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The coating is to prevent the can contents from interacting with the metal and corroding it or whatever. I think they stopped using BPA for it years ago though.

      How can I remove it without turning gay

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >How can I remove it without turning gay

        umm, anon...

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >How can I remove it without turning gay

          You know what I mean
          How can I remove it without being exposed to any harmful chemicals (I'm going to re-use the can multiple times for burning too and storing it so burning it once and being away from the smoke isn't an option)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            why not just get a metal container that is designed to have things cooked in it?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              No I need to use this cans, this is do it yourself not paypig cuck yourself

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                you tell 'em buster. don't take any shit off of that buygay trying to shill his "food" cans

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Maybe I should

              Anyways would still be helpful if someone gave advice for either removing the plastic and/or checking if it's harmful

              No I need to use this cans, this is do it yourself not paypig cuck yourself

              >No I need to use this cans, this is do it yourself not paypig cuck yourself

              Frick you you are not OP I am OP
              I dont need to use a can for this but Id like to

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                1. it's "harmful" if you grow breasts. ymmv as to if find this harmful
                2. what the frick do you mean "use the cans for burning" are you ESL?
                3. assuming you're using them to cook, BPAs melt at 316F, water boils at 212F. unless you're frying chicken in oil (400F) as long as there is food in the can it won't melt the lining.
                4. if you're not using them to cook food or boil water in the can, what the frick do you care?
                5. if you are a moron (highly likely) and are *still* scared of melting/leaching then put them in the fire or put fire in them or put them on the stove, whatever the frick you meant ONCE and it will melt/burn anything volatile away and you can rest easy knowing ywnbaw
                6. you're clearly a homosexual

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >get a metal container that is designed to have things cooked in it
              We could call it a 'pot'. Yeah. That's the ticket.
              Quick! Off to the patent office.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You know what I mean
            >How can I remove it without being exposed to any harmful chemicals (I'm going to re-use the can multiple times for burning too and storing it so burning it once and being away from the smoke isn't an option)
            What he was alluding to is the fact that it's too late, you're already a raging homosexual.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Same method as removing teflon from cookware.
            Be sure to save it for the next thread where the guy wants the can plastic added back to his

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              How do you remove teflon from cookware?

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You use cast iron or stainless instead.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I think the fricking monsantos and 3Ms have made it difficult to find cast iron or stainless steel frying pans. It's all aluminum coated with teflon.
                But yeah, cast iron or stainless ftw

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >It's all aluminum coated with teflon

                About 5 years ago PrepHole told me ceramic coated pans won't last; my guess is that they turn the heat up to red hot or something because I got one and have used it daily for years and it's still brand new, and as easy to clean as any pan I've ever used. Far out lasts teflon in my opinion. As to the cast iron vs. stainless vs. aluminum-ceramic I don't have an opinion as I cook simple easy things that are not demanding.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I forgot about those, although I have one. kek.
                I season mine with oil.

                The thing is with what you pay for a stainless steel frying pan, you can buy two or three teflon ones.
                And at the supermarket it's not so easy to find stainless steel frying pans.

                I don't remember how much my ceramic pan cost.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You have it backwards. If you do gay acts, it will come off by itself.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >stopped using BPA
      They did not. Most cans use BPA based lining.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >How do I know if it has a plastic container and if any chemical like xenestrogens exist in it

      soak a test can in acid that only consumes metal but not plastic.

      if the label says 'bpa free' it just means they used some other bp.... like bpb.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They replaced it with an analog that was just as bad. Apparently the leaching is really only noticeable in acidic foods.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ironically, your best bet is to burn it out.
    That is, before you use it for whatever you're planning, do an initial burn (ideally a bit hotter than you expect it to get during use) in a well-ventilated area. This will remove any volatile compounds you need to worry about, assuming you're not cooking over it or huffing the smoke.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Put it in a fire and burn away the chemicals. They're organic chemicals that definitely burn at fireplace temperatures. The can will begin rusting immediately though, but you can dip it in pine tar after you take it out of the fireplace, and thay should be a costing that at least for a while prevents rust

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Easiest method is just to burn it away then use some baking soda, vinegar, and lemon juice to scrub away everything with some copper wire(prevents the can from scraping.
    This will clean it and then after a quick soap and water to remove any residue it'll be ready for food-grade use!

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nobody is that stupid. OP is obviously trolling.

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