Looking to get into school to gain a degree in CS but figured that until I have enough money saved up to enter school, I can do the learning (via text...

Looking to get into school to gain a degree in CS but figured that until I have enough money saved up to enter school, I can do the learning (via textbooks) now to prep me for later, so I am wondering;
>1.) Any CS Major or Graduate, what or how would you modify this map?
>2.) Most importantly, I am seeking good college text books that covers these blocks of learning

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There’s no way you should be starting theory of computing in 4 year, that’s insane.
    Your “calculus” classes should be discrete, not continuous. In fact, *everyone* should first tackle discrete calculus before continuous so they can understand (the pain) a bit better.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Oh, and “intro to programming” shouldn’t be a thing. Programming itself is just a side thing you just do, like a lab where you make trinitrotoluine in chem. CS is about math, not “coding”
      It’s like teaching you “how to hold a pen” class for an English major—it doesn’t exist.
      CS, conceptually, has a long way to go.
      But, not as far as CE—things can always get worse!

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    bumping for someone who reads my OP and not skim it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Obviously, Knuth’s “discrete mathematics” is a book you should own.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry, it’s “concrete mathematics”
        Discrete is what it’s about.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Thank you for the correction Anon, I appreciate that!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >he isn't aware that college is designed to hold students back and stretch their learning out over redundant classes, recycled concepts and holding stations. college is not designed to teach it's designed to milk you for four+ years of tuition and then give you a degree LITERALLY WITHOUT REGARD for if you know the content (meaning you can copy the homework for every course, fail every test and still get a degree).

      You want to learn?
      1. Pick a language, preferably something that you know something you want to do can be done in.
      2. Go to the bookstore (or library) and buy the O'Riellys book on that language. O'Riellys is a publisher that traditionally has an animal drawn in black and white on each cover.
      3. Sit down and read the fricking book. Read it from page 1 until there is some concept or trick or application that you absolutely have to try for yourself. If this isn't past 3/4 of the book, if you didn't read every page, if you didn't understand everything then you fail.
      4. Implement that thing
      5. put the book on the shelf for future reference
      6. Continue implementing in the language until you get bored.
      7. Start with another language.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        forgot the image

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          no need to post it, I found a list of books but thanks for wasting your time to troll.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            > my parents forgot to frick in a sense of humor

            I see.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The sad thing is that all of PrepHole has figured out that PrepHole is the only place you can have an intelligent discussion, no matter HOW FRICKING FAR OFF TOPIC IT CAN BE, so all the children and other assorted morons will follow you here.

    THANKS!

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > “cyber security”
    Roflmao… is this about hiring the black guy from the teen titans to be a bouncer at your country bar?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    if you know what school u wanna enroll in scope out the profs and their chosen books, find the pdfs and their student solutions manual. many just post online. harvard has all their cs stuff online.
    if i were you id consider looking at ce stuff as well for fun. cs is dogshit vs ce but youd be hitting math levels like diff eqs. also ffs algebra comes BEFORE calc in all cases.
    as for languages i would start as low level as you can get and move up from there. c, asm (like s12, pics or atmel not x86) , then c++, python, js, etc. the path of progression really depends on what you want to do, because learning a language means jack shit if you dont practice it. as for concept classes data structures and algorithms comes after basic c (when i did it we wrote c++ classes to handle numbers with inf digits and so on, known as cs201) then move onto more advanced stuff. operating systems, architecture etc comes around the same year as data structures and algos. Operating System Concepts: Silberschatz, Abraham, Galvin, Peter B., Gagne, Greg was my fav os book.

    use the tips above to study other institution progression patterns in order to get your chart straight. warning some course names can be ambiguous between schools.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you Anon

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://ocw.mit.edu/collections/introductory-programming/

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I really appreciate it anon, thank you.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    sharing an update to my OP, just in case anyone else is interested in the same thing.
    I have not been able to verify or compare these titles to see if they are the best to use for these subjects, but this is a start.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Good calc book choice. Add differential equations and optimization methods to your list of math topics for after calc 2.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      > python
      We’re done here. There’s no hope for the future.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      is whatever you wrote down for compilers the dragon book? quick lesson, no one in cs calls any book by its actual name. Next thing you're gonna need is the wizard book and k&r

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    algebra -> precalc -> calc

    most unis push alg/precalc first year if u cant pass entrance requirements. now that math is racist im not surprised seeing this confused shit.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This is a pretty good resource if you want to chip away at CS:
    https://teachyourselfcs.com/

    If your plan is to work in industry, I would honestly recommend majoring in a different technical subject like engineering or a natural science, (applied mathematics, physics, chemistry, earth science, etc.) or really anything that interests you, and minoring in CS.

    Having a broad education and the ability to see problems from different perspectives will set you apart because, quite frankly, pure CS majors are a dime a dozen nowadays. Most CS degrees also fall into this paradox (which some engineering degrees sort of fall into as well, but that's another matter) where you don't really have an in-depth understanding of the mathematical theory, but at the same time your education is too theory-based to be useful.

    Also: soft skills. Skills such as effective communication, time management, and the ability to work as a part of a group are extremely important, and too few recent graduates possess them. One of the best programmers I've ever worked with was a philosophy and math double major: he had the rigorous math background to be able to teach himself CS and pick up new technical concepts on the fly, as well as the ability to clearly define problems and communicate his solutions/work.

    Good luck with your studies. It's an interesting field and there are lots of opportunities to get involved in some really cool work.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The entire cs50 class from harvard is available for free on youtube, and you can do the assignments and have then graded (by a bot) for free, and have the option to pay for saying you completed the course

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's a site called teachyourselfcs

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why did you choose the one board with the least CS majors in it? try

    [...]

    or

    [...]

    also the whole point of going to school is to learn the theory, if you want a job or are interested in coding learn how to code

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Honestly OP the industry is fricked so proceed with caution. Even if you know your shit it's hard to get your foot in the door with employers. I know several guys who have obtained their degrees, and they're currently applying to hundreds of positions with no reply. If you go into any career thread on PrepHole only 10% of the posts will be about actively working people, the rest are venting about job applications.
      I've seen the progression of desperation throughout my college years and when I was a senior, there were mobs of people in line for a chance to speak to recruiters at job fairs. I suppose it IS still possible because I did manage to get a job, but you really gotta spend a lot of time working on job interview shit. It is probably just as essential as knowing how to code nowadays.
      Sorry, I don't have any advice to avoid this. There are forces at work destroying the middle class. Do your research before committing to this path.

      >also the whole point of going to school is to learn the theory
      This is untrue just because of the state of the industry. Having a CS degree is as essential as having a pulse. You could maybe get away with no degree if your dad is the owner of the company.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >This melinated gentleman asking for academia advise on a tujikistani moat building forum
    Here you go my autistic child:
    https://PrepHole-science.fandom.com/wiki/Computer_Science_and_Engineering
    https://PrepHole-science.fandom.com/wiki/Programming_Textbook_Recommendations

    Many schools have their courses for free online.
    >verification not required

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      god

      DAMN

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Looking to get into school to gain a degree in CS but figured that until I have enough money saved up to enter school, I can do the learning (via textbooks) now to prep me for later, so I am wondering;
    >>1.) Any CS Major or Graduate, what or how would you modify this map?
    I studied comp sci and also medicine.

    I see a chart like this and I think to myself "wow this is a notably organized person wanting to go into a legendarily disorganized field" -- you sure you don't want to do medicine or get a Phd in some science? Ignoring the academics seems like it would suit your personality better.

    You seem a super organized person and computer science nerds, we're a very very disorganized folk. Your competition in these classes aren't planning every next step, they're probably not even planning the next week or even day, but what they love to do is sit in the basement and code all day. Your competition is probably coding right now, not to out-compete you, not to be the best, they just love writing assembly games for the Atari 2600 as a hobby, and that level of joy and intensity inadvertently makes them the best.

    Or, go into a field where your immense organization skills, themselves, make you the best.

    Food for thought, do as you will.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Planning this much? You're doing it wrong. Reading books? You're doing it wrong. CS comes exclusively from drive and hobbyism. You should be coding things that you find cool right now. Doing bullshit planning is a waste of time. If you aren't already coding you should find another career path, one study intensive. CS favors natural aptitude.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If you aren't already coding you should find another career path, one study intensive. CS favors natural aptitude.

      This because you would be competing against people for whom (at least early on) coding is a joy and a hobby. The purpose of work is sufficient money to RETIRE and there are still many ways to do that but not by following the herd off a cliff.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why do you want to study computer science? you don't seem to like math much considering you are spending your entire first year without a real university-level math course and you don't even do linear algebra until 3rd year, which tells me you have 0 intention of taking a real math course at any point. just study electrical engineering or do a diploma in programming at community college. im afraid you may be falling prey to a decades=spanning marketing campaign

  17. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Recent software engineer grad; I don't understand the point of learning this before you enroll.

    Unless you have a specific niche interest in low level programming for example you wouldn't need to actually learn all this before hand. Don't get me wrong it is useful, and I feel that my courses on most of these subjects were useful however not nearly as much as actually programming.

    What you'll start to realize as you start actually working on projects is that very rarely will you actually implement many of the things your learning about. you'll almost always have some sort of abstraction which is what you will really use in applications as opposed to the barebones implementations. In my opinion youll learn best from just trying challenging projects and finding the best solution (including the stack) and make sure you understand why it's being done that way. Skills aside, this will help you build a knowledge base of different languages/frameworks which will be used in your job or other projects. You'll pick up most of the theory along the way. I also find it's much easier to grasp the theoretical concepts if you can relate it to real applications of the theory being applied.

    Learning platforms is also important. I would switch to Linux as your daily OS and learn about how it actually works through trying different things. Cloud is also important as aside from embedded code, things are moving towards micro service based cloud applications. Learning to work with things like AWS is going to be really useful for finding a job or even working freelance as it simplifies things if leveraged properly

    > Inb4 didn't answer question
    That being said to answer your question, the program map does look good and follows relatively closely to what I was doing. Math is normally easier if you really do it sequentially (without big year gaps) so would suggest that.

  18. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do not waste your time taking pre-calc. If you're decently intelligent you can pass calc 1 and 2 with just basic algebra knowledge going into them. I know because I did it and it wasn't that bad. If you know you're not smart enough to do that I'd give up now because it only gets worse from there.

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