I've never used one of these. Are they really that useful? Are they a real game changer?

I've never used one of these
Are they really that useful? Are they a real game changer?

I see everyone using these but dunno... never felt the need

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    To me walking sticks are multitools. For example, it can be used as a sling staff to hurl rocks with much greater strength than a simple hand sling. You can also screw a 1/4-20 hanger bolt into the top to turn it into a handy camera monopod.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    On flat ground? Eh, some people like them. I don't find they make that much of a difference.
    On steep slopes and uneven or icy ground? Yeah, they're the fricking shit. Uphill or downhill, they're great.

    They're not essential by any stretch but if you're planning a long hike (say a week of 6+ hour days) then I'd suggest giving them a try.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I live where it is flat and only hike trails
      I've been hiking all my life and have walked longer and further with more weight than you ever will.
      Poles aren't much use on flatland--in every other situation they significantly improve mobility and increase efficiency.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Agreed. I was always dead set against them. After climbing down snow covered cliff faces, falling on 55 degree slopes packing elk out, i started carrying them in the steep stuff. I still see absolutely no need on flat country though

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty much this. Going uphill is a "game changer", if you're fat, you'll still get tired, but if you are fit, you will see an improvement in stamina. Going downhill you will go a bit slower but you knees and ankles will suffer less. Since I have no joint problems I dont use them downhill, but I always carry them uphill.

      Also, they have save me once from a big storm. Had to put a tarp where there were no trees and I used them to set it up, didnt get wet that night

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >They slow you down on the downhill
        you're fricking high
        I'm easily 2x faster using poles on the downhill. It's like downhill skiing with more steps... way way faster.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty handy. I always carry at least one
    >move branches, bushes, cobwebs out of the way
    >use to check for snakes when I’m in the bush
    >pitch my tent
    >good for extra leverage going up and down bad terrain
    >swing it around for fun like a stick

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      One is the way to go, all the functionality none of the homosexualry

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Only legitimate argument for them. Usually I see them being used by upper middle class midwits walking simple shit.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    These are known as b***h sticks.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      did posting this make you feel cool? homosexual

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Pity him, his schizotypal mental health issues have made him both an /in/cell, and incapable of experiencing positive emotions.
        There is also a high chance he gets very upset over random rock piles, will probably be trying to have his own genitals cut off soon, and will likely not live long after.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, I do feel pretty cool that I can walk like a normal human being without the aid of b***h sticks.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          im proud of you for finally getting out of your mom's basement and being able to walk a couple laps around the mailbox but some of us actually hike on this board.

          I just use a tree branch that I cut and carved 30 years ago instead of spending hundreds of dollars on hollow chinese pot metal poles that bend if I put any amount of force on them.

          imagine if that thing could talk. thanks for the visualization anon

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Some of you don't hike, as evidenced by your larp.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >I'm not the LARPer!!11 You are!!111
              we know you don't go outside son.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        kek, found the b***h

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Cringe. Girls don't make eye contact with you do they?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ask me how I know you aren't white.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        White here, I also call them b***h sticks

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >t. Black person

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The people using them on regular walking trails are usually old or tourists, but they actually make a big difference on steep mountain trails

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I like having something to do with my hands and they're good for stability on uneven terrain, great for uphill. Have done with and without and will pretty much always bring them.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why do you even make these threads man? Why waste your life that way?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yet here you are posting.
      Interesting.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They genuinely help distribute the load but can feel unweildly sometimes. When they become useful is when your personal fitness level and/or the type of hiking you're doing makes it easier to use them than to not. Idk how to explain it better than that, it's all circumstantial and you'll only know when you try them.
    Personally I've only ever relied on them to do some steep winter hikes in deep snow. Otherwise they're more of a hassle and limit my natural gait more than they help.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I just use a tree branch that I cut and carved 30 years ago instead of spending hundreds of dollars on hollow chinese pot metal poles that bend if I put any amount of force on them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Imagine being in your 40s (or even late 30s t b h) and still posting on PrepHole. Grim.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous
        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No one under 35 will get this.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm 35, have children, have a wife, and I still post here, don't forget, you're here forever.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Solid trips
          Getting to 29 in July, been there for 11 years at this point, marrying next year hopefully making a kid next, digits and OP gets an PrepHole gf
          Also trekking poles are based on long hikes, esp with large packs

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You are moronic, age cooms fast.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        moron
        The average age of a gamer in 2010 was 30. You know shit about shit if you think you children who dominate Reddit represent the rest of the Internet population.
        4cgan went live in 2003 and you were probably still in diapers while I was shit posting here.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're the amerimutt filter
    Americans hike on trails that are basically roads for other countries. When they don't, it's to go in either desertic or densely forested areas, two environments where poles are useless
    They never need poles because they don't have the trails that require them. Poles are amazing in rocky or muddy trails that are steep. The whole thing is to use the lanyards to move your weight around like it's a crutch (when going down) or to pull yourself up using your arms and back instead of having to take weird steps. They really help if you're carrying a larger pack, because they spread out the weight and let you always have 3 points on the ground which is great for balance
    Basically they're useless if your hike is even ground, which leads to contempt from amerimutts who only do half day hikes on the nearest instagrammable trail they find

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Americans hike on trails that are basically roads for other countries
      So in other words, you've never hiked in the rugged mountains of the Northeast US and spent your time on tourist paths in the national parks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Eurogay requires a crutch to walk around.
      "HA Ha , Mutts don't need crutches like I do."

      every time

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      are you an actual person? i fell for the bait right?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Enables a tripod arrangement for maximum stability
    >Allows arms to take part in propulsion and ascent
    >Lets you distribute your load a bit better, an unwieldy load may be more annoying to position over your center of gravity
    >Can be used to keep yourself steady or even catch yourself on uneven or insecure terrain without needing to take a tumble or risking your wrist or shoulder as a means of catching and steadying yourself
    >Gives you some better proprioception because your sticks are constantly engaging with the ground around you, so you've got a lot more information available for your reflexes to work off of
    >You can use them to test the stability of your next foothold
    >You can rest on them for a bit if needed
    >Even when not walking, you've got an adjustable length stick for something like pitching a tarp
    Sure it's less useful on a standard dry path, but it gets significantly more useful in more adverse conditions and is almost indispensable in the winter when hauling or moving through deeper snow. There is some argument to be made for a longer single stick, since two sticks just require a constant back-and-forth shifting and rebalancing, but that's mostly personal preference.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're mostly useful if you're frail, old or fat.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i use them so I can zone out while stoned. You can walk pretty relaxed on some pretty uneven terrain without much thought.
    some guy in the army told me soldiers get 20% more ruck 'efficiency' while using them...no idea if its true...but the army studies everything.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I shit you not, I was at the gym today and saw a fat boomer setting up a pair so he could walk around the indoor track. I despise the "silver sneakers" program

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Never used that sort of pole myself, but I've seen plenty of broken ones along the trail, so I doubt they're that good.
    On a purely physical level, unlike some people claim, poles do not reduce the strain on your knees or back on flat ground. I'm too lazy to google for the studies right now, but it's been proven a few times with different measurement methodologies.
    Where poles are great is rough terrain, where you can use them to aid with balancing yourself (especially with a heavy pack). But for that, a longer pole where you can slide your hand up or down to match the slope is much more useful. For comparison, the one I'm using in the hills I'm living in (up to 150% incline, but mostly around 100%) is 2,1m long, and there have been times where I could have used an even longer pole.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Unless you are using them for skiing there is no reason to ever buy a non-extendable pole and lots of reason's not to.

      It isn't uncommon where I'm at for a trail to gain over 1000 feet in elevation in a mile or less. I short the poles uphill and make them very long downhill. Two point adjusters are usually better than single point especially if you hike very steep terrain.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Speaking of which, can you guys recommend me a good brand of trekking poles? Preferably foldable or extendable ones. Thanks!

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why do 95% of AT thruhikers use them? It can’t be because they’re weak, considering they hike ~15 miles a day for months on end. It’s not because of their shelter type, as the same source shows free standing shelters are by far the most common. It’s not a physical disability; most are in their early 20’s. It’s not “hurr they dumb, I’m smart”; figuring out what works and what doesn’t is extremely common, with people swapping out gear pretty often. They’re literally never off trail.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Does that number of people using sticks include the 75% of hikers who drop out?
      >literuhhly
      Oh, nevermind, I didn't know you were moronic. My bad.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do you think there’s a connection between their use of trekking poles and them dropping out?

        Use your words.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No, I think that saying 95% of people using the sticks doesn't really matter when 75% of the same group quit. Would you like me to draw you a chart? You can follow along with your crayons if you promise not to eat any of them.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If this is what you think then why did you phrase it as a question? Why not just say it? This is some woman shit.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Regardless, only 4% chose not to use trekking poles. You can’t only apply 75% of people dropping out to just those that used trekking poles because there isn’t any data that suggests that (as in, who’s to say that 100% of people that chose not to use trekking poles didn’t drop out?) in the end, the chart would stay the same regardless if a significant number of people dropped out or not unless you can prove that 100% of the 4% that didn’t use trekking poles made it the whole way through—and even then, the people that chose not to use trekking poles would still be a major minority

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >I think that saying 95% of people using the sticks doesn't really matter when 75% of the same group quit.

            I don’t follow. Why doesn’t it matter?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              because he's completely mentally moronic and having an unfounded autistic meltdown over people using trekking poles for their intended purpose

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Even more telling us the average distance hiked. I read somewhere (probably The Trek) that it’s over 1,400 miles including successful thruhikes. Im not sure how to do the math in this.

              25% are successful: 2,170 miles
              25% drop out very soon: 30 miles
              100% total average: 1,400 miles

              What’s the average of the remaining 50% who make I more than 30 miles but less than 2,170?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >you should definitely consoom this product here because I also consoomed it
              >I only went PrepHole one time, and I went home early, but consoom it anyway

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You didn’t answer the question, and just made assumptions.

                >consoom meme
                No one recommended a brand or even a type. No on linked to REI.
                >do it because I do it
                No, do it because people who are more experienced than you do it. We learn from others.
                >one time
                I’ve been backpacking since my parents first took me when I was 3 months old, but I don’t think you’re referring to me specifically. Most people who drop out of an AT hike have more experience than you. You’re just some moronic child who should feel bad.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                you have to be 18 to post here

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      All this tells me is 95% of "muh throooo hikers" are pants-on-head morons who refuse to pick up a stick off the ground

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >3,000 people walking down the same trail
        >they can all find perfectly good walking sticks
        Bro, that’s rare even on my seldom used local trails.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Ah yes, because a stick will instantly disintegrate if you take it home with you to use later, thanks to nature's anti-theft system

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >use a stick
        What’s the advantage? Is it just a matter of being really, really poor?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The advantage is you didn't spend money on something you could get for free
          >oh look, a stream
          >not gonna get water from it though; I'd rather buy water
          A fool and his money are easily parted.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A stick is not a trekking pole.
            I would explain why but you're obviously moronic and your parents didn't give you enough attention.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >doesn't know how to use a stick
              >calls others moronic
              Okay

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >non-collapsible
            >no cork or even rubber handle
            >not adjustable
            >no snow baskets

            I seriously don’t see any advantage. Trekking poles aren’t expensive. “Didn’t spend money” is fricking stupid, unless you are exceedingly poor.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >I must consooom because someone told me I had to have these features in a stick
              I have a bottle of water I can sell you, anon. 100 USD and it can be yours.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Damn, you just can’t let go of this meme. No one told me I needed those things. I figured it out on my own. Why haven’t you figured it out yet?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                if you are too poor to spend 10 dollar on a hiking pole that beats a stick in all metrics, it might be you that is the fool

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >if you choose to not spend money on something you don't need it means you're poor
                I bet the marketing team at REI loves you

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Nah. He’s right, you’re wrong.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                technically there's very little you *need* to go on a thru-hike at all, but all the extra odds and ends make the experience a lot easier and more comfortable. that's what you're paying for

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The "hurr durr ur poor" mentality is the surest sign I don't need a thing

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Might be too poor for education too.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >doesn’t know if he wants them or not
                newbie

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A stick doesn't have the little metal stud on the end that sticks to rocks and roots like velcro. That little point is where 50 percent of their effectiveness comes from.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's genuinely strange how many of these threads devolve simply because some posters refuse to accept that different people might have different preferences, bodies, injury history, levels of comfort etc. that wind up impacting their gear decisions.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      that's autism for you

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I prefer to carve my own wizard staff

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're good for rocky, uneven water crossings and flat lands that are flooded/mucky. You can easily catch a toe or sink in the mud unevenly and the poles can prevent you from falling. A must have in mucky Alaska unless you enjoy being covered in mud or shredded by falling on stream rocks.

  21. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Trekking polls help you not look homeless too, which is important in towns where you might deal with cops. No homeless or vagabond is gonna have 200 dollar carbon fiber poles. Which also helps hitchhiking, just keep them visible and people will know you're a hiker not a bum

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You use them to push yourself forward while you walk. The work of moving forward is normally 100% on your legs, but poles let you transfer some of that load to your arms instead. This enables you to hike longer distances before exhaustion or injury occur.

    So I suggest to use them for full day and multi day hikes.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >buying walking sticks
    yikes
    >finding a good sized stick on the trail
    based and stickpilled

  24. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I thought they were gay af until I thought frick it, I'll try them and took a couple from work.
    Really good for river crossings, you can't go anywhere here without a few here.
    I just carry one and only use it on rivers.
    Still feel kinda gay carrying one though.

  25. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >here is benefits of thing and why lots of very experienced people use them
    >HURR CONSOOMER GO SHILL FOR REI
    >WHAT ARE YOU FAT HAHAHAHA I HIKE MORE MILES THAN YOU
    >JUST USE A STICK BRO (code for broke poorgay)

    Reminder that this board is useless for actual advice since 80% of the posters are bushcrafting fatoids carrying larp equipment 2-3 miles from the car park to pretend they are super secret army soldiers.

  26. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just went looking for antler sheds. Basically bushwacking either up or down a hill or a cross through deadfall. They were invaluable.

  27. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah they are great with lots of benefits when hiking, especially with a heavier pack, rough terrain, and/or steep inclines. I didn't use them for a decade and then when I was renting some gear, it came with trekking poles so I said frick it and never looked back. The straps and ability to adjust them are great advantage over just a long stick. Ones with the springs are worth it, too.

  28. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For flat land I can leave them. For alpine approaches with a big pack, they can make you twice as efficient on the way up and halves the impact on your knees on the way down. No, one will not help in this way. No, a stick will not help in this way

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