Is harvesting sand/gravel off public lands a viable business?

>mineral materials such as sand, gravel, and crushed stone are extracted from BLM administered public lands are used for ready-mixed concrete, asphalt, and many other building materials.
>There is no specific application form for requesting removal of mineral materials from public lands. Persons interested in buying mineral materials should contact the local BLM Field Office

Low lease rates (like $165 for 20 acres) makes it almost free to collect ... is this too good to be true?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >BLM administered public lands

    every damn square inch of dirt in those areas is sacred to some native american somewhere. didn't they recently lay claim to the fricking moon as part of their sacred shit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There’s something cool about keeping the moon sacred. We shouldn’t turn the solar system into a junkyard.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There has to be a clause in there somewhere stating you can't set up a mining operation to remove sand and gravel off the land that you lease or else big gravel would have already bought it all up.

    T. guy with a couple of gravel pits leased out on my land.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If it's in the middle of nowhere like most BLM land it would probably cost way too much to truck fill to a cement plant or wherever, that's probably why it was never an issue. It's just not economically viable for anyone but the daydreaming OP.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You know they set up concrete batch plants and asphalt hot plants anywhere right? They have large generators to power everything. The main factor is getting their crushers and plant set up as close to the job as possible so they don't have to truck the finished product very far to the jobsite or hwy project.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And? You're still burning gas + time over the increased distance between A and B. Whatever stage of production the stuff is in, it's high mass and low value. The BLM land the OPs talking about doesn't even exist outside a few bits of the wild west where nobody lives.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          trucking the aggregate hundreds of miles to the batch plant is the same as trucking it hundreds of miles to a stationary plant... In either case, the cost of transportation will exceed the value of the load, which is why this whole thing doesn't fricking matter.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And? You're still burning gas + time over the increased distance between A and B. Whatever stage of production the stuff is in, it's high mass and low value. The BLM land the OPs talking about doesn't even exist outside a few bits of the wild west where nobody lives.

          I guess I don't know the particulars of most BLM land, but are there usually any roads nearby that need re-paving or chip-and-sealed? Because if it is next to any local project then it might be worthwhile to set up and mine some gravel. If not, then yeah probably not worth it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      OP here, so I think I got confused, there's a program for collecting sand, rock, gravel but you have to pay the fair value for whatever you take, and that's different than the $165 lease program which gives you an exclusive 20 acre claim to prospect there for unlimited gold, silver, gemstones, etc. Seems strange that the bare rocks you have to pay full price for but the gemstones they practically give away for free.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        probably because strip mining an area and mass exxing everything is a bit different from digging an area up and leaving at least 99.999% of it behind.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/mineral_rights

    I've cut hay on the right of way off public roads before. No one seemed to care. That may be a viable alternative

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you want money why don't you go work at a call center or something and leave the dirt alone?

    You sand digging frickers ruined one of my favorite canyons in my country by cleaving the entire hill for a fricking gas station.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Besides all the other issues mentioned, there's usually all kinds of permitting fees and regulatory costs involved with any kind of sand/gravel mining regardless of who owns the land; whether it's an active riparian landscape or dry, sand and gravel rich areas are usually tied to or near enough to a watershed that environmental impact assessment and planning are usually part of the equation, along with some level of remediation of mined areas after the operation is finished.

    In other words, you don't get to just dig out what you want and walk away leaving open pits and gouges and piles of tailings that affect drainage and runoff patterns, not even out in the middle of the desert. Even on private land anywhere near civilization those kinds of operations usually require some kind of long term development plan to leave a park or business park or home sites once the mining is over.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If it's nit the Indians, it will be an environmentalist

    You'll have someone changed to your bumper and then the atf will.come.by and shoot your dog. You have not bribed the right people to do thod

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    consider the following - in areas where land is expensive and hills are in the way, sand/gavel companies pair with real estate developers to buy the hill(s) and litterlly mine all of the dirt, sand, and gravel from the hill lowering the entire ground surface to what the developer wants and then the develop builds homes on the new flat ground, and a lot of the dirt, sand, and gravel has been produced and sold, or is available for landscaping.

    Also, I see sand and gravel operations buy up unwanted rocky land at near the base intermittent streams subject to debris flows and flash floods and mine the sand, gravel, cobbles, and bolders there and the stuff is repalced after big rain events. These are usually located about 10 to 20 miles from major areas where there is a lot of construction to reduce trucing costs.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You know Sand has to be specific right? They use river sand.

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