Is an executioner sword a practical weapon in a fight?

Is an executioner sword a practical weapon in a fight?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    against an opponent armed with a wooden spoon yes
    /thread
    next question

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not OP but you can kiss my white ass

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    use pic rel

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I mean if you have a good amount of precision and you aim for the neck then I think it would be pretty practical, the only thing that would be an issue is the weight.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not really. Having a point for stabbing weak points is just as important as having sharp sides for slicing

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    look my point is it's a big piece of sharp metal, if your opponent is a cowering old lady or whoever you can bash them into a pulp with it like your going ham with a baseball bat on that kid who keeps shitting on your lawn, if an opponent of equal skill with a normal sword of equivalent size than the opponent would have the advantage
    now let's all frick off and drink coffee since it might be good for us

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm pretty sure that an executioner sword had sharp edges, they just didn't have a point.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They're heavy (to kill cleanly) and ornamental (for ceremonial purposes). Not really good for a real fight.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Does OP's pic look ornamental though?

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    impractical compared to other swords but still pretty good, ranging from quite good to meh depending on how its balanced.

    landsknechts loved their one handed katzbalgers that basically didnt have a point.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      did everyone just forget that not every sword was meant to have a point?
      the katzbalger was meant to CHOP at people, idk why people act bewildered that it didn't have a point, it wasn't meant for stabbing.

      people just assume every sword is supposed to be a "general purpose" weapon instead of specialized for one thing or the other

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        I’ve always been confused why the Katzbalger didn’t have a point, with how warfare at the time had gone back to pike’s galore you’d think they would want a point on their short sword when they got close and personal with other pikemen.

        Yeah the katbalger always confused me as well. I realize the sword is optimized for chopping, but having a point on it wouldn't diminish its chopping ability at all, while also wielder the ability to stab someone in a pinch.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          did everyone just forget that not every sword was meant to have a point?
          the katzbalger was meant to CHOP at people, idk why people act bewildered that it didn't have a point, it wasn't meant for stabbing.

          people just assume every sword is supposed to be a "general purpose" weapon instead of specialized for one thing or the other

          the advantage of points is that they stick into things. the disadvantage of points is that they stick into things. when you are routed, overwhelmed, disarmed of your primary weapon, or ambushed by multiple opponents, it is best that your weapon of last resort does not get stuck in anyone.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I realize the sword is optimized for chopping, but having a point on it wouldn't diminish its chopping ability at all
          Of course it would, look at the most choppy swords like the kilij, falchion, 1796 LCS, some of them do have a point, but really aren't made for giving thrust. A pointless end DOES make a better chopping sword, especially at the very end. When you have a short sword as the katzbalger, it's important that you are able to cut with the very tip, same problematic as with, yes again, the japanese sword for instance, at least those with a beefy kissaki instead of a triangular one.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      did everyone just forget that not every sword was meant to have a point?
      the katzbalger was meant to CHOP at people, idk why people act bewildered that it didn't have a point, it wasn't meant for stabbing.

      people just assume every sword is supposed to be a "general purpose" weapon instead of specialized for one thing or the other

      I’ve always been confused why the Katzbalger didn’t have a point, with how warfare at the time had gone back to pike’s galore you’d think they would want a point on their short sword when they got close and personal with other pikemen.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stealth BOTNS thread?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      based book but i still dont get why he cheated on whatever girl he was with in the garden of autarch

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Jolenta had them big sweaty breasts and JUICY thighs, Severian just wanted to get some of that action.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Jolenta was supernaturally hot

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      would the whole mercury in the sword thing actually work?

      • 2 weeks ago
        KM

        I rather doubt it. The implied idea that you'd get more devastating blows out of it without extra effort (light to raise, heavy as it falls or whatever the quote was) is certainly not based in reality, physics isn't keen on that kind of thing. Instead as you cut you'd have to force the mercury tip-wards yourself with centrifugal force, and accelerate it up to speed as well, to get the same amount of momentum and energy out of it as you would from a sword that simply had the mass out here permanently instead.
        As for the construction of it, well, given that t he books are science fiction there's obviously ways to make that part work. In reality however it'd be a bit tricky at least. Sword blades aren't terribly thick things, and these executioner's swords apparently tends very much towards very flat blades (I'm not sure I'm prepared to call it a rule of thumb quite yet, but it certainly isn't rare that blades with a broad profile also go for very thin blades, and vice versa, something to be aware of when looking at profile photos). So the channel for the mercury would have to be very thin, and drilling a hole that thin and straight (or even worse, exactly as not-straight as the blade itself may be) might be tricky. I'm also wondering a bit about how such a narrow channel would play along with the extremely high surface tension of mercury. (And while mercury won't attack iron and steel with the same gusto that it goes after aluminium it might perhaps be aggressive enough to cause an issue here?)

        Now reality does have one analogue to to this, and that's blades with an open channel in them into which a number of small metal balls have been placed and can move up and down the blade. Usually known as "tears of the prophet", to the best of my knowledge this is a thing from Islamic India. It appears to be a purely decorative feature though, the one example I can show is as you can clearly see not for the faint of wallet.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's been a while since I read the book but I always interpreted the whole mercury thing as just shifting the point of balance. From towards the handle when you hold the sword vertically in front of you like was required in the whole execution ceremony to towards the tip when you swing it in a very specific way downward to cut off the person's head. Kind of seemed more like a weird but cool limited purpose tool than an effective battlefield weapon

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/JYooMEP.jpeg

        I rather doubt it. The implied idea that you'd get more devastating blows out of it without extra effort (light to raise, heavy as it falls or whatever the quote was) is certainly not based in reality, physics isn't keen on that kind of thing. Instead as you cut you'd have to force the mercury tip-wards yourself with centrifugal force, and accelerate it up to speed as well, to get the same amount of momentum and energy out of it as you would from a sword that simply had the mass out here permanently instead.
        As for the construction of it, well, given that t he books are science fiction there's obviously ways to make that part work. In reality however it'd be a bit tricky at least. Sword blades aren't terribly thick things, and these executioner's swords apparently tends very much towards very flat blades (I'm not sure I'm prepared to call it a rule of thumb quite yet, but it certainly isn't rare that blades with a broad profile also go for very thin blades, and vice versa, something to be aware of when looking at profile photos). So the channel for the mercury would have to be very thin, and drilling a hole that thin and straight (or even worse, exactly as not-straight as the blade itself may be) might be tricky. I'm also wondering a bit about how such a narrow channel would play along with the extremely high surface tension of mercury. (And while mercury won't attack iron and steel with the same gusto that it goes after aluminium it might perhaps be aggressive enough to cause an issue here?)

        Now reality does have one analogue to to this, and that's blades with an open channel in them into which a number of small metal balls have been placed and can move up and down the blade. Usually known as "tears of the prophet", to the best of my knowledge this is a thing from Islamic India. It appears to be a purely decorative feature though, the one example I can show is as you can clearly see not for the faint of wallet.

        You're assuming it is merely mercury (and steel for that matter).
        Remember that Wolfe uses archaic words to describe something that is like - but unlike.
        For example Destrier is ye olde term for horse but as we read we learn the Destriers have claws, tusks, and eat meat - they are not simply horses with a quaint name. So who really knows what the hydrageum really is?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The cover art is gorgeous but it misunderstand's severian's cape. It's supposed to be blacker than black, and also it pretty clearly has no internal ornaments, as it would clash with the executioner's ethos.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Did Severian murder that prostitute that he had to defeat in order to join the mercenary cavalry outfit?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's the tactical efficacy of fighting with a flower?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not really. Balance is shitty and you literally can't thrust. You could make it work for a given value of work, but all other things being equal you'd get rekt by the guy with a proper longsword.

        If the flower bends time and space and kills on contact, pretty good I'd say.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it's the best one hit weapon in elden ring

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Worked for Severian

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There have been a lot of executioner sword threads lately. Makes me wonder if certain fantasy books have become required in mainstream curriculum or something.

    Anywho, swords built from the ground up as tools of execution would be kind of doodoo in a swordfight. Great cutters but the issue is that you have to actually hit someone with it. However, some executioner swords were regular longswords that were ground down and IMO those things would be mad decent in a fight. That said, cuts are the easiest thing to armor against so pick your battles.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Compared to other options? No.
    They're heavy and balanced in a way that is optimized for a single swing with no regard for recovery.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It would just be a handed version of broad swords like the Irish ring pommel sword ,Sudanese kaskara and waloon/basket hilted sword

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >is a several foot long razor a practical weapon

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >executioner sword
    >made for executing a bound criminal
    >practical weapon

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you like BotNS try Soldier of the Mist, it is a very /k/lit novel if you like Classical Greece.
    Latro also has a special sword, a Kopis (imagine a sword sized Kukri) that has been blessed to never fail him so long as he never fails it. At one point it cuts right through a Spartans Aspis and the arm it was attached to.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's still a piece of sharp metal, you could do a lot worse for a weapon. An executioner was actually killed with such a sword when he got into a fight with another executioner, this was in Stockholm in the 16th century IIRC.

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