Indoor wood stove

>deebly goncerned about global instability in the coming winter
>can't install a permanent woodstove because I live with my parents

How can I set up a wood stove to work indoors without burning the house down or making it a permanent fixture?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just use some 4" exhaust duct bro, preferably low the ground so it doesn't ruin the sightline of your house

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >can't install a permanent woodstove
    >because I live with my parents
    bro wat
    If you live with your parents, maybe bring it up with them and pool money together to get something that isn't going to kill you in your sleep with carbon monoxide.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >maybe bring it up with them and pool money together
      They don't get it. Their idea of prepping is a gas generator.

      >can't install a permanent woodstove because I live with my parents
      If your parents are the ones paying the heating bills, then it's their choice and their problem.
      Explain the benefits and offer to help install one, but if they still don't want to, then oh well.

      >their choice and their problem
      >just freeze to death, bro
      It's for emergencies. They'll change their tune when its their only option.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you live in Europe, you're not going to freeze to death. It doesn't get that dangerously cold unless you're in scandinavia or a few other regions, and it's not hard to keep your house at ~7C, even if it's freezing outside.
        If you live in North America, your gas/electric service isn't going out.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >your gas/electric service isn't going out.
          It is if the rail workers strike. 80% of coal plants will go off-line in 30 days or fewer with no rail service. That's nearly 40% of all electrical production.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you live in Europe, you're not going to freeze to death. It doesn't get that dangerously cold unless you're in scandinavia or a few other regions, and it's not hard to keep your house at ~7C, even if it's freezing outside.
            If you live in North America, your gas/electric service isn't going out.

            Aren't there a million articles saying US infrastructure is held together with hot glue and nails?
            A better question to ask would be "What happens when it goes out?"
            >read Incerto, Antifragile by Nassim Taleb

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              That doesn't mean you'll freeze to death, dumbass. Instead of fearbait books consider preparing in pragmatic maximally versatile detail.

              If THEY want a wood stove you can add one later. You can make them from all sorts of metal parts including steel drums.

              If serious about preparing for reasonably likely adversity you'll already have everything you'd need to

              Make one or many stoves
              Repair and maintain everything you use including plumbing, vehicles, electrical systems, water systems (I keep two replacement well pumps, a Bosworth Guzzler to prime and as backup, and duplicate parts to swap pumps since I'll need all that over the next couple decades anyway. I don't buy asswipe by the sheet either.
              Harvest then use scrap or available materials quickly and easily
              Replace any important wear parts

              Get there before fretting over a stove.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >fearbait books
                It's a book about uncertainty and decision making, you mongoloid. It has nothing to do with collapse fantasies.

                >If THEY want a wood stove you can add one later. You can make them from all sorts of metal parts including steel drums.
                >Just become a metalworker when SHTF, bro, you'll definitely have everything you need on hand
                It's called PREPARING, not REACTING

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Aren't there a million articles saying US infrastructure is held together with hot glue and nails?
              Yes. And some of the best engineers in the world.

              But more importantly, there's a huge difference between a bridges, power lines, water treatment that are well past their due date and "power is out because of 30 day-long rail strike."

              And OP, a gas generator is a good idea. Just be realistic about it's capabilities. Have a list of things that it can and will be powering. If you are worried about heat, get a propane heater and a 20lbs tank. Or get a kerosene heater.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >kerosene heater
                Now we're talking. Especially if you live near an airport and know a worker.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >rail workers strike
            Or the communists sabotage the rails.
            They have instructions for that.
            Hell, some asshoe was asking how to do it here on PrepHole a week ago.
            Shoot anyone fucking with rails.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You have to remove a significant portion of the rails to derail a train. There were a whole bunch of US Army tests during WWII specifically to feed to resistance cells in Europe.

              [...]
              Aren't there a million articles saying US infrastructure is held together with hot glue and nails?
              A better question to ask would be "What happens when it goes out?"
              >read Incerto, Antifragile by Nassim Taleb

              >Aren't there a million articles saying US infrastructure is held together with hot glue and nails?
              Yes, it worked when it was designed and built because a vast majority of the people alive were a) not insane and b) white.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            Aren't there a million articles saying US infrastructure is held together with hot glue and nails?
            A better question to ask would be "What happens when it goes out?"
            >read Incerto, Antifragile by Nassim Taleb

            There is no realistic scenario where the rail workers strike for an entire month, and nobody else does anything in the meantime. A compromise would be reached in a matter of days, maximum. If not, the military would begin to operate the most critical rail routes, like the ones feeding power generation.

            As for some other "grid down" scenario:
            The grid can easily be broken into a ton of smaller regions, so the lights will stay on in places where the demand is not greater than the generating capacity. The issue with inadequate/outdated electricity infrastructure isn't that the power will go out and never come back on, because it will. It just may not stay on, and then you're dealing with the consequences of industry and businesses not having reliable access to power. Countries that don't have reliable 24/7 electricity service have a difficult time escaping poverty since production of goods and services becomes extremely inefficient.

            Basically, if all the power is going out for months, your primary concern will be the fact that there will be no food in the grocery store for you to buy. You can make a wood stove out of a barrel in a few hours, but it takes a few months to grow food.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >If not, the military would begin to operate the most critical rail routes, like the ones feeding power generation.
              I love how people think the military can just come in and do anything. The military doesn't know how to operate a freight train. That's absurd. They can barely perform missions for which they are trained.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >there is no realistic scenario where joe biden will simply declare the border is the most secure now in history as more than a million illegal aliens enter each month

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Average night temperature in Helsinki is around -10 C. Colds snaps often go down to -20 C. Thankfully we have a lot of nuclear power plants to make it through the winter.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Describe your real situation in detail because the OP is worthless. You just want a wood stove by the looks of it and being young plus needing to ask PrepHole for basic advice suggests you should more thoughtfully evaluate your real (fantasies have zero place in emergency planning) situation.

        >Their idea of prepping is a gas generator.

        If you live in the US that's quite reasonable, but remember home heating is a comfort desire not a survival need. Clothing for each person sufficient for ANY reasonably likely weather OTOH is so important not having that is stupid anywhere.

        Make a list of all your senpaitachi cold weather gear and include sleeping bags. If you have those then you'll be safe and reasonably comfortable, and you need them regardless of global politics.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >More detail
          I would like to have a safe way to use a cheap portable/camping woodstove indoors in case of an emergency.
          A normal, permanent woodstove would be redundant and unused 99% of the time, and my parents don't buy into prepping, so there goes the sales pitch for a permanent fixture.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            First spend that money on wool blankets/glove liners/hats. Really.

            I have major safety concerns, unless you are willing to store a real stove, firebrick, double wall pipe, and all the flashing, etc required to install it safely.

            House fires (and the wildfires they cause) would be a leading cause of death if the power ever went out for any real amount of time. There's little chance fire services will be able to keep up, let alone respond in any meaningful way.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >can't install a permanent woodstove because I live with my parents
    If your parents are the ones paying the heating bills, then it's their choice and their problem.
    Explain the benefits and offer to help install one, but if they still don't want to, then oh well.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i made one with a 50 cal ammo can and some piping from the hardware store. it's really easy man. you got this. you dont need a welder either. just get a drill an angle grinder bolts and nuts and you'll be fine. keep your chin up OP. also dont forget to make stands for it so it doesn't burn the floor.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >indoors
    Why not spend time outdoors anon, keep toasty hot as much as you want, enjoy a steak and drinks before heading back in for bed

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >run ‘indoor’ fire
      >go to bed after eating
      >wake up dead due to toxic gasses

      No thanks

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Man, how do you wake up dead

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hmm... seems simple enough.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the steel firebrick glass whatever plate under most stoves is pretty useless.

      really it has to be in front of the stove or extend till here, its for the case embers spatter out of the door

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      run the pipe going out the widow at an upward slope dont leave it flat like that

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Retard talk to your parents and tell them you'll pay for it. And honestly dude, I lived for 3 years without heat in eastern Europe due to glory of Communism. You'll be fine. We'd just be in the apartment with 5 layers of clothing and sleep under a pile of blankets. You can just get some good winter sleeping bags and make sure there are coats for everyone and you'll be OK.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Your parents will kick you out of the house

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