Hurricane alley anons make sure you update your homes to newer building codes or you will die.

Hurricane alley anons make sure you update your homes to newer building codes or you will die.

>CoreLogic showed that wind losses in Lee County, one of the coastal areas with the most damage in Ian, were twice as high for structures built before 1996, when Florida began tightening building codes for wind load.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yeah let me just demolish my home and spend $200k getting it rebuilt on the off chance it can withstand the next hurricane
    oh wait, american houses are built out of cardboard and it'll be half-rotten anyways

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      HAAHAHAHAHAAHAHA get fucking obliderated shartturdifarts!!!!!!!!!!!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >spend $200k getting it rebuilt
      This isn't 1995 lmao

      Also, you can just wait for it to get demolished by a hurricane and then get a huge fat check to build a much nicer house from insurance or FEMA.

      I live in Florida, and I can tell you that the vast majority of new-build homes are built like dogshit. Of course more expensive custom built homes like the one pictured are still standing, but the homes being built by major developers are trash. I will constantly see homes less than three years old with tarps on the roofs because the beans they hire to build them couldn't give a shit about the quality. The name of the game is quantity over quality, because retard northerners are willing to pay $400k for a 1600 square foot town home in an over-developed area.

      building code requirements for things like rafter brackets etc have gotten much more strict in FL in the last 25 years.

      Legitimate question, why do people in high hurricane risk areas build houses out of drywall and popsicles instead of bricks?

      Based brick bro

      Although building codes are supposedly agnostic to the materials used, the energy requirements make it far more expensive to build with concrete, masonry, or brick when compared with light wood framing. Also because of the labor dynamic in the USA, the labor for anything other than wood is more expensive.
      There are some areas in the world where OSB and plywood would be the more expensive to build with than concrete, steel, or brick because of local supply chain factors and the labor dynamic.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You don't need to demolish your home. A hurricane will do it for you and take you with it if you don't act now.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My house is made from ICF, I really don't care about hurricanes

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But what about your roof?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They make icf roofs too

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's a flat roof made out of concrete with a traditional roof over it for rain collection and other things

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          our house in southern LA is all high fired brick with internal steel columns wherever there's door and window openings, and has a flat roof framed with 2×12s on 12" centers and diagonal bracing.
          Place is built like a bank and in 62 years the only hurricane damage its had was a corner of the roof membrane peeling back in Andrew, that collapsed entire shopping centers less than two miles away.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Legitimate question, why do people in high hurricane risk areas build houses out of drywall and popsicles instead of bricks?

            Based brick bro

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Insurance money, they get blown away, insurance pays for a new one every few years and everybody is happy

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Insurance money
                Except that in FLA insurance is scammed to the max and people are finding out it's pretty much useless

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              a lot of coastal areas would not support solid construction. Most "brick" homes in southern coastal areas are only brick veneer.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I live in Florida, and I can tell you that the vast majority of new-build homes are built like dogshit. Of course more expensive custom built homes like the one pictured are still standing, but the homes being built by major developers are trash. I will constantly see homes less than three years old with tarps on the roofs because the beans they hire to build them couldn't give a shit about the quality. The name of the game is quantity over quality, because retard northerners are willing to pay $400k for a 1600 square foot town home in an over-developed area.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I agree. I moved to central FL two years ago, and the worst I have seen is on townhomes and apartment buildings. Single houses are mostly block built, at least on the first story, and stand up well but every larger structure looks like they're made out of toothpicks and cardboard. The builders are just trying to cash in on the market boom until prices go back down, so quick and shitty is the game.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >make sure you update your homes to newer building codes
    I'm on it

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Make your house round or at least not a box with vertical walls and you won't need to worry about being blown away. Concrete dome houses are a thing.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >having .32 french
    I think I found the issue

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >house built in 1930 was still standing in 2022
    WTF? I thought all buildings in Florida are rebuilt every year because of hurricanes??
    Anyways, the new one is going to get demolished anyway and someone has to pay for that.

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