How well does training with .22LR translate into shooting with larger calibers?

How well does training with .22LR translate into shooting with larger calibers? Is it different with a rifle versus a pistol?

I have a Browning Buckmark that is rather unreliable and I'm thinking about selling it to pay for 1000 rounds of 9mm.

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >gun in 22lr is "unreliable"
    Have you tried cleaning around the feed ramps? Thats all it takes for mine and it's smooth sailing.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    yeah

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    general shooting technique is something you burgers do not have and probably never will.
    selling firearms is the most homosex idea i have read on this board either.
    you are a colossol gay.
    delete this thread.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Its homosex to sell something you no longer want? Keeping shit you dont like forever makes no sense.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    eurofag sport shooter here, 22lr is an excelent caliber to practice proper stance, grip, aiming and shooting technique. putting hole on hole on 15-20y with a tiny bullet from a simple pistol is a good training for bigger calibers.
    it will however not help you in the slightest if you ever think about using a gun in a defensive scenario, that's an entirely different discipline

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >it will however not help you in the slightest if you ever think about using a gun in a defensive scenario, that's an entirely different discipline
      please elaborate.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >eurofag sport shooter here,
      Stopped reading and hid your post

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Shoot steel and stop sniffing farts you dumbass. 'Muh hole on a hole.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the basics are no different.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's good for learning fundamentals/mechanics. It's not massively different from other calibers except in rapid fire, but as that's something mostly needed in defensive shooting that's an entirely different skill set involved, and won't have much carryover beyond having learned shooting fundamentals.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    does anyone know the case of that one jap dude who autistically trained with nothing but airsoft his whole life but kicked a whole lot of ass at a competition when handed the actual firearms his airsoft ones were modeled off of?
    no reason to waste your money anon

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I heard of him, but it was drowned out by the sounds of Lucas' boytoy mouth frotting on my junk.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Calm down Ivan hes not a conscript

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Actually got me hard thinking about that

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty well as far as sight acquisition, trigger control, presentation, etc goes. Obviously it really doesn't help much with recoil control and can even introduce grip issues in that area if you go back to shooting it a ton from shooting larger calibers. Pretty much exactly what you'd think tbh.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You start children on a .22 for a reason. It's the easiest to use when learning the basics. Once you have the basics, move on up.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A drop in slide conversion kit on your duty or carry handgun is useful for trigger time

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    bump

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