How the hell were ungided torps a thing?

How the hell were ungided torps a thing?
how did some random skipper back then on a sub or DD hit a moving target bajillion miles away in the sea with zero terminal guidance?
did they have precognition or living-FCS tier godlike aim or something?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The vast majority of torpedoes did not find its target.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This.

      they had a magic power since lost to time called 'math'

      And this. Same magical power that allows you to triangulate your position on a map and find your exact location can be used to find a vessels trajectory, speed and bearing, which when calculated could be used to launch a slow moving tube ahead of it.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        they had a magic power since lost to time called 'math'

        This. They literally had these refrigerator sized electro-mechanical computers just to track ships and compute firing solutions.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    they had a magic power since lost to time called 'math'

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Weapon guidance is also just math. A lot more math.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      STOP DOING MATH

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://archive.org/details/1958-02_IF/page/4/mode/2up?view=theater

      What if every man could have the power of a computer inside him?

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You literally have the answer in your picture. The spread of torpedoes has a greater coverage, and mostly even one torpedo hit is lethal.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The same way as naval gun laying, just basic math. The range, your heading, their heading, time to target, etc.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's this diagram from ? A game ? Video ?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      looks like cold waters

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What's this diagram from ? A game ? Video ?

        Definitely cold waters.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how did some random skipper back then on a sub or DD hit a moving target bajillion miles away in the sea with zero terminal guidance?

    Accuracy by volume. You don't launch a single torpedo at a ship. You usually dumped an entire 3 to 6 torpedo launcher spread at a vessel, if not more by dumping all your torpedos on deck. Additionally ships don't operate alone, so a division squadron could coordinate to flood an entire area with torpedos at an approaching target. Even submarines operate in groups and could do the same thing. A well coordinated attack could mean upwards of 50 or more torpedos headed towards a single target or group of targets.

    And with that last point, the enemy doesn't operate alone either. The enemy is likely operating in a group of no less than 4 ships. Large groups may contain over 20 ships, so it's a possible target rich environment. If one torpedos misses it may very well strike another target in the enemy formation.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >bajillion miles away
    The Belgrano was sunk by a spread of three WW2 Mark 8 torpedoes fired from a range of 1400 yards.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have you ever heard of this weird thing called mathematics? You can use it to predict trajectories and intersections

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just from playing bideo james with slow moving projectiles I know that fanning out multiple shots like in your picrel gets you pretty good accuracy if your opponent doesn't really change course.
    Ideally you'd be shooting at an opponent who's unaware of your presence so he's going to be at a constant speed and constant heading unless sheer coincidence would have you shoot at a ship that's about to change course.
    Even in combat, ships can't turn or reverse on a dime so you're still bound to make hits on a maneuvering vessel. As others said most torpedoes shot would have not hit, but if you're in a surface ship being hunted by a submarine that's still a bricks-shitting situation because you need to be lucky every time and the submarine only needs to be lucky once.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gets you pretty good accuracy if your opponent doesn't really change course.
      bingo. And like you said, an opponent is rarely aware of a submarine attack therefore they likely aren't changing course or speed. Even if they ARE aware of the sub and try to take evasive maneuvers cargo ships aren't exactly fighter planes. They're very slow to accelerate or maneuver, especially the steam-powered ships that were in use back then.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sometimes, you get lucky.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sometimes, you don't

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Ah, the IJN and IJA, undercutting and fighting each other all the way to war's end.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >don't tell the general, he thinks the americans did it
        best IJA sitcom episode

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >hit IJA ships
        >"mistake""

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They also hit IJN minesweeper, so there was some collateral damage

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I used to play the Silent Hunter games and manual TDC is extremely satisfying. I haven't tried Uboat though.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      My Black person.

      https://i.imgur.com/jRBvfOV.png

      How the hell were ungided torps a thing?
      how did some random skipper back then on a sub or DD hit a moving target bajillion miles away in the sea with zero terminal guidance?
      did they have precognition or living-FCS tier godlike aim or something?

      >bajillion miles away
      They got pretty close

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Predictive firing solutions from mechanical calculators. Impressive, is it not? Never underestimate the ingenuity of angry men who want to kill those guys way over there. A tale as old as time.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >every firing solution is a math equation

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone has already said the important stuff, especially about volume of fire and quantity of targets. Warfare is about areas not individuals. So here's something small that people on the internet sometimes overlook: A ship isn't a character in a videogame being controlled by an adhd kid who will evade a lot of incoming fire just by tapping ADADADAD out of habit. It has a lot of inertia by mass, but it also has a kind of inertia caused by the fact that it takes a chain of command to get the boat to turn at all. If your target is unaware and cruising in a straight line, it's quite simple to plot an intercept. If they're on alert or doing passive evasion which understandably becomes quite popular in eras of unrestricted submarine warfare, the chances of a lone sub striking a lone target become much smaller.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Ship (Allchat): TORPEDOsdasasadaewawwdasaddasdaawdaawdawdawda

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >bajillion miles
    More like 1 mile and the vast majority missed.
    Ambushes agaisnt convoys worked pretty well because you fire a spread into a big group that isn't manuvering and even if you miss the first couple of ships there are plenty more the torpedo can still hit.

    Give "Silent Hunter" a go if you want to nerd out over the details of how to actually do it.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >meanwhile Mk37s were too slow to catch a warship literally going in circles on one spot.
    MK 37 was a sub-to-sub torpedo, not anti-surface

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