How much money would it cost to start reloading common calibers (mainly 9mm and .223) is it even worth it?

How much money would it cost to start reloading common calibers (mainly 9mm and .223) is it even worth it?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    about a grand, also its not worth the lead poisoning. most reloaders do it just to spite the glowies.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      not worth

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    about 500ish all told for a basic progressive press and quality of life stuff like case collators and wet tumblers. primers are like 7ish cents and I dunno what your case situation is but I doubt you would have to brass israelite very hard for common stuff.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >is it even worth it?
    no
    >How much money would it cost to start reloading common calibers
    about 500 smackers

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on what you get. I make all of my own .223 and enjoy it. You get a lot better performance because you can control every aspect of the process. It can be as good or as bad as you want. It's pretty cool trying to tune your ammo to your particular firearm. To answer your question though: it depends on what you want. It takes a lot of money up front for your press, dies, and components (different tools, brushes, and gages) so it takes a loooooooong time to see and cost savings. That is if you can manage to grab you powder, bullets, primers, and brass for a reasonable price. There's a lot of time that goes into making ammo too. Hours of prep and hours of finishing. If you're cool with having another expensive hobby, I'd say go for it anon. In my experience, the cost is about the same, but my ammo is better than factory ammo.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      also it keeps you steady through dry times like election years when you might want to hold off on shooting a bunch of factory ammo and you have components stored up.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Exactly. Every time I see small rifle primers on sale I always grab them. That goes for anything. I've been slacking lately though.

        There’s essentially three times where reloading makes sense.

        1) you’re shooting old, obscure, or just plain expensive ammo. Think weird old wildcats.
        2) you’re trying to match ammo to your specific gun in order to eke out every last drop of performance.
        3) you’re shooting A LOT. Like tens of thousands of rounds a month.

        Checked. A couple of years ago, I torture tested a PSA upper. Probably put 10-15k through it. My groups started opening up at the end. Pretty interesting. If I were to grab another one, I'd buy a better barrel, or just build my own upper.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That only works when you can also find reloading supplies, which dry up because of primers getting moved to new ammo production. You can store ammo first and just make sure you have enough supply to keep you through a dry year already. For 9mm and 5.56 the economics aren't there vs cheap bulk ammo.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Handloading makes financial sense only for obscure or "magnum" calibers, benchrest autism, or very high volume.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      most revovler calibers are worth reloading. 38spc is mad expensive now and if you use moonclips, the brand of brass if very important.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There’s essentially three times where reloading makes sense.

    1) you’re shooting old, obscure, or just plain expensive ammo. Think weird old wildcats.
    2) you’re trying to match ammo to your specific gun in order to eke out every last drop of performance.
    3) you’re shooting A LOT. Like tens of thousands of rounds a month.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >there's three scenarios where reloading makes sense:
      >1. you have autism
      >2. you have autism
      >3. you have autism
      good to know

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >t. terminally stupid
        good to know

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          no I just have autism, that's why I'm here
          that's why I reload, it was good to get confirmation

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You reload to shoot more obscure rounds more often and will spend more than they guy who only shoots factory ammo because the "savings" can be addicting. I have 400 rounds of 158gr XTP .357 magnum in nice nickel cases because I made what Underwood makes at 800 ftlbs for 25% the cost.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what's your recipe

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    About $500. Imo it's not worth reloading common calibers unless you're running tens of thousands of rounds a year, their economies of scale mean I can't beat their prices by enough to make it worth the labor of reloading them. If you've got something even slightly uncommon, or you're wanting a load that isn't commercially available, then it's well worth it. E.g. my 32-20, 218 Bee, 7.65x53.5 are difficult to find ammo for and what there is is hella expensive; for my 38 Super I have a self defense load that is a 125gr jhp @ 1520 fps, way hotter than anything commercially available. But I buy 9mm, 5.56x45, and 7.62x51 without a second's hesitation or twinge of remorse.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >38 Super 125gr jhp @ 1520 fps
      Mo fricking Hammed that's fast. What's the recipe?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Nosler 125gr protected tip (basically a ballistic tip)
        Winchester small rifle primer.
        VV N110. Not giving the charge, but if you look at a 10-15yo Vihtavuori loading manual you'll see 38 super loads @ ~1500 fps. Use that data and work up. Use a good micrometer to check case expansion at the web.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This..

      Unfortunately I shoot a lot of 38 special, 357, 45 LC and 454 casull…. Saving brass, saving up for reloading gear…

      >>get decent amount saved up…
      of reloading gear get 500 magnum BFR..
      to converting it to more obscure and expensive 500 bushwacker…
      >>back to stage one of saving up for reloading gear…

      Life is pain.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You could start with pic related, 500 primer, 500 bullets, a pound of powder, and a rubber mallet from harbor freight for less than $200 that would pay for itself after about 400 rounds.
    And no, it's not worth it because it's not about saving money. You should know how to handload so you can make your own custom loads that aren't offered in factories.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You'll break even at about 2000-4000 rounds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this is the only right answer, apparently anons are incapable of basic math. If you think you'll shoot at least this much within like a year then you would have made a good investment. If you only shoot like a 1k a year you aren't really gonna see any benefit or savings in a meaningful timeframe

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you look around for someones old reloading tools you can actually get just about most of the expensive stuff for dirt cheap. I was at a trade store and a dude was selling an old press loader and a bunch of dies and shit for a couple hundred bucks. Don't know the brand, it was a nasty light green color.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      RCBS?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah that looks like it. It was a couple different presses and a box full of shit and the dude wanted $200 for it but I didnt know shit about reloading at the time or what it was even worth.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          RIP

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on if you want to make your own bullets. Casting materials and tools add a bit depending on what setup you want.

    If you just want to buy your projectiles, still cheaper, then it's going to cost about $150-200 for a single stage press and the associated tools for the calibers you want to do.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You;ll break even at about 10,000 rounds of 9mm. Or 50 rounds of .218 Bee. Or 20 rounds of .375 H&H. Or 1 round of .219 Zipper.

    .218 Bee, like its parent 32-20, is an absolute gem of a cartridge. It's a real pity it's so hard to find nowadays.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Match grade and subsonic loads will see ROI faster. Youll be able to make 77gr 5.56, 190-220gr 300 blackout subs, 147gr 9mm in sub or major, all those for cheaper than to buy. 55gr 5.56 and 115gr 9mm are cheaper to reload than what they cost, but its a very slim margin and reloading is labor intensive even with a turret press.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's always worth it. Even if you buy the supplies and don't touch them for 5 years, then sell them you can make a plus.
    If you got the time, you can be your own ammo producer. 9mm and 223 are not the best option to reload, but you gonna still come out ahead compared to buying the ammo.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not including dies and components, I spent about a grand on kit to get started, but you can get going for less. Once I got into it, I bought about another grand in kit to get my setup where I'm happy. I have electronic scales, an automatic powder measure, and digital calipers, but also mechanical kit that doesn't need batteries or electricity. The only downside is both my wet and dry tumbler each require power.

    Whether it's worth it or not depends on how much you value the time spent reloading. My setup has paid for itself with me being able to load quality and uncommon ammo for less than buying it retail, mainly because I enjoy reloading in my free time. If you can't stand being meticulous, reloading won't be worth your time.

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