How long would a barrel have to be for a standard 9mm round to not exit due to friction?

How long would a barrel have to be for a standard 9mm round to not exit due to friction?

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Like really long

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Long, but not as long as my dick

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Better question, does a 9mm round become significantly more deadly out a rifle length barrel?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes. Most straight walled pistol catridges like 9x19, .38spl, .357, .44mag, .45acp will get an increase of 20-40% out of a typical rifle(16"-20") bore compared to a pistol/revolver length bore.

      That ofcourse increases effective range and terminal performance of the projectile.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Increase of muzzle velocity, I meant to say.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        .45 ACP does not gain any significant velocity from barrel longer than what is in standard 1911 pistol to warrant the extra weight.

        It doesn't even gain the 20% with lighter rounds, fmj is literally no gain.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          http://ballisticsbytheinch.com/45auto2.html
          Neat.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Biggest gains there are around 20% by going from 5 inch barrel to 18 inch and all with lighter hollow point and many times with +P ammunition, both go against what usually .45 automatic coper pistoleros larp about it.

            .45 ACP is a joke cartridge, deal with it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Velocity gain drops off pretty quick when you go beyond the sweet spot, pic related is for .357

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          yeah, that's his recent video. these are all concerning revolvers which vent SOME powder through the side of the gun (forgetting specific term), mind you.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Do take note of the cylinder blowby gas

            Fair point.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Do take note of the cylinder blowby gas

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And yet 357mag leverguns spit out 158gr at 1800-2000fps.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Blame cylinder gap, unironically. At longer barrels it is easier for a gas to escape thought that small gap than to push bullet.

            lever guns don't have same problem as revolvers.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Most pistols have 4-5 inch barrels including chambers and 9x19 Parabellum is a high pressure round, I think it could easily gain from another inch or two.

      As for rifle length barrel , that's a bit vague. Rifle barrel length had been redefined with each new generation of long guns; If you mean 14.5-20 inches which is standard now, I would say no. But something like 6-10 inches would give you both extra velocity and accuracy.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    long enough

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on the powder used to load it.
    But once you exceed the length of barrel vs. the amount of gas volume, you will lose velocity. You can actually have a long enough barrel that the bullet's inertia will create a vacuum and would never leave the barrel.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >But once you exceed the length of barrel vs. the amount of gas volume, you will lose velocity. You can actually have a long enough barrel that the bullet's inertia will create a vacuum and would never leave the barrel.
      I'm sure all of that is completely new to the guy who specifically asked how long a barrel you'd need for the bullet to stop entirely.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Twelve feet should stop all 9mm loads, or do so for most loads.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    2,358 Km

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A trick question; in truth never, since the bullet would stop because of pressure difference between the expanding gas in the barrel behind it and atmospheric pressure -.not friction.
    Unless we assume firng in vacuum, then at some point the pressure behind the bullet would be so low, that the friction would stop it.
    You can get the length from weight gunpowder, avarage volume of gas from 1g of gunpowder and volume of barrel.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ok but what if its long enough that the barrel space behind the now-fired bullet becomes large enough to fully accomodate the amount of gas caused by the explosion?
      I.E. the gas is spread across so much barrel that it reaches equilibrium with the outside atmospheric pressure.

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