How long after the introduction of firearms were bows and/or crossbows still being used by European armies?

How long after the introduction of firearms were bows and/or crossbows still being used by European armies? I've read that a small number of English soldiers were still using longbows in the middle of the 17th century but was it like that in all of Europe or was that just the English being autistic about their longbows again?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There was a guy in the British army who brought a bow into WWII with him, he also carried a sword.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/51ukJR8.jpg

      It's sad to think that if they ever made a movie about this guy's life, most audiences would find it too insane to believe. Everyone would dismiss it as an unrealistic action movie.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Idris Elba cast to play Jack Churchill
        >Harry Styles co-stars as his secret gay lover
        >together they take down Nazis using ancient techniques taught to them by a London-based Shaolin Monk who refuses to let men dominate the sphere of buddhism

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    idk about european armies specifically but I know that some native americans (comanches iirc) preferred bows up until the point that repeating firearms were widely available.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In broad sense it was period between 1300 and 1600 years, about 300 years.

    In narrow term "modern" long barrel smoothbore arquebus was introduced in Europe (stolen by Europeans from Ottoman Empire concept) 1475, by the 1525 all leading European military switched to gunpowder, so about 50 years. In some places it was quite forced, like Holy Roman Empire Emperor made edict that sets that landsknecht must arm themselves with arqebus and crossbow is not a proper weapon anymore.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty crazy to see how Portugal and Spain began exploring and colonizing only like a decade after proper firearms came about

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Anon is about right about the bow. Guns appear in europe in 1356 and we know for sure longbows were used on the Mary Rose 200 years later in 1545. There may well be evidence of even later use out there. However:

      >stolen from Ottoman Empire
      Basically pure copium. The basic concept of a firearm came from China in the 900's and started really spreading in the Tang dynasty (in other words, the mongol empire). However their guns were awful. More like a metal vase that could fire shrapnel and arrows and shit over short distances. For some reason they didn't really evolve for hundreds of years, maybe it just didn't suit their tactics. Either way by the mid 1300's Western Europe had started fielding artillery. We don't know exactly what gun the first European cannons were modeled on, but gun powder and the idea of guns had already made their way over through the silk road and mongol expansion. Either way the hand gonne quickly becomes a thing at the end of the 1300's. Basically it's the simplest form of hand gun, and it evolves into the hakenbeurze/arquebus in central Europe. The oldest certain evidence of the matchlock is in Europe in 1411, the ottomans followed in 1425. Practically all early modern firearm innovation happened in Germany. It's funny because it was when European guns were exported back to China that they really started being used there. I'd go so far as to say modern hand operated guns are a German invention, and not because of the StG. But because they invented the form factor of a long barreled hand held gun with a short stock, trigger and lock.

      As for the ottomans, they build a couple impressive bombards in the late 1400's (100 years after europe). They didn't use a lot of hand guns until then either, decidedly late compared to Europe who had already invented the wheel lock by 1500. (Although it wouldn't be seen in guns until the 1520's). The flint lock is later invented in France, then percussion caps in Britain

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        In broad sense it was period between 1300 and 1600 years, about 300 years.

        In narrow term "modern" long barrel smoothbore arquebus was introduced in Europe (stolen by Europeans from Ottoman Empire concept) 1475, by the 1525 all leading European military switched to gunpowder, so about 50 years. In some places it was quite forced, like Holy Roman Empire Emperor made edict that sets that landsknecht must arm themselves with arqebus and crossbow is not a proper weapon anymore.

        The Ottomans didn't even build their cannon. They had European mercenaries design and build build them mostly. The most famous ottoman canon was basilica, designed by a hungarian canonneer Orban to batter through Byzantium's walls.
        Yep that's right a Hungarian called Orban sold out his fellow Europeans to an oriental despot for a quick buck. Time doesn't just repeat, it's verbatim.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Yep that's right a Hungarian called Orban sold out his fellow Europeans to an oriental despot for a quick buck. Time doesn't just repeat, it's verbatim.
          Yeah, I knew about that and I couldn't help thinking the same thing.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Yep that's right a Hungarian called Orban sold out his fellow Europeans to an oriental despot for a quick buck.
          It was more than that. Orban had a dream of building the biggest cannon ever and was willing to work for anyone who was willing to fund the project. IIRC he went to the Byzantine emperor and several other monarchs before he went to the Ottoman sultan, but they either couldn’t or wouldn’t pay for it.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >For some reason they didn't really evolve for hundreds of years, maybe it just didn't suit their tactics.
        Medieval Asian empires didn't do much with their guns ironically because of their stability and prosperity. In contrast, medieval Europe was a barbaric shithole permanently at war so there was a demand for military tech. There is a reason it's always barbarians conquering civilized empires and not the other way around.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >gun powder and the idea of guns had already made their way over through the silk road and mongol expansion
        First recipe for gunpowder actually appears in a book by an English monk from the 13th century, about 50 years earlier than a similar account from the arabs, pointing to the independent European invention of it.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bows were about on par with early muskets going by Musashi, although he liked bows more since you could see the arc of fire and also shoot over walls. But muskets phased out bows and crossbows everywhere they became available in a few generations simply because the logistics are so much better. It took years of special training to make a competent bowman, especially like the English longbows, but it only took a couple weeks to get someone half proficient with a musket. So more specialized units like bowmen lost their appeal, not because they were outclassed, but because it was too much of a pain to teach the skills involved anymore.
    The same is true of melee units like knights and samurai. Sure, the armor was outdated but melee was still happening in the pike and shot era. It was just easier to give them pikes where you just had to stab the other guy compared to anything more complex like a halberd or a sword where a certain level of technique was expected.
    So to actually answer the question, muskets would take over when the old guard of a given area died

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >But muskets phased out bows and crossbows everywhere they became available in a few generations simply because the logistics are so much better. It took years of special training to make a competent bowman, especially like the English longbows, but it only took a couple weeks to get someone half proficient with a musket.
      Complete English victorian boomer bollocks.
      >muh longbow!
      There were no such things as couple weeks training conscripts during that period. Units that switched to gunpowder first were professionals. Some (like Ottoman janissaries) were lifelong soldiers, no weekend warriors from Britain can come even close (not to mention Ottoman archery completely kicks down British archery).

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The reason that the firearm was a peasant weapon in Europe and an elite weapon in the Ottoman empire is because Arabs suck at war so only thier elites were skilled enough to use one effectively.
        For Europeans the system was so cheap to build and so easy to use that it quickly began displacing spears as THE weapon for arming peasant levies

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          arabs were also too poor and tech-moronic to actually field and use firearms like europeans do

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Except of course in china where bows were still common in late 19th century

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you could still see them used under mission specific circumstances

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bows still retained some use case, like ad hoc arms for militias, until about the mid 16th century. In 1545, the English militias that repulsed the French invasion of the Isle of Wight were predominantly armed with bows but at the same time England was fielding as many arquebusiers as it could afford on the mainland and in the ships. If they'd had any to spare for the island they would certainly have sent them. After about 1600 no seriously outfitted European army would depend on bows.

    >But muskets phased out bows and crossbows everywhere they became available in a few generations simply because the logistics are so much better. It took years of special training to make a competent bowman, especially like the English longbows, but it only took a couple weeks to get someone half proficient with a musket. So more specialized units like bowmen lost their appeal, not because they were outclassed, but because it was too much of a pain to teach the skills involved anymore.
    This is modern revisionism not supported by any documentation from the time. In 16th century England, archery was seen as a common or natural skill that any random peasant you plucked from the countryside would be reasonably proficient in, which was probably due to laws mandating archery practice that had been in force throughout the middle ages making archery a culturally ingrained skill in the population. Arquebusiers, on the other hand, were costly to train or hire.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    To the East bows were also popular until the 18th century.

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