how hard is it to convert a normal ac minisplit into a solar one?

how hard is it to convert a normal ac minisplit into a solar one?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How hard is it to not be moronic?

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Certainly you can hack something together off an inverter but the solar ones have "Brushed DC" motors, essentially a 3 phase motor with a VFD with hacked firmware to do MPPT.

    If you don't care about efficiency so much should be rather easy. If you want to do it right it's probably going to be harder than it's worth but I would try getting some of the solar "well" mppt drivers and try to hack them all to worth together.

    If you have a normal AC AC, expect to have everything based off single phase motors and those are not suitable for this type of control. So you'd have to start by swapping them out, along with the compressor for brushed dc or 3 phase versions. It's just probably not a good idea.

    Alternately just get a battery and a solar charge controller and an inverter and just toggle the thing on when you have enough juice to run it for a while.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    always wondered why this actually isnt a R&D priority. If they developed a 12v pump that could do similar enough job as 1/3hp pump we could literally have solar powered units not just mini splits but refrigerators and other things that require heat pumps.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >12v solar
      doesn't make sense, 24v at the minimum, 48v preferably

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        why not just make it 220 while you're at it.
        the entire point is to make it more widely available.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          point is 12v sucks for power distribution, waste of copper, it's use in cars is obsolete too.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            most solar systems have barely any distance between the pannels and the loads
            but i concur that the change to 24v should have happened before
            48v is more difficult bc you dont have a lot of safety margin

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              If you have a nice day on 48v systems, you are moronic. Wear gloves and stay dry. Most 48v systems, if not all, come with a breaker/disconnect on the face of the battery. Here's a hint: turn it off first.

              https://i.imgur.com/pfBqRnF.jpeg

              Certainly you can hack something together off an inverter but the solar ones have "Brushed DC" motors, essentially a 3 phase motor with a VFD with hacked firmware to do MPPT.

              If you don't care about efficiency so much should be rather easy. If you want to do it right it's probably going to be harder than it's worth but I would try getting some of the solar "well" mppt drivers and try to hack them all to worth together.

              If you have a normal AC AC, expect to have everything based off single phase motors and those are not suitable for this type of control. So you'd have to start by swapping them out, along with the compressor for brushed dc or 3 phase versions. It's just probably not a good idea.

              Alternately just get a battery and a solar charge controller and an inverter and just toggle the thing on when you have enough juice to run it for a while.

              > solar well-pump drivers
              MPP makes them. I believe they have a small single phase unit, then three-phase units in a couple of sizes.

              https://i.imgur.com/PorTERW.png

              how hard is it to convert a normal ac minisplit into a solar one?

              You get one that's already set-up for solar like the EG4. Or you build your system like mentioned, where it runs your unit on battery/solar. The main thing is you are spending at least $2000 more to have an inverter all-in-one with enough battery capacity to handle a 3/4 ton / 9 kbtu single phase inverter minisplit.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                is not that you wont be able to do it safely easily, is that the random joe will do stupid shit with it bc technically any moron can work on it bc low voltage regulations.
                if we are going to go to the route of you better know what you do it, we could go waaay waay high voltage. 48v is a weird middle ground for barely complying with the legislation, but not actually moron safe
                i wonder why 220v * square 2 volt systems are not more popular, making an inverter for them would be absurdly easy, and are as dangerous as anything else in AC

              • 4 weeks ago
                Prepare

                > Lets a random joe work on his 48v system

                There's your problem, anon.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Your pic is pure fantasy.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Being that we already have a world full of 120/240v refrigerators, heat pumps, etc it makes more economic sense to just use inverters to turn DC from solar/batteries into AC. Then one single small unit can pump power into everything in a normal house instead of having to replace every single appliance.
      This is a solution in search of a problem.

      is not that you wont be able to do it safely easily, is that the random joe will do stupid shit with it bc technically any moron can work on it bc low voltage regulations.
      if we are going to go to the route of you better know what you do it, we could go waaay waay high voltage. 48v is a weird middle ground for barely complying with the legislation, but not actually moron safe
      i wonder why 220v * square 2 volt systems are not more popular, making an inverter for them would be absurdly easy, and are as dangerous as anything else in AC

      Peak voltage of a RMS 240v system is ~338v. While it might be simpler in some way to design an inverter that runs directly from a 338v+ DC bus, this is the first step in an inverter that runs from a lower DC input... They convert 12v/24v/48v or whatever to an internal higher voltage bus, then use sinusoidal PWM to run an H bridge across a filter to produce the 120v/240v output.

      A modern inverter is already a drop in unit that can use commercially available batteries to interface with standard appliances. Changing all the batteries to a much much higher voltage system would have regulatory barriers which wind up increasing the cost to the end user to the point that it's not worth it.

      This is already a solved problem. OP, just get a solar charge controller/inverter that can directly power your current minisplit and which uses grid power to supply the deficit. Or add batteries until you can run it fully offgrid if thats what you want. It makes more sense than trying to swap the compressor and blower motors with low voltage DC brushless and then implementing a new control system.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the good inverters doesnt step up voltage at all, they convert whatever dc they have in low voltage ac and then send it through a transformer, then a close loop looks for the out voltage and adjust the first parts.
        there are cheap chink boards that provides the control loop, you can easily do an inverter from an ups see this example https://www.instructables.com/DIY-Pure-Sine-Wave-Inverter/
        and there are 12/24/48v motors that can be easy replacements, shit is really standarized nowadays

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Get solar moron.

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