How do I remove these dumb fcking rivets on these seat mounting brackets?

How do I remove these dumb fcking rivets on these seat mounting brackets? Cant even get through one of them after an insane amount of drilling. Even got new titanium bits, do I really have to go get an angle grinder to remove some simple rivets? Wtf. I've tried top and bottom but cannot get them to break or pop. They arent spinning with the bit either so that's not the issue. What do they make these things out of?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ive looked up a lot of videos and information about types of rivets and people removing these from other seat mounting brackets and they only have to drill for two min or less before they bust through. the hardware store didnt have a rivet destroyer gun so the old power drill method is what im doing, i used cutting lube.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stop buying shitty drill bits, stop drilling at 2500rpms, stop limpwristing the drill
    Slow, heavy pressure, with a real drill bit will go right through.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      im using the best ones i could get that specifically say heavy duty for drilling metal. im drilling slow with a lot of force, pretty much my entire body weight as leverage. havent let it go high rpm at all. something is no good here. ill go to a bigger hardware store tomorrow that might have even stringer bits.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        they have work hardened from your moronicness. forget cutting tools at this point, you need to switch to abrasives. do you have a angle grinder? if not you can get knock off ones for like $30, use a cut off wheel to melt the fricker out.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          shiiiit. i think its because im using a ryobi wireless power drill. maybe this little piece of shit doesnt have enough torque to do the needful.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If the drill hasn't stopped spinning, it has enough torque.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Get a Dremel and a pack of reinforced cutoff wheels. They'll cut right through your work-hardened rivets. Been doing it this way for years. Don't bother with that ez lock stuff.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i think i have a dremel but not a very powerful one. im gonna ask my neighbor if i can use a angle grinder or something.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            All Dremels and Dremel-alikes are low powered. They are also much smaller than a 4" angle grinder and as such you are less likely to chew up your rails with it.

            https://i.imgur.com/AenAgCO.jpg

            Get a Dremel and a pack of reinforced cutoff wheels. They'll cut right through your work-hardened rivets. Been doing it this way for years. Don't bother with that ez lock stuff.

            >keep drilling
            Too late for that.

            https://i.imgur.com/XKZdMNZ.jpg

            Since you’re grinding it off anyway, put a carbide ball bit in your dremel and grind away.
            Ti is not that hard.

            This guy is trolling you.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >

              https://i.imgur.com/AenAgCO.jpg

              Get a Dremel and a pack of reinforced cutoff wheels. They'll cut right through your work-hardened rivets. Been doing it this way for years. Don't bother with that ez lock stuff. (You)
              >>keep drilling
              Frick. I meant to quote

              just have to keep drilling, it sucks

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          All Dremels and Dremel-alikes are low powered. They are also much smaller than a 4" angle grinder and as such you are less likely to chew up your rails with it.
          [...]
          >keep drilling
          Too late for that.
          [...]
          This guy is trolling you.

          word thank you, ill get some of those cutoff wheels and give it a shot with my chink dremel.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            With a dremel and a tungsten bit I was able to cut a suspension bolt. It is tedious work, but tungsten bit doesn't get dull easily and continue cutting

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Dremel also has some carbide cutters for fricking around in tight spaces.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >something is no good here.
        Look at your picture, you are grinding the rivet not biting in and cutting it.
        It means your drill bit isnt sharp enough, or it means high rpm and/or low pressure.
        The bigger the drill, the more pressure you need to push it through metal.
        The harder the material (those rivets arent soft), the more pressure you need (especially if you dont have hard drills)

        Use a drill bit that is the size of the rivet diameter, you do not need to remove the whole head, just punch a hole in the middle and it falls off. The cutting pressure will be much higher, because of the smaller drill size.

        Just dont be surprised your crappy bits still dont work.
        You can go in and buy some shitty Cobalt bits, they are harder and will cut harder materials easier.

        shiiiit. i think its because im using a ryobi wireless power drill. maybe this little piece of shit doesnt have enough torque to do the needful.

        >i think its because im using a ryobi wireless power drill
        Did you completely stall the drill by using your body weight?
        No?
        Then its not the drill, its you or the bits.
        If your bits were biting, and you were pressing down and the drill stalled, then you can blame it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i actually did stall the drill quite a few times doing that, and lost the bit a time or two when using the wrong rotation direction. but i still take responsibility, i think i used dull shitty bits the first try, went and got heavy duty titanium ones (they didnt have cobalt bits but i was looking for those) but ill go get some better at a bigger store like home depot. i figured i got deep enough to punch a hole in it and get it to seperate but i guess not.

          thanks for the advice never drilled much metal before especially not automotive rivets which i assume are about as strong as they come as they need to endure a lot of force.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      frick. youtube 'cutting steel with a drill press'.

      That's what you want. Do that. Then search youtube for 'cordless drills, first time user'. And then 'drilling steel with cordless drill'

      /thread

      >Go slow, use slow speed / 1

      The frick? The few times I've drilled through steel, setting my drill on high speed / 2 worked infinitely better. I was using a bolt extractor and thought I was fricked because I dremeled a slot for a screw driver first and wasn't making any progress on low/1. Spent way too much time trying to torque my way through and made nanometers of progress. Threw it in high/2 and finished the job in seconds.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Speed largely depends on the diameter of the drill bit and the material you're cutting.
        Here's a decent reference chart
        https://www.imperialsupplies.com/pdf/3660-5_F_Drill_Bit_Sheet_Update.pdf

        From experience, I'd recommend center drilling to stop the drill bit from walking around; use cutting fluid; use a drill press or mill with the part fixed in a vice; make sure you're using the appropriate drill bits (material, hardness, etc.)

        Most rivets should be made out of a soft metal like aluminum because they have to deform with relatively low applied force.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >2 worked infinitely better
        Sure it works better, in destroying your drill bits and giving you ragged oversized shitty holes.
        Thats why every hack does it, and then complains about his drill bits being "shit" no matter how much money he blows on them.

        Unfortunately for OP, he did exactly what you are saying, but he isnt trying to hack up soft mild steel so it doesnt work.

        People vastly overestimate how many RPMs you should be using, and underestimate how much force needs applied.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i used 1, i might be moronic but i undersrood from reading beforehand to go slow with a lot of force, unfortunately i still fricked it up by using shitty bits to start with.

          • 1 month ago
            Bepis

            Stop blaming the bits. Basic ass DeWalt bits should drill like picrel if you’re using them the right way and they’re not super dull from prior user error.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Zinc

              • 1 month ago
                Bepis

                >phone face down on workbench
                you're fricking moronic

                It looks like an empty phone case, moron.

                Wasn’t zinc, wuz steel

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >phone face down on workbench
              you're fricking moronic

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It looks like an empty phone case, moron.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Post pictures of bits, nobody knows what you are actually using.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Small bits require higher speeds. Op should be using a small bit first to drill a pilot hole. 1/8" is a great overall pilot bit size for about anything.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Most people ITT have never held anything heavier than their computer and know shit vicariously through Internet videos. Mild steel you can use any decent twist drill and just fricking send it. It will drill through eventually, unless you're trying to drill a 3/4" hole or some other moronic thing.

        The first person who replies "n-n-no!!! You need lower rippums!!! and muh cutting oil!!" has never stepped foot in a machine shop supply house. Fricking mild steel, not some exotic stainless steel.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Small bits require higher speeds
          This is a gross mischaracterization of whats actually going on.
          Your RPM is wholly dependent on your rate of feed.
          Smaller diameter drills require less force to feed, so your ability to use them at a higher RPM is easier to achieve.
          The weaker and more womanlike you are, the lower the RPMs you must use even with smaller drills.

          Drilling a bunch of pilot holes and going up drill sizes is a great option for women.

          OP isnt drilling mild steel, and he isnt using decent twist drills.
          >The first person who replies "n-n-no!!! You need lower rippums!!! and muh cutting oil!!" has never stepped foot in a machine shop supply house.
          You need lower RPMs, and you should be using cutting oil.
          And its true, ive never stepped into a machine shop supply store. Almost no machinist does.

          Thats the job of the non-union minimum wage delivery driver who is picking up a package ordered by the tool crib manager.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            ->

            Small bits require higher speeds. Op should be using a small bit first to drill a pilot hole. 1/8" is a great overall pilot bit size for about anything.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >This is a gross mischaracterization of whats actually going on.
            >Your RPM is wholly dependent on your rate of feed.

            You do know that the cutting edge of smaller bits is traveling slower than a larger bit at the same rpm right? I mean you're really not completely moronic are you? The surface feet per minute of the edge of the bit is what determines the correct speed for a cutting tool. That's why small parts in a lathe require a higher rpm than large parts. Speeds and feeds are independent from one another. They are two separate variables that you can change at your will to achieve a proper cut.

            Small bits require higher rpms. That is a statement of fact. Anyone that argues this is pants-on-head moronic.

            According to you a 1/8" drill bit and a 4" hole saw can run at the same speed as long as I feed my hole saw faster right?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              > Fake drill bit table
              Haha… where can you get a drill bit made of aluminum??? Not even china. Who made that table?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Haha… where can you get a drill bit made of aluminum??? Not even china. Who made that table?
                Nice bait.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Speeds and feeds are independent from one another. They are two separate variables that you can change at your will to achieve a proper cut.
              True, thats exactly what I said, your RPM is dependent on your rate of feed when drilling a hole.
              Your SFM in a vacuum means nothing, its all about how its applied with your feed rate.

              Thats exactly why when you clamor on to just "send it" through steel with any drill bit under 3/4", its a stupid fricking statement.
              Its hilarious you bringing up SFM at all when your solution is to just ignore it altogether and "send it".

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Please show me where I said to "send it"

                Oh you can't, because I never did.

                >your RPM is dependent on your rate of feed

                You choose an appropriate RPM by the diameter of the cutting tool. Then you choose an appropriate feed rate to get a proper chip load. That is the real world way to do it. You do not just select some random ass feed rate and then adjust the RPM to make it work. Your 1/8" drill bit spinning at 20 RPM is not going to drill efficiently. It is a waste of time as are you.

                >Your SFM in a vacuum means nothing

                What vacuum? It is a real world application. If you are drilling mild steel which cuts properly at 90sfm a 1/8" bit would need to be spinning at 2750 RPM. At a max speed of 2100 RPM on a Milwaukee 2904-20 drill that means full fricking throttle. A 1" drill bit would burn up at that speed, because to get the same 90sfm it would need to spin at 343 RPM. A 4" hole saw would need to spin at 86 RPM. Your solution is to drill everything at 50 RPM and just use cutting oil though right?

                Like I said you are pants on head moronic.

                Go ahead and quote the post that said "send it" and my posts too, so I can screenshot it and prove to you that you're an even bigger moron than you already proved yourself to be. I drilled more holes through steel in the past few nights at my shop than you apparently ever have in your entire lifetime you clueless piece of shit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Please show me where I said to "send it"
                lel, ok

                Most people ITT have never held anything heavier than their computer and know shit vicariously through Internet videos. Mild steel you can use any decent twist drill and just fricking send it. It will drill through eventually, unless you're trying to drill a 3/4" hole or some other moronic thing.

                The first person who replies "n-n-no!!! You need lower rippums!!! and muh cutting oil!!" has never stepped foot in a machine shop supply house. Fricking mild steel, not some exotic stainless steel.

                . This is the exact post I responded to, and that response is specifically what you quoted and have been seething about since.

                >"Mild steel you can use any decent twist drill and just fricking send it. It will drill through eventually, unless you're trying to drill a 3/4" hole or some other moronic thing."

                You are a dumbfrick for posting this, or you have been defending the dumbfrick who did.

                >You choose an appropriate RPM by the diameter of the cutting tool. Then you choose an appropriate feed rate to get a proper chip load.
                Its so blatantly obvious youve never actually programmed or touched a real machine tool in your life.
                Every calculator or formula is not gospel, they work on theoretical maxes. You are limited by your machines, your toolholding, your workholding, your actual tools.
                They are a very rough starting guide, and the purported tool speeds are the first thing you dial back. Its a balancing act, not a "MAX TOOLSPEED DICTATES EVERYTHING"

                Your fascination with using the supposed max tool speed based upon a random calculator as justification for just "sending" it with a hand drill is fricking hilarious.

                Cant see the forest through the trees.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You are the only person who has quoted that post, twice now. I never said it, and I never defended it.

                You are an imbecile.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Please explain to OP how you calculate and gauge your feedrate using your hand drill, to get that proper chipload running max SFM

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Please explain to OP how you calculate and gauge your feedrate using your hand drill, to get that proper chipload running max SFM

                You push harder or not so hard to get a proper chip coming off of what you're drilling. If you're getting tiny filings like OP then you need to push harder. If you're getting a huge fat chip and jamming the bit into the work until your drill chuck slips then you need to hold back a little fricking bit.

                It's not rocket surgery, but you're obviously too moronic to understand.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It's fricking soft steel on a car seat. What would an auto mechanic do? Take a sharp 1/4" and push hard. It's not fricking machining.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Thats not what I was told.
                The proper "real world way to do it" would be
                >You choose an appropriate RPM by the diameter of the cutting tool.
                >Then you choose an appropriate feed rate to get a proper chip load.
                says anon

                Please show me where I said to "send it"

                Oh you can't, because I never did.

                >your RPM is dependent on your rate of feed

                You choose an appropriate RPM by the diameter of the cutting tool. Then you choose an appropriate feed rate to get a proper chip load. That is the real world way to do it. You do not just select some random ass feed rate and then adjust the RPM to make it work. Your 1/8" drill bit spinning at 20 RPM is not going to drill efficiently. It is a waste of time as are you.

                >Your SFM in a vacuum means nothing

                What vacuum? It is a real world application. If you are drilling mild steel which cuts properly at 90sfm a 1/8" bit would need to be spinning at 2750 RPM. At a max speed of 2100 RPM on a Milwaukee 2904-20 drill that means full fricking throttle. A 1" drill bit would burn up at that speed, because to get the same 90sfm it would need to spin at 343 RPM. A 4" hole saw would need to spin at 86 RPM. Your solution is to drill everything at 50 RPM and just use cutting oil though right?

                Like I said you are pants on head moronic.

                Go ahead and quote the post that said "send it" and my posts too, so I can screenshot it and prove to you that you're an even bigger moron than you already proved yourself to be. I drilled more holes through steel in the past few nights at my shop than you apparently ever have in your entire lifetime you clueless piece of shit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It's fricking soft steel on a car seat. What would an auto mechanic do? Take a sharp 1/4" and push hard. It's not fricking machining.

                I mean, I would commend you, I would refer people to you, I might even suck that d if you suggested all of that when it came to extracting a broken bolt from a cylinder head. It's a car seat. Even a torch would take care of it without damaging the rail.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                kek, sounds to ME like you never stepped foot in a machine shop supply house!

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                You must charge by the hour.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous
  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    just have to keep drilling, it sucks

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Since you’re grinding it off anyway, put a carbide ball bit in your dremel and grind away.
    Ti is not that hard.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    and i think they were biting as i could see metal shavings, but i could also have been stalling the drill by choosing the wrong settings. the top switch which is 1 or 2 i had on 1 because it seemed to have lower speeds which is what i wanted, and then around the nozzle area where the bit goes was numbered from 1 to like 22 or something, just sort of left it at whatever it was becuase i wasnt sure what it does (moron)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >numbered from 1 to like 22 or something
      That's the clutch. It's so when you're driving screws into wood/drywall it stops automatically and doesn't shove them through. Turn it all the way to the highest number, there should be an extra symbol that looks like a drill bit or something similar, that's what it should be set to for you know, drilling. Your "stalling out" was probably just the clutch activating.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        makes total sense i did have it on the drill icon but tried some others at one point so that is likely true and what the "stalling" was, as it sounded like a locking mechanism.

        https://i.imgur.com/A0K34el.jpg

        >and i think they were biting as i could see metal shavings
        In metal cutting, the size and shape of a chip indicates how good a cut is.
        In general with a hand drill, you just want big even chunks and you are fine.

        When there are no chips, but its just grit and shavings, thats an indicator of a problem.
        When you create shavings and grit, you are just spinning your drill bit around in whats essentially sandpaper dulling the blade.

        When you make clean big chunks, the bit pulls it up the spiral and throws it off away from the drill so you dont "redrill" them dulling your bits.

        You were removing a small amount of material, but at such a low rate you just keep grinding it up and heating it up. And thats the quickest way to dull a drill bit.
        And if those rivets are high carbon, when you heat them too much they will get physically harder due to work hardening. If you have a hard material, and its the same hardness as your dull drillbit, you wont cut it.

        Cobalt bits drill hardened steel, so its advisable to use those on high carbon stuff.
        I have no clue if the rivets are high carbon, but they could be.

        really appreciate the information, they well could be high carbon. and i understand now that the tiny shavings indicates not good cutting.

        so the dremel is my only hope or can i attempt cobalt bits and drill more, i dont want to ruin them immediately.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The good thing about the carbide ball and borrowing you’re wife’s dremel is that you can actually just have her get them out while you do your dailies.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >so the dremel is my only hope or can i attempt cobalt bits and drill more
          Cobalt bits would work fine, but they arent cheap and you are likely to torch them.
          Carbide burrs would work great, but they are also not cheap. Also they suck dick on a dremel, you really should be using real full sized burrs and stones with a real die grinder.

          If you dont need the bracket anymore, an angle grinder would be the cheapest and easiest solution.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >and i think they were biting as i could see metal shavings
      In metal cutting, the size and shape of a chip indicates how good a cut is.
      In general with a hand drill, you just want big even chunks and you are fine.

      When there are no chips, but its just grit and shavings, thats an indicator of a problem.
      When you create shavings and grit, you are just spinning your drill bit around in whats essentially sandpaper dulling the blade.

      When you make clean big chunks, the bit pulls it up the spiral and throws it off away from the drill so you dont "redrill" them dulling your bits.

      You were removing a small amount of material, but at such a low rate you just keep grinding it up and heating it up. And thats the quickest way to dull a drill bit.
      And if those rivets are high carbon, when you heat them too much they will get physically harder due to work hardening. If you have a hard material, and its the same hardness as your dull drillbit, you wont cut it.

      Cobalt bits drill hardened steel, so its advisable to use those on high carbon stuff.
      I have no clue if the rivets are high carbon, but they could be.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    frick. youtube 'cutting steel with a drill press'.

    That's what you want. Do that. Then search youtube for 'cordless drills, first time user'. And then 'drilling steel with cordless drill'

    /thread

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Cut off wheel on a side grinder…bfd

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Remove any springs. Explode them out with an oxy acetylene torch and spray paint them.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    papa had hand tools. a chisel, hammer, and room to kick the dog is all ya need boy.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    whenever i see Amazon reviews that are a picture of a broken drill bit, 1 star and just a "broke on first use" i know an idiot like OP is behind the drill

    use a centre punch to make a seat for your drill-bit to actually gain some purchase

    use a drill bit smaller than the actual rivet to make a pilot hole, and then go up in size to remove the rivet

    firm pressure, low rpm

    use a more powerful drill

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Cant even get through one of them after an insane amount of drilling
    user error 100%

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