How did men-at-arms store their armor and protect it from rust?

How did men-at-arms store their armor and protect it from rust?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you were a German giga-autismo like picrel, you'd probably polish your armor every day, morning and evening. For everyone else, your armor would be painted/enameled or passivated with an acid wash (browning/russetting).

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >for everyone else
      'white' armor without any leather or paint was pretty normal by the 1400s
      Hawkwoods Condottiori army was called The White Company because of this

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >you'd probably polish your armor every day
      If you own a suit of armor you are wealthy. Your squire polishes it every day.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Arms rooms: Many castles, fortresses, and armories had dedicated rooms or halls where men-at-arms stored their armor, weapons, and other equipment. These rooms were often kept cool, dry, and well-ventilated to prevent rust and damage.

    Oak chests: Armor was often stored in sturdy oak chests or coffers, which provided protection from dust, moisture, and pests. These chests were often adorned with intricate carvings and had intricate locks to prevent unauthorized access.

    Cloaks or covers: Men-at-arms would often cover their armor with cloaks or canvas covers to prevent dust and moisture from accumulating. These covers were designed to be easily removed and cleaned when needed.

    Wax or oil coatings: To prevent rust, men-at-arms would apply wax or oil coatings to their armor, such as beeswax, linseed oil, or olive oil. These coatings helped to protect the metal from corrosion and made cleaning easier.

    Rust-resistant materials: Some armor components, like rivets and fasteners, were made from rust-resistant materials like bronze or copper. These materials were more resistant to corrosion than iron or steel.

    Regular maintenance: Men-at-arms would regularly clean and inspect their armor to prevent rust and damage. They would use rags, brushes, and cleaning solutions to remove dirt, grime, and sweat.

    Storage in dry environments: When possible, men-at-arms would store their armor in dry environments, such as under eaves or in dry rooms, to reduce the risk of moisture accumulation.

    Use of insect repellents: Insects like moths and beetles could damage armor by eating through leather straps or consuming fabric padding. To prevent this, men-at-arms might use insect repellents like lavender or camphor to deter pests.

    Armorer's expertise: Skilled armorsmiths (or "armourers") would often provide advice on how to store and maintain armor. They would also repair and maintain the armor to ensure it remained in good condition.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT. I HATE AI. I HATE CHATGPT.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >YOU NEED TO GO TO A LIBRARY TO GET YOUR INFO LIKE I WAS FORCED TO AS A KID IN SCHOOL!!

        frick off, you would rather be ignorant than put effort into learning.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          GPT isn't a reliable source moron. It's worse than even the lowest-quality books.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Based anti-GPT chad
            [...]
            Seethe more AI homosexual, you will never be a real source of information.

            >guys look, im a cool anti-technology hermit guy just like kaczynski!

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >"I prefer my facts curated!"

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          You sound underage and homosexual

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            that "whose toes are those" video still scares me

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >It's on the internet and therefore always true.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >learning
          >copypasting AI slop
          no

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >tech cultist doesn't know what is GIGO
          embarrassing

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Based anti-GPT chad

        >YOU NEED TO GO TO A LIBRARY TO GET YOUR INFO LIKE I WAS FORCED TO AS A KID IN SCHOOL!!

        frick off, you would rather be ignorant than put effort into learning.

        Seethe more AI homosexual, you will never be a real source of information.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In buildings it was stored on open shelves and racks, during march it can be stored on pack horses in a bag .
    To protected against rust armor was oilled and vaxed. Beeswax was applied on surfaces that doesn't rub it off, underside. Some museum artifacts still have beeswax applied centuries ago.
    Also yes naked steel rusts extremely fast. One day in the field under rain and you come back into camp with rust patches
    And you need your page clearing and repolisihing armor and reapplying the oil.
    Naked steel "white armor" plate was a bling thing. To show off your wealth (polished armor costed 10 times more without any increase of quality) and ability too look crisp against elements. Later (15-16 century) when plate armor became more widespread it was painted to reduce maintenance.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >Later (15-16 century) when plate armor became more widespread it was painted to reduce maintenance.

      I've read the exact opposite. Later, fire arms and pike formations became increasingly common and plate armor had to be proofed against fire arms and was increasingly rare due to ever greater complexity plus a drop off in efficacy and the general change in force composition.

      Whereas the early period of plate it was fairly ubiquitous on the battlefield.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        It partly depends on what is considered a "full panoply," versus a coat of plates. Armor utilizing plates was common even with infantry earlier in the development of plate, but plate hit its highest level of development when it had already become mainly a rich person thing.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No one cared who I was until I put on the mask

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The Italian apothecary hath decreed the donning of masks to stem the Cathay plague

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it is called a bevor

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        When you're an "essential worker" but can't afford healthcare.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        My favorite will still always be those Norse helms with the chains surrounding the neck and throat area
        bet that would look sick combined with a bevor, just replace the chains with a wool wrap-around

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Oh, well, let me regale you with the ancient, mystical secrets of armor storage from the era of men-at-arms. Brace yourself for the sheer brilliance of this technique: they didn't. Yes, you heard it right. These valiant knights of yore, after a long day of clanking around in their shiny metal suits, simply tossed their armor into a corner and hoped for the best. Who needs protection from rust when you have the power of wishful thinking, right?

    But oh, in rare moments of enlightenment, they might have wiped off the sweat and blood with a cloth. You know, to keep it pristine for the next jousting match or dragon-slaying escapade. And if they were feeling particularly industrious, they might have even applied a thin layer of grease. Because nothing says "medieval chic" like a greasy suit of armor, ready to repel both rust and unwanted social interactions.

    So, there you have it, the epitome of medieval armor care: a mix of neglect, hope, and maybe a dollop of grease if you're feeling fancy. Ah, the romanticism of the Middle Ages.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They are blued and greased

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      blued was a relatively late development

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    back then they didn't really have good oils for preserving metal like we do now. Seed oils are mega ass at rust prevention and would have to be applied regularly. So my guess is for long term storage for something like a breastplate, they'd use beeswax. Then when it's taken out of storage, oil it up to make it shiny again

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      I use olive oil on my cast iron pots which rust in 5 minutes if not oiled, works perfectly well. Olive oil has been around a while.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Oils, mostly. A thin layer of some oily substance like beeswax, pitch, or actual vegetable oil can form an oxygen proof barrier that stopped rust. At least while the oil lasted.

    Other than that you just tried to keep the armor in a dry place. Usually attics.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Damn I love that Beeswax can be used for anything almost

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Paint it

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    olive oil

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      I use olive oil on my cast iron pots which rust in 5 minutes if not oiled, works perfectly well. Olive oil has been around a while.

      >Olive oil
      Perfectly good in the short term but olive oil goes rancid in about 3 months. If you want to store and forget about your armor you need something heavier like tallow.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >Perfectly good in the short term but olive oil goes rancid in about 3 months. If you want to store and forget about your armor you need something heavier like tallow.
        Would something like synthetic 5w-50 work?

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Eh probably. I'm not sure of 5w-50 since it's not usually used in open air conditions but I know WD-50 works well. I've used it on everything from bike chains to door hinges and never run into problems.

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Rub oil into it, then wrap with cloth and store in a box. Much like we do with guns.

  12. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >How did men-at-arms store their armor and protect it from rust?
    They steamed it using water thrown on iron plates over charcoal and this halted rust after cleaning. It was not done by men at arms but boys and camp followers and they often got burned.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Wut

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