How did it take the flintlock over a century to replace this absolute clusterfrick of a mechanism?

How did it take the flintlock over a century to replace this absolute clusterfrick of a mechanism?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It just werks. Usually. Sometimes. If it's not too humid.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Genuinely impressive when you consider it is all made by hand. Water wheel if you are lucky? Slaves.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      All made by hand.
      The wood, transporting it, digging and refining the ore. Forging, Shaping, Drilling, Powder, Projective.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because that absolute clusterfrick of a mechanism was objectively superior to the flintlock in every way but price.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      in what ways? genuinely curious

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's a question of would you like a pistol that fires most of the time or two pistols that fire some of the time

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So aside from cost, they are better because they’re more reliable? Is that because the sparks are produced in the flash pan or what

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Like

            Much faster lock time (the sparks are generated directly in the pan) and much more reliable (longer sparking stroke, and the sparks are created directly in the pan). This is why wheellocks were still being made and used as hunting firearms by the wealthy right up until the caplock era. It btfo flinters - if you could afford the price of entry. So flinters dominated military usage and other price-sensitive markets, but wheellocks held on in the upper end of the market.

            says it's more reliable because it directly sparking the pan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShQhajEm2Y8

            Unlike a flintlock which sparks near the pan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yp7jxZ1dzNc

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Much faster lock time (the sparks are generated directly in the pan) and much more reliable (longer sparking stroke, and the sparks are created directly in the pan). This is why wheellocks were still being made and used as hunting firearms by the wealthy right up until the caplock era. It btfo flinters - if you could afford the price of entry. So flinters dominated military usage and other price-sensitive markets, but wheellocks held on in the upper end of the market.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          This, the main advantage of the flintlock was that it was cheaper and faster to mass produce. It was a step backwards in reliability. However, it was also faster to fire as it was faster to wiener the flintlock than it was to span a wheellock.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >It was a step backwards in reliability.
            I suppose that depends on how you're defining "reliability" because while wheellocks might have more reliable ignition I would trust them less by pretty much every other standard; they're much more fragile in general and all of those hand-fitted moving parts are just begging to get fricked by a teaspoon of mud and grit in a way that a flintlock isn't.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              That's fair. It would be more accurate to say the Wheellock has more reliable ignition, though the flintlock is the more durable weapon in terms.

              what exactly is the difference between the snaplock, snaphaunce and flintlock? the mechanisms look almost exactly the same to me

              Snaplock = has a flint and a frizzen but the frizzen is not attached to the pan cover. The shooter has to manually open the pan cover before shooting. The sear which releases the wiener moves laterally.
              Snaphaunce = as above, but now the pan cover is mechanically linked to the frizzen so it opens automatically.
              True flintlock: Frizzen and pan cover are now one piece, the sear moves vertically instead of laterally.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    so... where is the wheel??

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >wheel lock
      >look inside
      >no wheel

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's on the other side, OP posted a) the backside of the mechanism b) the most complicated idiotic iteration of the wheelock possible, like a homosexual douchebag troony

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      On the other side. The axle it rotates on is near dead center in the photo.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >to replace this
    it didn't you dipshit. the wheellock was for rich men's toys. the flint lock replaced the snaphaunce and matchlock.
    not get the frick out before i kill your dog

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the wheellock was universally used in cavalry pistols and cavalry carbines until the flintlock replaced it. you like to talk big for a mentally moronic homosexual.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >the wheellock was universally used in cavalry pistols and cavalry carbines
        Exactly, they were toys for richgays.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >toys
          that's a pretty copey way to spell "superior weapons"

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They were temperamental, fragile and extremely expensive; there's a reason they rarely show up outside of cavalry weapons and presentation guns.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >t. seething poorgay

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >temperamental
              Much less than matchlocks, the primary ignition mechanism of the day.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Much less than matchlocks
                Matchlocks weren't temperamental when it came to ignition, probably more reliable than flint but it was a huge pain to train soldiers to take care of the match cord and keep it clean and lit and not blow themselves up with it accidentally. Flintlocks use the same basic mechanism but took away some potential for human error. Hard to argue with a handful of flints vs carrying bags of det cord around a battlefield / campground

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Standardization of production. If any artisan could make a functioning flintlock as well as the cartridges they would have since it would be cheaper to make.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >G11 at home

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it took about a hundred years for flint ignition systems to develop from the snaplock, which was much worse than the wheellock, to the snaphaunce, which was at least useable on horseback, and then to the true flintlock, which was actually a decent cavalry arm.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >it took about a hundred years for flint ignition systems to develop
      You idiot it took about 20 years and 19 of those were just getting the word around

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      what exactly is the difference between the snaplock, snaphaunce and flintlock? the mechanisms look almost exactly the same to me

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