How common is PTSD among veterans? Does it vary from person to person, culture to culture, etc?

How common is PTSD among veterans?

Does it vary from person to person, culture to culture, etc?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Kill a man. find out.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    yeah

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    it varies on the payout levelz you get

    ADF guys can retire for life on PTSD payouts

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have ptsd from watching a person get turned inside out, and I'm not even a vet.
    I imagine it's significantly more common than you'd think.
    It might even be delayed by a decade or even more, so the numbers could be even higher in the future, because it's not like it immediately becomes a problem.
    One day you'll be jerking off, or watching a football game, or playing uno with your niece and then all of a sudden you're just thinking about a person who became paste and then it haunts your dreams for weeks, or months, and starts to effect your life in ways you never thought it could.

    I imagine the true count/frequency will never be known because a bunch of people will just struggle through shit and not talk to anyone about it, not out of any "be a man" bullshit reasons or anything but just because it's a hassle, and that's one less time they need to think about it.
    Also talking to someone about it is a great way to get yourself ERPO'd for no reason.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      gibe greentext

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >be youngin.
        >be wanting to work in a machine shop.
        >find place where I can work on weekends as sort of an apprentice gig in my highschool years
        >really cool place, huuuuge machines to fab custom industrial parts, like 80 ton hydraulic presses and stuff.
        >older guy is teaching me how to use engine lathe.
        >thing has a bed measured in feet, not inches, tremendous capacity.
        >can't even remember what we were turning down, but this dude (early 50s, father of four) is trying to cut it quick so he can split for the day
        >bumps speed up way too quick accidentally, probably double what he wanted
        >Says "FUCK!", rushes, tries to get to controls quick and trips
        >arm goes outward, long sleeve (no-no around machines BTW) catches on workpiece.
        >Pulls him in. It's over very fast. Smashes him into the ways, tool holder, etc. He's gone in a second
        >spins him all over the place at warp speed, pieces go up into the rafters.
        >don't remember what happened after that, I guess I hit the e-stop, the owner came in and found me on my knees sobbing.
        >"come to" in the break room
        >police are there, everyone's saying "hey kid, how you holding up?", lots of pats on the back.
        >haven't been in a shop since.
        >bury it deep down, don't talk about it, still have nightmares years and years later.
        It's a bummer, but I'm doing alright. I have sympathy to the highest degree for people who have to go through the mental bullshit with war zone related causes, I can imagine having to actually shoot a teenager armed with an AK or a bomb vest or something would be even more horrible, because you'd be the catalyst I suppose.
        Sidenote never take safety lightly. Big machinery will kill you lightning quick.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >>be wanting to work in a machine shop.

          got to this part and said to myself "i bet it was a lathe"

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          seen enough of this on /gif/, wouldn't want to witness that shit no matter how old I was

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Post one.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              seems like a close representation to what he saw as a kid originally

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Holy shit! I knew what I was getting into when clicking, but that was gnarly.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Thank you for sharing this. I was having a terrible day and seeing this video brought me back into good spirits. Maybe it's strange, but that man's reaction to seeing his co-worker being spun out of existence by an industrial implement, the way he goes from a panicked sprint into simply lifting his hands up on his head at first in disbelief and then in resignation, just complete and utter "i'm done with this shit" manner of it. I don't know what it was, but it made my soul happy again. Thank you.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I remember lurking the /cvg/ general in 4chan during the peak of Covid and people would just spam all kinds of horrid shit happening to workers in China and start masturbating ogling over the webms like they're in some coomer thread.
            I never thought much about it back then but, Jesus somersaulting Christ, I don't think I wanna watch any of those webms ever again. I don't know what happened to me. I used to watch cartel execution videos and people getting set on fire but now I can't stomach a chink getting OHKO'd in 144p.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Industrial accidents are heavy shit bud. Been there and I know.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    PTSD isn't real.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      hi Patton

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      GOOD

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It varies quite a bit. I was in Iraq and never had any issues. I had a handful of dreams "reliving" different things that happened after I got back but that's it. Wasn't night terrors or anything just straight up like I was there again in my dream.

    From what I noticed it's either: you are constantly afraid 24/7 of getting blown up and killed or you don't really give a shit and get on with your life. After about a week of being shot at/mortared I came to conclusion it was kind of worthless to worry about it. If the vehicle I was in drove over an IED or I got nailed by a mortar/rocket then it is what it is.

    I did what I could to protect myself but at the end of the day I kinda stopped caring. I remember on my last day while I was waiting at the PAX terminal to board the plane out we came under mortar attack. I just stayed sprawled out on the chairs while everyone else was running to the bunkers. It is what it is, everyone deals with it differently.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is a phenomena that the British discovered regarding their combat veterans during WWII. They found out that soldiers constantly exposed to danger became desensitized to them, which led to high casualties amongst veterans in units that don't get cycled from the front-lines.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I told the VA I got PTSD from a mortar attack for the extra percentage gibs

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      smart move to say something they cant prove easily. had a guy in my unit claim hearing loss damage from an equipment test we did and they had a bunch of QA testers come by to take sound readings to prove the tests were not over the threshold for hearing damage.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Its so widely variable that I don't think you can pin it down to just two-three things. At least from what I can deduce from people I served with an know very well is that most of us coming from fairly tough upbringings and being independent early in life seem to deal with stuff better than people from slightly easier, more stress-free backgrounds. Not saying any of us were shanking people for pocket money, but more a case of some single parent households, started part time work in mid teens, lower-mid incomes, rough neighbourhood or agricultural kind of upbringing.
    While I never advocate that as any way for someone to be raised, (god knows I spoil my children so much) but it sort of prepares you to deal with stress internally up to a point and deal with heightened levels of aggression, duress and anxiety. So if we miss a meal or two, a friend dies or we're having to make highly critical decisions quickly its not that much outside our life experiences so far and its sort of why you see a lot of people who come out of foster homes, hard luck stories and broken homes are basically 'fucking tough' fellas.

    I've seen and done some really crazy shit over many tours, but I sort of compartmentalise those times as being specific to just that little period of life and I'm what my psychologist considers extreme-end of anxiety to the point I'm still very highly wired up. But my particular nightmares are around just silly things like being low on ammo, gun stoppage, out of water, getting lost or being late. Its not severely disruptive to my life I guess so I'm not out to claim anything and just rattle on being the complete shambles I am sometimes

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    in the right conditions nearly 100% of combatants are prone to develop PTSD if left in those conditions

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Varies on person. I've seen horrific shit I won't talk about here ever, but personally I'm doing great. That shit was a lifetime ago and even when it was relevant I still distanced myself from it and didn't really care. Why should I?

    PTSD is from an individual, where their brain just dumps cortisol and adrenaline into their brain nonstop until it causes physical brain damage. A defect. Not me, it's fine honestly.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    PTSD is a gibs scam. It was a unkown phenomenon up until people realized they could earn money from it. So for thousands of years you've got humans cutting each other to pieces and ripping intestines out without anyone having panic attacks about it, but some loud bangs and you're telling me a guy becomes disabled?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      1. People back then couldn't dwell on it as much because they had shit to do, and plenty had already experienced significant hardship.
      2. The losing side of the war 'statistically' doesn't suffer as much PTSD in the immediate aftermath because they're being occupied or rebuilding or in POW camps so the data isn't recorded. I'd love to see the NVA psychologists interviewing GIs 5 years into captivity but they were too busy torturing them?
      3. A big point is that in the past the soldiers didn't come home for months and they were all in it together on the ship home working through their problems, as opposed to just flying back home in under 48hrs.
      5. Fighting Napoleon or even the late 1890s colonial wars didn't have the same effect as WW1 because you as an individual soldier weren't subject to years of artillery and concussive forces on your brain. I got diagnosed with a TBI a decade after my last deployment and there are parts of my brain which don't work because it got rocked around in my skull so much. Damaging your brain causes mood disorders including depression and classic PTSD symptoms. It's fixable in the long term thanks to neuroplasticity but it's a long road to recovery and medicine is only figuring out now that a lot of the PTSD crowd have TBIs causing their mood disruptions, not direct experience with trauma. I was a 12B and I got blown up in vehicles 16 times over 3 deployments and had 2 IEDs go off on foot patrols I was on. I never killed anyone and never even saw the enemy at a distance close enough to engage.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >never heard of the lost generation
      Nevermind that there are historical texts dating back to at least the Greeks describing what we would now call “PTSD”. The psychological trauma has always been there, it’s just that now it’s being identified and publicly addressed. Well that and you just being ignorant of history too.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Read a book cunt
      http://www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com/plutarch/marius.htm

      >Perplexed with such thoughts as these, and calling to mind his banishment, and the tedious wanderings and dangers he underwent, both by sea and land, he fell into despondency, nocturnal frights, and unquiet sleep, still fancying that he heard some one telling him, that
      >the lion's lair
      >Is dangerous, though the lion be not there.
      >Above all things fearing to lie awake, he gave himself up to drinking deep and besotting himself at night in a way most unsuitable to his age; by all means provoking sleep, as a diversion to his thoughts

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Single events rarely cause PTSD if the person experiencing the event is allowed to deal with it, and doesn't have additional stress immediately after forcing them to put off processing it.

    The kind of thing that almost always causes PTSD is continuous trauma. Continual exposure to fucked up shit, not being allowed rest from the danger. War puts many people in that sort of situation.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the suffering of others is none of my concern.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    only common for gay ass americans cuz they're all weak gays

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on the individual and the situation. My best friend was one of the Marines securing the airport in Kabul when the bomb went off, he's got pretty bad PTSD from the whole thing and he's tough as nails.
    >babies crying because people are trying to hand them to the Marines through barb wire
    >the Taliban watching you through the fence and pointing at their watch to remind you "time is running out"
    >people getting stabbed while trying to force their way to the front
    Those are just some of the tidbits he told me

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I dunno. Like I don't lay awake thinking about stuff at night. But sometimes I'll just be chillin' and the helicopter that I watch crash at 29 Palms will just pop into my head. Or the sound. When the blades flew off on impact it sounded like when you flick and long steel cable, like the ones the hold up the door to a box trailer with a ramp, idk how else to describe it.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Only common among pussies.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's heavily culturally dependent. PTSD-like symptoms have shown up in all wars, back to the ancient Greeks, but the frequency of them is a modern meme.

    I believe this is part modern technology and part culture. Prolonged inability to react to a situation is more common in modern war. Blast injuries are also contributors, as are larpers/pogues grifting the system.

    But mostly I blame modern western 'culture' for lacking the ability to contextualize violence.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *