Hey?

Hey PrepHole I'm getting my first set of cordless tools for my home workshop (starting with a cordless drill). I realize that once I lock in a type of cordless tool, I'll want to ensure I stick with the same brand so the batteries will all be compatible. What brand of cordless tools does PrepHole reccommend? I use DeWalt at work, and they're okay but I've noticed that sometimes they don't have enough torque for even regular stuff like deck screws.

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >cordless tools
    >home workshop

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      My property is too large to use corded tools for every job. Sorry that you cannot relate.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >home workshop
        >miles away from your home
        i use gas powered tools on my lawn and vast acreage
        corded tools in my home workshop
        air tools in my garage and driveway

        cordless tools are for women and diy dad home depot cucksoomers
        the crew that built my house had a generator and compressor so they could use real tools
        cordless drill/driver combo are good to have though for convenience sake
        the only difference you'll notice between brands is the color so get one to match your nail polish and panties and you'll be fine

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Boomerautist detected. Battery life has been fine for a while (I still have one usable 2011 Milwaukee battery), the cost is trivial for firsties who can afford homes, and dragging cords which I also do is often annoying indoors.

      I've corded, cordless, pneumatic and manual tools aplenty. Horses for courses. It's not 2002 any more.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        corded tools are cheaper, last longer, are way more powerful, and you have many times more options available. i'm feeling generous so let me know which one of those you disagree with and i will tell you exactly why you're wrong.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I use Ryobi because they're cheap and with few exceptions you can do anything with them. Why spend more than you need to?

    There are others who say that you should buy the best (and most expensive) thing off the bat because it will end up saving you money in the long run. I don't relate to this advice at all. My Ryobi tools, treated well, have lasted years, so I can't tell you when I might hypothetically come to regret my decision.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      After doing my research I came a few options.
      A. I got money or plan to do a lot of work = Bosch Pro series (the blue ones)
      B. I don't got money or only do a few small jobs = Hercules (but buy the bits and blades someplace else)
      C. I am going industrial ... (need to do research on air powered tools)
      D. I want to fit in. Pick Dewalt or Milwaukee based on which crazy fans you like more (May differ in other regions, I don't know where you are)

      I use to think I'd save money getting the best tool, but then I looked at how often I used them and quickly realized I the old saying was right. Buy cheap then replace with quality. If you don't wear out the cheap stuff then you didn't need it enough to buy the nice one.

      https://i.imgur.com/wOAKkCA.jpg

      >cordless tools
      >home workshop

      Sadly I had trouble finding corded tools, the few I did find were no name trash. If you know of a decent corded collection let me know.

      >home workshop
      >miles away from your home
      i use gas powered tools on my lawn and vast acreage
      corded tools in my home workshop
      air tools in my garage and driveway

      cordless tools are for women and diy dad home depot cucksoomers
      the crew that built my house had a generator and compressor so they could use real tools
      cordless drill/driver combo are good to have though for convenience sake
      the only difference you'll notice between brands is the color so get one to match your nail polish and panties and you'll be fine

      Thanks for the idea, I totally over looked air powered tools, but historically they are good. Will need to look into that.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Buy cheap then replace with quality. If you don't wear out the cheap stuff then you didn't need it enough to buy the nice one.
        This is a great middle-ground, and what I have done

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          the only issue is having to buy into another battery platform when you could have just bought it from the start

          For me, there's a Lowe's and a Home Depot near me so I bought into a brand that has power tools and batteries available at both stores so I can take advantage of sales, bogos, etc. at both stores

          Lowe's doesnt have Milwaukee, Ridgid, Ryobi, Makita, Hilti
          Home Depot doesn't have Craftsman, Kobalt, Metabo, Flex, Bosch (batteries)

          so that leaves Dewalt, Black+Decker, Porter-Cable, Skil tools and batteries available at both stores
          so naturally I chose Dewalt going by this criteria

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >the only issue is having to buy into another battery platform when you could have just bought it from the start
            It isn't like your old tools evaporated. You can keep them as backup, give them to a friend or relative (who WILL be grateful), sell them online, or donate them to charity.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That is an interesting system and I can't really fault you deeply for it. One thing to point out is that DeWalt won't have as many deals as, say, Ryobi and Husky due to lacking an exclusivity agreement. The deals this summer on those aforementioned brands have been unreal, you wouldn't even know we're in a recession. I have practically filled up a brand new empty workshop for under $1000.

            As for battery platforms, Ryobi has done the best job with theirs. It's really easy to browse around looking for the ONE+ logo and know that you have the batteries for it. All my cordless tools are ONE+, and if I need more power I go corded, but your needs may vary.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >>the only issue is having to buy into another battery platform when you could have just bought it from the start

            I solve that by not caring and buying whatever I feel like since given my use rate tools pay for themselves swiftly. I've old Milwaukee 28V (before the buyout quality was glorious), recent DeWalt (avoid the chain saws) and Makita (excellent, I've never had a bad Makita tool).

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Sadly I had trouble finding corded tools, the few I did find were no name trash. If you know of a decent corded collection let me know.
        what tools are you looking for? you don't need to buy a 'collection' with corded tools as there are no batteries to share. ie need a circ saw? skilsaw. sawzall? milwaukee. angle grinder? bosch. trim router? makita. etc

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The key tool was a nice mid level drill, preferably smaller for easy of holding and tight spaces but power enough it can drill into hard wood. The ones I see are either massive showing off how that can drill stuff like 4" in solid rock (fear they'd break the work piece and would get tiring to hold for a long time) or are cheap no name stuff (I wouldn't trust).

          One big project I have planned in the future is drilling in thousands of woods screws in plywood across the floor. I did a smaller version with a few hundred screws and was changing batteries on an old RIGID set and letting the drill cool down, it worked but stopping every 50 screws or so would get annoying. Given the scale I might want to see if there job specific tool is like a tiny drill press that I can drive 2" past the base into the floor so I don't have to re-level the guide each time.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you need to drill thousands of screws, this sounds like the job for a senco screw gun. In this situation where you will be in one spot you could go corded to save some $$$.

            Belt fed screw guns are fucking good for this.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              That does seem like it is worth the extra money just for making this one project go a lot faster. But I got some deeper personal problems in this project, already got custom screws for the project given I optimized the thread spacing, pitch and alloy for the task (my floor isn't going to squeak ever when I am done). Will need to see if they sell empty belts you can load with your own screws, which I doubt given how many people call me crazy.

              https://i.imgur.com/Rk4nqvJ.jpg

              >a nice mid level drill, preferably smaller for easy of holding and tight spaces but power enough it can drill into hard wood
              i am once again shilling the milwaukee m12 installation driver, my absolute favorite tool i've ever held. pricy, and puts you in milwaukee's 12V line which will soon have you yearning for 18V, but goddamn is it so fucking handy.

              apparently other tool lines make multi-head drivers like this too, but i can personally speak for the quality (and power) of this one. drives tapcons.

              Neat, I was waiting to hear more about these multi drill/drivers. I love the idea but wanted to see how they worked before investing. They all are about the same with only minor differences after watching some brand reviews, but given I see Bosch as a leader I'll think about skipping Hercules and just getting theirs from the start as a good drill is one of the two tools I must have for nearly any job and I am not doing anything crazy.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >custom made screws, by the thousand

                oh shit its a troll thread.

                >everyone PACK IT UP!!! OP'S sucking dick commercially again.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >a nice mid level drill, preferably smaller for easy of holding and tight spaces but power enough it can drill into hard wood
            i am once again shilling the milwaukee m12 installation driver, my absolute favorite tool i've ever held. pricy, and puts you in milwaukee's 12V line which will soon have you yearning for 18V, but goddamn is it so fucking handy.

            apparently other tool lines make multi-head drivers like this too, but i can personally speak for the quality (and power) of this one. drives tapcons.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              oh, also recently needed to burn out a tree stump, so stuck a 1/2" foot-long auger bit on it and it tore that shit up. this was with the tiniest battery pack, i don't even own any of the larger capacity battery packs (which, despite on paper being only an increase in capacity, will absolutely increase the power of any given tool due to the different cells and different cell parallelization)

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              oh, also recently needed to burn out a tree stump, so stuck a 1/2" foot-long auger bit on it and it tore that shit up. this was with the tiniest battery pack, i don't even own any of the larger capacity battery packs (which, despite on paper being only an increase in capacity, will absolutely increase the power of any given tool due to the different cells and different cell parallelization)

              https://www.toolboxbuzz.com/cordless-tools/drilldriver/best-12v-cordless-multi-head-drill-driver/

              end of my shilling. will just repeat that this tool is a joy to use and as a homeowner i'm grabbing it constantly, and over and over i find myself in the middle of using it and thinking "jesus this job would have been such a fucking pain in the ass if I didn't have this thing"

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The go-to brands are Ryobi, Ridgid if you want to save money and get 70-80% of what you get in the "standard" range, and the "standard" range is Makita, Dewalt, Milwaukee, they have more or less equivalent quality and a big selection of tools. They all have high torque/high end drill variants that go up to ~150Nm fastening torque, which is a whole lot for a drill, even 60Nm in their standard drills is a good force. Bosch pro is about the same as these, except a much smaller selection of tools, potentially overpriced along with Milwaukee.
        Some brands are "compatible" with battery adapters from other brands, most Ryobi and Makita and I think DeWalt 20V, but the more high end ones tend to digitally lock their batteries to only work with their own brand of tools.
        Some of the brands also have 40V platform, but that's only really needed for big tools, angle grinders, bush cutters, demolition drills and such.
        Also don't listen to retards telling you to buy pneumatic tools for homeowner shit, you can't run any half-serious pneumatic tool off an el cheapo Home Depot compressor, you need big-ass compressor on three phase, and you can guess how easy it is to move them around or lug the hoses around if you need the impact wrench somewhere more than 15m away from your workshop.
        On the other hand, it's better to have 5 different tools corded than 1 cordless, so if you don't plan to spend too much, stick more to corded. Definitely get a cordless drill though.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've seen Aging Wheels use nothing but Ryobi impacts for two years on automotive work. If they're holding up there, they're probably fine.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ridgid, or rigid. However the fuck its spelled, either way go orange. They give free replacement batteries as they die. They work very well too.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    either dewalt or milwaukee 18v/20v systems will be fine. i personally go for dewalt but thats because they're a tiny bit more american, and milwaukee charges a premium above dewalt.
    also i think dewalt is just more advanced with the batteries, multi battery fast chargers, 60v/120v working with 20v, and also the portable power station thing.
    any 20v system will work really, but consider how expansive the tool selection is with the milwaukee and dewalt systems.

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