>Guedelon has completed a second tower

>Guedelon has completed a second tower

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

LifeStraw Water Filter for Hiking and Preparedness

250 Piece Survival Gear First Aid Kit

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    can they endure a drone hit?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the walls are thick

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The walls are strong my lord
        >Grad will breach it!

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Unironically yes

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Depends on the drone

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Uhh...probably? Those walls are pretty thick so as long as the Hellfire doesn't hit them square on I'd say the walls will hold.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Probably. Krak des Chevaliers was used during the Syrian civil war and held up well against hits from both artillery and bomber aircraft.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        This reminds me of something actually
        >read history
        >every history textbook says that after the use of gunpowder cannons, castles became obsolete as the gunpowder weapons could shatter any static defences
        >castles switched from being defensive installations to purely aesthetic luxury homes for the rich
        >look at real life
        >there were forts and castles which could be built with late medieval and early modern technology which were impervious to gunpowder weapons (see star forts)
        >??????
        which is it anons, why didn't euros just start making nothing but WW1 style bunker castles and why did they instead opt to build all these dope luxury castles instead?
        shows that even crusade era castles can reasonably withstand modern munitions, the frick?

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Star forts aren't castles.
          The better artillery got, the lower fortifications became. Six-floor keeps and towers on the tops of hills were obsolete, but autistic Germans kept building them because they thought they looked cool.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            so how do you explain

            https://i.imgur.com/eGxW7Q1.jpeg

            Probably. Krak des Chevaliers was used during the Syrian Civil War and held up well against hits from both artillery and bomber aircraft.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              1) thirdies
              2) arabs (redundant I know)
              Industrialized powers were destroying fortifications like that in an afternoon, all the way back during the first world war. The fact that some literal 80-IQ sand people couldn't level the place with a single artillery piece making occasional pot shots doesn't speak to the effectiveness of medieval castles in modern conflict.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          see picrel? most castles are actually kind of small. the big ones were extremely expensive to build.

          around the 15th century cannon became effective siege artillery if not field artillery, castles had a massive fall off in cost effectiveness and sieges became rarer because everyone knew the outcome was more or less inevitable. cannon was lots more effective than all the other siege engines; engineers had to spend more on fortifications to make the castle hold out the same vs cannons as against trebuchets. the juice became significantly less worth the squeeze.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            I appreciate the rimworld aesthetic

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            That drawing is incomplete, as is the surviving building. Such a tower house would've had a wall around it, with a gatehouse and one or two auxiliary buildings in a small courtyard.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              >Such a tower house would've had a wall around it, with a gatehouse and one or two auxiliary buildings in a small courtyard.
              made of wood? maybe
              made of stone? no

              a towerhouse is a budget version of what many people think of as a castle, and what you see here is all there is

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >"Item, it is statute and ordained for the safety of men, their goods and gear upon the borders in time of war and all other troublesome times, that every landed man dwelling in the inland or upon the borders having there a hundred pound land of new extent *shall build a sufficient barmkin* upon his heritage and lands in the most suitable place, *of stone and lime*, containing three score foot of the square, one ell thick and six ells high, for the protection and defence of him, his tenants and their goods in troublesome times, *with a tower in the same for himself if he thinks it expedient*, and that all other landed men of smaller rent and revenue build palisades and great strengths as they please for the safety of themselves, men, tenants and goods, and that all the said strengths, barmkins and palisades be built and completed within two years under the pain."
                Parliamentary Act, June 12, 1535. Since the owner built a tower, he was mandated by law to have a barmkin (a stone wall) around it.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                but many of these towerhouses don't have remnants of walls around them

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                Many walls got taken apart for materials, once the reaver era had passed. Pre-cut stone is a lot more valuable than a bunch of boulders sitting in a quarry.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Part of the reason that Verdun got so messy was that French leadership noted that their forts were all built before the advent of indirect fire artillery and didn't think they would be able to hold up to modern day bombardment. So when the Germans accidentally captured Douaumont, the French were okay with it, and purposely let them mass inside before unleashing a barrage that was completely absorbed by the fort. Turns out they still worked.
          It took another year of bombardment and hundreds of thousands of casualties to retake it, and even then the French only succeeded because some moron tried to heat a cup of coffee with a flamethrower and accidentally lit the munitions arsenal on fire, blowing up the fort from the inside.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            >some moron tried to heat a cup of coffee with a flamethrower and accidentally lit the munitions arsenal on fire
            jej, that's crazy, got a source?

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              wikipedia 'Fort Douamont'
              also:

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >crusade era castles can reasonably withstand modern munitions
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallboy_(bomb)
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Slam_(bomb)
          meanwhile, in WWII

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Star forts aren't castles.
          The better artillery got, the lower fortifications became. Six-floor keeps and towers on the tops of hills were obsolete, but autistic Germans kept building them because they thought they looked cool.

          1) thirdies
          2) arabs (redundant I know)
          Industrialized powers were destroying fortifications like that in an afternoon, all the way back during the first world war. The fact that some literal 80-IQ sand people couldn't level the place with a single artillery piece making occasional pot shots doesn't speak to the effectiveness of medieval castles in modern conflict.

          https://i.imgur.com/191ZW9o.jpeg

          Part of the reason that Verdun got so messy was that French leadership noted that their forts were all built before the advent of indirect fire artillery and didn't think they would be able to hold up to modern day bombardment. So when the Germans accidentally captured Douaumont, the French were okay with it, and purposely let them mass inside before unleashing a barrage that was completely absorbed by the fort. Turns out they still worked.
          It took another year of bombardment and hundreds of thousands of casualties to retake it, and even then the French only succeeded because some moron tried to heat a cup of coffee with a flamethrower and accidentally lit the munitions arsenal on fire, blowing up the fort from the inside.

          thank you anons this was very instructive
          A follow-up: How relevant are douaumont-style fortifications in modern warfare? I would assume that NATO maneuver warfare doctrine would render them completely obsolete, but then again looking at ukraine it almost seems like they'd be useful.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            A fortified position is never obsolete, as long as you have the weapons to prevent the enemy from dropping a weapon large enough (See: Massive Ordnance Penetrator) to crack it.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >Krak

        so how do you explain [...]

        Krak is pretty fricked up

        sigh
        yet another fricking landmark I'm never going to visit now because of fricking Ayrabs
        >always wanted to see the WTC as a boy

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Sad isn't it. But nothing lasts forever.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          wanted to see the WTC as a boy
          There's arguably more to see there now for tourists than before. Before they were primarily business space being rented out. The old photographs do have something though, the towers just dominated the skyline, while the new one blends in.

          .t works in walking distance.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        seems like sheltering in old castles was more common in the scw than i thought. were there any other fortifications repurposed in this way besides Krak and the Citadel of Aleppo?

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It would be faster in reality due to serfs and labours being more plentiful, right?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      skilled crafts would have been more plentiful back then unlike today where volunteers have to learn, but you would have had to pay them unlike volunteers
      your serfs didn't just work endlessly for you they had a set amount of owed labor and after you'd expended that for the year you'd then have to pay them, and you would want them to be working your fields aside form building this
      so it is mixed
      a lot of times these things weren't scratch built but done in stages - first you built a manor out of wood, then a palisade, then a stone tower, then other structures, then replace the palisade with a wall and a new stone manor

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous
      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You cant just have peasants make a castle just like you cant make peasants churn out swords: the end result is a waste of resources. You need skilled stonemasons who know how to stack and cut stones. Peasants can make rock walls and foundations for smaller buildings and thats about it before you meed a bit of architectural training.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I remember watching the video about how they shaped rocks to specifically fit doorways and windows. Fun stuff.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No. Stuff used to take literal generations to build. Bridges, castles, walls, pyramids, churches used to take 50 to hundreds of years to build. Sons would take over from their fathers and continue the work.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Many castles were built in 2-3 years. Nearly all were completed in under 10. Cathedrals were a larger and far more complex investment.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        An xbox hueg structure like a Cathedral or Pyramid would take decades.
        But a manor like this would not, look at the dates here

        https://i.imgur.com/aqSDEtk.png

        skilled crafts would have been more plentiful back then unlike today where volunteers have to learn, but you would have had to pay them unlike volunteers
        your serfs didn't just work endlessly for you they had a set amount of owed labor and after you'd expended that for the year you'd then have to pay them, and you would want them to be working your fields aside form building this
        so it is mixed
        a lot of times these things weren't scratch built but done in stages - first you built a manor out of wood, then a palisade, then a stone tower, then other structures, then replace the palisade with a wall and a new stone manor

        One of the reasons was work would be seasonal not year round, people would have to stop for farming (also why conflicts would drag out for years and decades)
        The Pyramids for example were only worked on during the time of the year the Nile delta was flooded leaving the farmers with nothing else to do.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >One of the reasons was work would be seasonal not year round, people would have to stop for farming (also why conflicts would drag out for years and decades)
          Additionally many things couldn't be built in winter either.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Winter in egypt?

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Egypt?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Stuff used to take literal generations to build.....churches used to take 50 to hundreds of years to build.

        This was not due to labour, craftsmanship, or material issues. It was about paying everyone to keep working and finish. Construction on many churches, especially the big fancy churches, began with no where near enough funds to see the project to completion. Work would start, stop, fall into disrepair, and then pick up when the next rich patron got a Virgin Mary dream. Construction on the Milan el Duomo began in 1386 and was finished in 1805 ONLY because Napoleon became king of italy and promised to pay. Before that there were plans but no one was working. Napoleon never ended up paying kek.

        We have a French Manlet to thank for the existence of Anor Londo.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Italian tradesmen
          >not working
          the celestial balet goes on

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          this, there are several prominent ecclesiastical and secular buildings in my city build in a hodge podge of different styles.
          The cycle behind them goes a bit like this:
          trade is good, money is flowing in start building shit
          city is productive the guilds are all working towards a common goal fo once (building shit together) internal political bickering stops so they feel STRONK, rebel, get crushed
          have to pay indemnities, work stops
          rinse and repeat

          It's actually pretty important in teaching new engineers and builders how to maintain France's myriad of historical structures.

          I've spoken with some off them
          I'm a amateur stained glass "artist" and while Guedelon doesn't have much glass work a lot of the people into restoration go and help in the summer

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >It was about paying everyone to keep working and finish.
          I seem to remember reading that workers for the Pyramids were a kind of "taxation as labor" since due to the nature of the Nile's flooding cycle the farmers of Ancient Egypt had a whole chunk of the year in which they effectively had nothing to do, and people have nothing to do have time to ask funny questions like "why do we give so much of our harvest to the man in the funny hat? Does he really make the sun come up?".

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            IIRC they were pretty much professionals.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            the rulers of just about every civilisation the whole world over have used manual labour as a form of taxation in kind, because monetary systems need advanced and stable societies to function effectively
            nobody had "effectively nothing to do" in those days, there was always something to do. building prestige shit however unironically boosts morale and impresses enemies, that's not just Civ vidya shit

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >We have a French Manlet to thank for the existence of Anor Londo.
          Lmao

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          mere 420 years to finish?
          Scrub.

          https://i.imgur.com/Fvtex3y.jpeg

          Great to see!

          Isn't that a bit much for a manor house? Or to put it differently: the living quarters seem disproportionally small in contrast to the defensive structures.

          Kinda would like to see this for bergfrit disposition

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          >manlet
          he was 5'8

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        A pyramid had to be built within the lifetime of the pharaoh for whom it was intended to be a tomb. So it might take a couple decades, but it couldn't take lifetimes, by design.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it would be faster due to the people at the time being familiar with their own tools.
      Main reason for it taking so long is that they're all unpaid volunteers who have to carefully figure out beforehand what tools they can and cannot use, and then learning how to use the specified tools. It's made a bit worse by the fact some of the tools used back in the day that could've speedened up the project are lost in time.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sort of? You generally didn't move serfs in until you had a castle and frankly most nobles were kicking the serfs out for livestock. The real issue is that you need Masons, a skilled labor position, to build a castle and all the unskilled serfs and laborers in the world aren't going to replace that.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Depends, if this was a literal who's castle they may only be able to find a half dozen masons capable of building castles, which would result in a similar timeframe to this.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's been going at 40-60% speed during various stages because they've been intensely documenting it, and having shows of the building of the stages
      the project isn't just about building it, it's also about why things were built that way
      we literally don't know why certain systems of construction were used instead of others
      depending on the exact thing, there are competing theories ranging from the obvious tradition or cost to ones like worker safety or just reliability (e.g. type of a pulley "breaks well" or just never breaks, even if it is otherwise an objectively shittier type of pulley)

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >It would be faster in reality due to serfs and labours being more plentiful, right?
      if it was high priority project and you threw a whole Roman legion at the problem

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on the money and influence of the lord (specialised workers were in high demand, especially during the height of the cathedral building craze).
      Chateau-Gaillard was completed in 2 fricking years, but it's something of an extreme case with Richard the Lionheart going all out.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is what it is supposed to look like upon completion

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      After it's finished the should test it by throwing boulders at it witha trebuchet

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wonder if it will be used in movies. A lot of people say a lot of the castles in movies are inaccurate because they were refurbished improperly.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The main issue is I see is the walls are often bare, when they should be whitewashed and painted with floral designs

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          this. even poorgays decorated and painted their houses

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            correct this is a wattle and daub hut on the work site
            with a history qt3.14

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >wearing glasses
              My immersion is willing to accommodate medieval meganeko fetish.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                My reasoning is that if old timey people would have been cool with it (and since good taste is eternal we can safely assume they would be) then I'm cool with it also

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Guedelon is a recreation of a 13th century castle; eyeglasses as we know them date from the late 13th century.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Guedelon is a recreation of a 13th century castle; eyeglasses as we know them date from the late 13th century.

                Medieval glasses were more like clamps with lenses you attached to the bridge of your nose.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                They used a length of twine that went around your head similar to the way temples are used on modern glasses.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >history qt3.14
              do French medieval larpers frick good?
              does Guedelon have a historically-accurate village prostitute?
              did they deepthroat in medieval times?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >did they deepthroat in the middle ages
                Look, there's an entire medieval French ballad that revolves around a sexually frustrated manor wife hatching an elaborate ruse whose punchline involves kicking her husband's ass while crossdressing as a man and convincing said husband (who has never seen a vegana) that she has the longest butthole in the world so he'll finally eat her out. There is some unbelievably filthy and hilarious poetry out there, they just don't show it to the sophomores.

                >do they frick good
                If they're anything like every other historical re-enactment group I've ever seen, then the ones who are down are at least extremely enthusiastic about it.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >sexually frustrated manor wife hatching an elaborate ruse whose punchline involves kicking her husband's ass while crossdressing as a man and convincing said husband (who has never seen a vegana) that she has the longest butthole in the world so he'll finally eat her out
                what a pity we don't learn more about the sex comedies of the 14th century

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >there's an entire medieval French ballad that revolves around a sexually frustrated manor wife hatching an elaborate ruse whose punchline involves kicking her husband's ass while crossdressing as a man and convincing said husband (who has never seen a vegana) that she has the longest butthole in the world so he'll finally eat her out.
                Imma gonna need a sauce.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                "Berengier au lonc cul", or Barry Long-ass. There's an entire genre called fables/fabliau that are basically a really filthy shaggy-dog story. Long, meandering narratives about not much, filled with improvised puns, dirty jokes, and depending on the performer some physical humor to make the puns more obvious. Think Shakespeare's classic
                >I swear by the thighs, and that which nearby lies
                joke but with more of Romeo's friends air-humping and high-fiving. Many of the punchlines in medieval literature are essentially "If you don't frick your wife good you're a gay, you WILL be cucked, and everyone will tell you your penis is small".

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                There's a similar story in Canterbury Tales where long story short, Chad is cucking some virgin homosexual priest and tricks said turbovirgin into kissing his butthole because the virgin thinks Stacy is sticking her lips out to give him a kiss out the window one night.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Thanks a bunch.

                There's a similar story in Canterbury Tales where long story short, Chad is cucking some virgin homosexual priest and tricks said turbovirgin into kissing his butthole because the virgin thinks Stacy is sticking her lips out to give him a kiss out the window one night.

                Doesn't said Chad get a hot poker stuck into his ass next time in the same tale?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You win some, you lose some

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >There's an entire genre called fables/fabliau that are basically a really filthy shaggy-dog story. Long, meandering narratives about not much, filled with improvised puns, dirty jokes, and depending on the performer some physical humor to make the puns more obvious
                Cool.
                >When the knight restores the clothing and the maidens dress themselves, they give him three gifts. The first gives him the power to entertain anyone and get paid for it. The second gives him the power to hear veganas speak if he addresses them. The third adds to that power: if a vegana is prevented from speaking, the anus will respond for it
                I don't get it.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Hes gonna frick a lot of women and also gets the anal loophole

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >If they're anything like every other historical re-enactment group I've ever seen, then the ones who are down are at least extremely enthusiastic about it.
                I went to Boston with my mom a few years ago and walked the freedom trail. We went into the old meeting house, where the attendants dress up as puritans, and this suprisingly qt female tour guide came up to us to talk. My mom started asking questions about how strict the puritans were and the tour guide went off on this tangent about how good they used to frick back in the day because they believed a woman needed to orgasm in order to get pregnant, and how Ben Franklin invented eating pussy. Completely caught me off guard.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >and how Ben Franklin invented eating pussy.
                Ben may had been based but God damn was that man a deviant of the highest order

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Ben also talked about loving older women because they knew what they were doing and fricking wild in bed. Franklin was a real redblooded American before it was cool.

                I don't see anything that contradicts him being based.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Ben Franklin invented eating pussy
                what a polymath
                truly the da Vinci of his time

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Ben also talked about loving older women because they knew what they were doing and fricking wild in bed. Franklin was a real redblooded American before it was cool.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You did frick her, right?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You think I can make a woman orgasm? She probably goes to bed jamming her clam to the Scarlet Letter, I can't compete with that...

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Good ol'Benjamin, god damn our founders were Chads

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >a woman needed to orgasm in order to get pregnant
                This was also a defence in rape cases; if a rape victim became pregnant as a result of the rape, she must have enjoyed it, and therefore it wasn't rape.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >Puritans not just hanging you for fricking a woman in an alley, consensually or not
                >Puritans punishing marital rape
                Not a chance this is true

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                Fornication has never been a capital crime, rape was, but it was generally medically accepted, until the early 19th century, that conception required enjoyment or orgasm from the woman. There was no such thing as marital rape, at least in English law, until 1991.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                punishing marital rape
                I don't know man, they'd throw you in jail for a day or two just for cussing at your wife. If things got physical like that, they might very well kill you.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >tfw no Puritan waifu who's faithful to God and crazy in bed
                how does one cope with this?

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                I found one such irl. Sadly they are as unstable as flimsy jar of nitroglycerin in a back of quad bike going fullspeed cross terrain

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >unstable
                how?

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                Not suited for modern life. The moment she left her homeschooling lifestyle and the local parish group she just couldn't handle the regular life all other normies lead and became rather nutty.
                Deep down there was that unbreaking faithfulness to god still and she was a massive degen in bed. But outside of that a completely unstable wreck that couldn't handle anything and just resorted to attempting on praying all her problems away

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I think they're starting to do that in some of the rooms. I think I saw it in a video but I'm to tired and lazy to look it up right now.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I think they're starting to do that in some of the rooms
            well obviously I posted a picture of it

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I think they're starting to do that in some of the rooms. I think I saw it in a video but I'm to tired and lazy to look it up right now.
            It's an entire episode of the BBC series ("Building the Castle"), and they go to a local church for research to show off its wall paintings. Most of the series is them working on the steps and the chapel halfway up the second tower.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          this. even poorgays decorated and painted their houses

          This. Some fresco from my recent visit to Pompeii

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Great to see!

      Isn't that a bit much for a manor house? Or to put it differently: the living quarters seem disproportionally small in contrast to the defensive structures.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Isn't that a bit much for a manor house? Or to put it differently: the living quarters seem disproportionally small in contrast to the defensive structures.
        It all depends on the goal of the castle and the area. In important, conflict prone, area's even a small castle would focus extra on the defenses.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/w7Ynmya.png

        >Isn't that a bit much for a manor house? Or to put it differently: the living quarters seem disproportionally small in contrast to the defensive structures.
        It all depends on the goal of the castle and the area. In important, conflict prone, area's even a small castle would focus extra on the defenses.

        They are making Guedelon along with a "story" contextualizing the castle as if it was made back then.
        From memory, there was a bit like the noble participating in a war and get rewarded in exchange.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        What happened between 1428 and 1535?

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Earthquake knocked it down and rebuilt as star fort.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            That's a shame, where is this located?

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              Page 1, now.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Gunpowder weapons went from meme to meta

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        For me it's 980

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          soul

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    911AD waseth an inner side job

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you're gonna do this do it properly, something like the White Ship Disaster or Richard III at Bosworth

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yea; for mere coals melteth not oaken beams

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Sir, a second tower has been constructed

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      HAHAHAHAHA

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Larp: The Castle.

    for those who, as kids, had their sandcastles stomped and never recovered from the trauma.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      frick off newbie building a castle irl is peaky /k/omfy

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous
    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's actually pretty important in teaching new engineers and builders how to maintain France's myriad of historical structures.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Notre-Dame reconstruction is being led by people who worked on Guedelon

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          God bless 'em.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Indeed. They basically got drafted by that general that got put in charge, around the same time he threw out all the avant garde gays who wanted to turn Notre Dame into a Starbucks.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Im so fricking relieved that happened, this life is already cursed enough as is.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That's cool; I didn't know that. I just remember the initial plans which sounded like they were intended to de-Christianize the cathedral.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            they fricking tried, then sanity took hold for once and people realized how utterly stupid it was

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            they fricking tried, then sanity took hold for once and people realized how utterly stupid it was

            Notre Dame haven't belonged to a cultist organization since forever.
            It's just another touristic monument where we let the cultist provide free animation.
            The only subject of controversy was whether to change the spire design.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              Didn't know Notre Dame was a synagogue.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              have a nice day.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              You do realize you're basically giving the Vatican free money right

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                Given the tourism it attracts, the Vatican is more like useful bacteria.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >t. bully

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      We get it, you're a thirdie with no history worth preserving or maintaining.
      Cope more.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It looks incredible but I always thought the tower to wall ratio was a bit high.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      why wouldn't there be a tower at each corner?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think he means the distance between the towers is too short. They could have stretched the walls and had more space inside.
        I'm no historian but I'm guessing you'd want a garrison of like 30-50 men. Plus women and children, that's a lot of people. I wonder how long it could really withstand a siege with such limited space to store supplies for so many people.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >stretch the walls out
          more cost
          >you'd want a garrison of like 30-50 men
          this isn't a base it is a local lords manor
          >I wonder how long it could really withstand a siege with such limited space to store supplies for so many people.
          I dont know if they built it for this but historically there should be a cellar.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          It's more the medieval equivalent of a fortified McMansion than a strictly military building. More internal space requires more men to defend it for no particular benefit. The castle had to accommodate the family (and usually several other people) already so stretching supplies by adding unnecessary extra frontage to defend wasn't optimal.
          The point of a medieval castle was basically to make a small defending force as effective as possible at holding the position.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's the two extras in the middle that get me.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          that is the gate house

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            And it results in a very high tower to wall ratio.

            • 1 week ago
              Anonymous

              Towers are better than walls, they'd make the entire castle towers if they could.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    good work!

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why white people are wasting their time on this?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      We have a lot of spare time here because we don't have to carry water five miles from the nearest well.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You would not understand.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Should be Old Bay

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Its just a white people thing I wouldn't worry about it

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Education and research. Occasionally you can use ancient methods as inspiration for new technology. For example, there's no rule saying you can't run a quernstone off a power drill.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous
  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >defensive towers
    Foolish mistake. Better to save the stone for either a second TC as soon as you hit castle age or, if you've been mining stone anyway on your way up, an immediate castle drop in your opponent's face.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Based frogs. So what you want about them, but they often have good vision for big projects. I can't imagine the daybarkul of UK's HS2 happening there.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Guedelon is a private project that runs on volunteers. French government projects are another matter entirely
      >The French government pisses off a 50 man glassblowers union
      >Half of France stops working in solidarity.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The French government pisses off a 50 man glassblowers union
        >Half of France stops working in solidarity.
        wait what?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          we love our grèves, don't fricking try us, we WILL march through your city's main street every saturday for a few months screaming that Macron is a devil

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            For how much of an insufferable gay almost every french speaking person I've met has been (the exception being some guys from the DRC, they were really nice and just happy that some butthole wasn't shoving an AK into their hands and forcing them to march) I do admire how little shit you lads are willing to take from your government before you go out to remind them that there's still some guillotines lying around.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              chicken and egg. French people protest because they can't get shit done the proper way; they can't get shit done the proper way because they're busy fricking each other up. it's just a nationful of BLMers. from top to bottom nobody just sits down and gets the job done any more.

              • 1 week ago
                Anonymous

                >French people protest because they can't get shit done the proper way
                They seem to get a lot done just fine actually.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            OK but could you do it in places politicians actually live?
            It was so strange seeing farmers block our small city like it was going to achieve anything

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah but your strikes never achieve anything.You riot for a while and the government just does it anyway.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              OK but could you do it in places politicians actually live?
              It was so strange seeing farmers block our small city like it was going to achieve anything

              irrelevant, let's also carry horns and drums to make sure and be as loud as possible

              Yes
              Farmers do be getting angry, but there's only so many times you can dump eggs and manure in front of government buildings and expect a reaction out of them

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yes, I know that but I haven't read anything about a glassblowers union triggering a national strike.
            t- étranger qui lit la presse française

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >society working together to help one another is bad

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          working together to help one another is bad
          >working
          They weren't working, that's kind of the point. Dumbass.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They're contributing more than most white collars

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              try running those trains without accountants, engineers, signal system designers...

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >They weren't working
            Yes they are, just in another way.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds like a typical continental Tuesday innit?

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >nomadic horse raiders hate this one simple trick!

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cool. Wonder what they'll do when the castle is finished

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      restore the ancien régime

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maintain it, and host ren faires or whatever the frick the baguette version of that is

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I asked this question when I volunteered out there, at the time they were thinking of maybe building a cathedral to match. Their involvement in Notre Dame might be scratching that itch though.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    kino series about guedelon:

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is a great little documentary series but it's 10 years old now, I hope they do another one soon I want to see the progress

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is kind of related to the BBC historical farm series. They are good as well. This is the Tudor monastery one:

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah I totally believe that nobody had licked a c**t until the 18th century. What a hero.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why so asspained anon?

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I head Cathedrals were long running projects by design, kept your stonemasons and engineers employed so you wouldn't lose skills that would be needed next time there's a war, otherwise whoops we need to build fortifications but it's been 30 years and the stonemasons all fricked off to the other side of the country because there was nothing for them to do over here

  18. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    If only they had finished it 800 years ago, alas

  19. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Well that's it I'm booting up Manor lord today.

  20. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn't the forest around the castle have been cut down historically? Should have build it in open terrain t b h.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Generally, only as a consequence of logging for wood. It wouldn't be unless an attack was expected that they would actually cut the forest back proper.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >I will not be afraid of death and bane, Till Birnam forest come to Dunsinane

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *