Good campfire meals that don't require refrigeration/cooler

Heyo

I'm going camping and looking for some good recipes that pack nicely and require minimal cooler space. and also taste good. I will have access to a wood stove and a small gas burner

breakfast recipes:
>oatmeal with, water, salt, dehydrated berries/foraged berries, peanut butter and chocolate chips (unsweetened)

Lunch or supper recipes:
>canned mackarel/foraged fish with herbs, orzo (pasta), and spinach
>beans or pea soup and turkey sausage

snacks:
>fruits, nuts, and chips

and thats it. im kind of drawing blanks after that

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    keep a jar of bouillon cubes with you, always good for whatever (fun to suck on too)
    if you want, i guess you could try making hummus, just mash up some cooked chickpeas & put any oil in it, boom, hummus
    if you brought powdered eggs, i imagine you could make eggdrop soup
    smoked / dried beef &/or venison is a classic for making a soup or stew
    cornmeal goes a long way in a lot of dishes
    dehydrated sweet potato makes a ridiculously good filler in soups & stews, same with pumpkin too
    aside from peanut butter, sunflower butter does a really good job for a more sweeter touch
    those little crystalized lemon / lime packets are amazing for flavoring water, plus, if you mixed one up in a just little bit of water, they act as a single wedge's worth, so they'd be perfect to add to any fish
    chili powder is always there to make an instant chili, like the cowboys did

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i think ill bring some steaks for the first night. good tips thanks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >try making hummus
      the hippie grocery near me sells dry powdered hummus in bulk. it's really good.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Breakfast: MOUNTAIN HOUSE BREAKFAST SKILLET

    Lunch: MOUNTAIN HOUSE BREAKFAST SKILLET

    Dinner: MOUNTAIN HOUSE BREAKFAST SKILLET

    Dessert: CIGARETTE

    Snacks: 2KG BULK PACK HARIBO GUMMY BEARS (UNSWEETENED)

    Drink: PICREL

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Dehydrate some spaghetti.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Bully beef

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    always add some avocado

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Good:
    Salami
    Penut butter
    Trail mix
    Tea and Coffee. Chai late sachets.
    Electrolyte sachets
    Fibre bars
    Fruit straps
    Pancake mix (dry)
    Hard cheese
    Crackers

    Bad:
    Tins
    Dry grains
    Dry legumes
    Bottles
    Eggs
    Fruit
    Pemmican

    I generally wouldn't recommend repackaging things because it's unreliable, most of the things in obnoxious packaging are perishable anyway. MRE packaging is for supply chain logistics, for the user mre just means a shit load of packaging.
    Vacuum packing has merit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Pemmican
      why the frick is Pemmican bad? selfmade Pemmikan and selfmade Beef Jerky are godlike for /out

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the same reason hardtacks are bad: its a pain in the ass to eat and tastes like shit
        there's a reason it stops becoming "popular" once food packaging started to get good

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Pemmican
      Ah yes, THE survival food is bad

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That drooling moron lives by the goyslop meme so his opinion doesn't matter

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        OP here, since pemmican has come up, can anyone share some pemmican recipes? I made a similar concept one with a similar concept but much sweeter, like a breakfast food or energy bomb. its not truly pemmican.

        >mix almond flour 1 cup
        >with cocao 1/4 cup maybe less.
        >with maple syrup or honey, 2 tbsp or until firmed up.

        >makes a ball that looks like shit but is delicious. its sticks together but not sticky
        >just keep in mind that maple syrup needs refrigeration of some sort.
        >haven't tested with honey yet.
        >be warned, it literally looks like shit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Bad:
      >Tins
      >Bottles
      Come on anon, you're not supposed to eat those.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Pemmican bad
      pleb detected. You know you're not supposed to eat it on its own right? You use it as a soup or stew base. Literally one of the best camping foods ever if you're not moronic.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Based post. You can also fry it up, with other things or by itself. Even modern injuns turn their nose up at eating pemmican raw.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Instant soups, anything in a can or MOUNTAIN HOUSE BREAKFAST SKILLET.

    But seriously if you're just going camping this isn't even a big concern. Just get something in a can and heat it. You're out camping dude, it'll taste good. I like crackers, nuts and dried fruit for snacks.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the question heavily depends on the type of camping you'll be doing
    are you camping from a car? then you can bring canned goods
    if you're backpacking you need to be more strategic and are limited to carrying things that are lightweight and can be cooked with hot water, reheated in boiling water, or eaten cold

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do people going backpacking call that camping? I've heard people who carry their stuff half a mile to a site pretend that's backpacking before. But backpackers don't call that camping that I'm aware of. Camping is drive-up camping. I dunno, maybe it's a regional difference.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        There's no set standard, for me it's easier to distinguish the difference between "car-camping" and "camping" by calling it "car-camping" and "backpacking" (which includes camping). If you ask me, so long as you have to carry your stuff at least over two miles through unpaved trail, that's bare-minimum backpacking. That alone will limit what you can bring in comparison to car-camping.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I feel like there is a standard. If you've got a pack that goes on your back and that's how you take your stuff from place to place, that's backpacking. If you go to a place and set up a camp, that's camping. I dunno: everyone who doesn't live in the Western US is weird so maybe it's different.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Well yes, you often set up camp while you are backpacking, thus you are "camping". The reason why we distinguish "camping" from "car-camping" is because the latter allows you many more amenities than the former. If you call "car-camping" just "camping" it's hard to tell if someone is hiking 15 miles to their campsite or driving up with their SUV.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I'm willing to chalk it up to regional differences. But honestly I've been camping and backpacking for decades (in my early forties, my dad took us backpacking the first time when I was maybe 11). Never have I once heard a single person refer to backpacking as "camping." Never have I heard anyone refer to anything as camping other than "car-camping" or "walk a mile in" camping.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Car camping is just a form of camping, it's not a whole new category. And there's no hyphen in "car camping".

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Right, the point is that there is a distinction between camping done with a car and camping done without one. If you ask me, so long as you are setting up a camp somewhere, you are camping, be it from a car or while you are backpacking.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Camping in general is where you set up a limited, temporary dwelling somewhere and live there for a bit. Where that location is and how you get your stuff there where the differences are.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Seriously no one calls backpacking "camping." That just isn't a thing. Is it some weird PrepHole delineation you guys have invented and is only internally meaningful? You go cannoning or rafting. That can involve camping. You go backpacking and that can include camping. You go on a rock climbing trip or a hunting trip and that can include camping. But if you're "going camping," you're driving to a place and pitching some tents, or at most walking a mile in. That's what you mean when you say you're going "camping," because the camping is the activity itself.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Bro the original post

            the question heavily depends on the type of camping you'll be doing
            are you camping from a car? then you can bring canned goods
            if you're backpacking you need to be more strategic and are limited to carrying things that are lightweight and can be cooked with hot water, reheated in boiling water, or eaten cold

            was asking if OP was backpacking (and presumably camping) at the spot he planned to camp, as opposed to camping from out of his car at drive-in ground.
            What the hell do you call camping that doesn't fit your criteria of "driving to a place and pitching some tents, or at most walking a mile in"? Your own definition doesn't even fit the other examples you provided of going canoeing, rafting, hunting, etc.
            Have you seriously never heard of car camping? Yes, some people mean car camping when they saying camping, but that's because it's a vague blanket statement that covers all types of camping, from primitive/wilderness/backcountry to glamping.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Idk what you're talking. Backpacking in an PrepHole context (across the entire community, not just on PrepHole) is a form of camping where you take your shit with you in a backpack. That's all.
            Maybe you're confusing it with thruhiking where you have a multiday hiking trip? Thruhikes almost inherently require backpacking, but there are times when you can stop in towns along the trail and get a motel and a hot meal, which isnt really camping. And similarly there are backpacking scenarios where you hoof it to a camping spot that you stay at for a week and then hoof it back.
            Or maybe you're conflating it with travel backpacking, like where you carry a change of clothes and a passport while hopping trains across Europe.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              OP here, sigh, this is a subject I know about. Camping as a concept in North America emerged WITH the automobile so there is in fact good reason to automatically assume camping means "car camping" automatically.

              Anyway, I didn't mention in the OP but I am also looking to avoid processed goyslop in plastic bags. With the help of this thread I have thought up of 2 new recipes. I also don't know why one anon recommended against dry grains, they seem ideal

              >salami, hard cheese, lentils, green on the side (probably also spinach

              Guaranteed forest SEXO meal

              >group meal: Carbonara: Use 4 onions, bag of spaghetti, pancetta (which is cured pork), some eggs if available but not strictly necessary, and parmesan or pecorino cheese, both hard and preserve well
              >Boil spagett

              in one pan
              >carmelize onion
              >soften up pancetta

              On the side:
              >beat eggs
              >shred cheese

              When pasta is ready
              >strain, throw it into the pan that has the pancetta and onion
              >combine with eggs, cheese, mix in IMMEDIATELY and the egg will cook and bind to the hot pasta
              >mix it all up

              >when served, add more cheese
              >guaranteed SEXO with all females within vicinity

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                i should state that I'm staying in a giant 4 person canvas tent with a woodstove and burner lol

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >OP here
                >sigh
                >SEXO
                >SEXO
                OP is a homosexual, as always. Are you car camping? Gives you some options.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                frick this again with the "car camping" did I name the JPG "car camping"? it's just camping. and yes I'm bringing a car. as previously stated.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Why are you such a child about this? I'm not the anon you're arguing textbook definitions with, nor did I read through all that terminally online horseshit. I was just trying to figure out what exactly it is you're doing so I can tailor advice to it.

                You can bring a whole ass grill. Canned sauces. The world is your oyster when it comes to car camping and cooking. Fishing would save you some cooler space, but canned fish as backup sounds like a plan.

                Depending on how long you're staying, you can easily dry most fruits in advance in a dehydrator. I make jerky in mine, too. Good snacks all around, and again takes up no cooler space.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I was sorta pulling your leg but c** camping genuinly irks me. its fine.

                dehydrator is a cool idea but don't think i go PrepHole enough to have one. Dehydrated foods are hella expensive but jerky is nice. ill make sure to pack some. Honeslty, I'm just going to chill for 3 days on a small remote peninsula in a canvas stove, probably in the rain, but the wood stove will keep me dry. I'm really looking forward to it

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >dehydrator is a cool idea but don't think i go PrepHole enough to have one. Dehydrated foods are hella expensive
                yeah that's the whole point of having one, and for the record most people dont use dried foods solely during camping. like i make banana chips to snack on at home and shit. And even still, your oven should be able to do it too

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                The dehydrator I have is a pretty cheap one (60 bucks, goes up to 70 degrees Celsius which is enough for jerky). I dehydrate apple slices which I add some cinnamon to, banana slices, strawberry slices (super sweet). No added sugar.

                Jerky is crazy expensive when you buy it premade. You obviously lose some weight when you dehydrate meat, but if you compare the price by weight for lean beef to jerky, it just doesn't compare at all. If you change your mind, be sure to get the leanest meat you can and trim off any fat (it won't keep well otherwise).

                You can also make fruit leather. I personally haven't tried that yet, but it's on my list.

                >dehydrator is a cool idea but don't think i go PrepHole enough to have one. Dehydrated foods are hella expensive
                yeah that's the whole point of having one, and for the record most people dont use dried foods solely during camping. like i make banana chips to snack on at home and shit. And even still, your oven should be able to do it too

                What this anon said is true, you can prop your oven door open and get about the same results. I just never liked that idea, especially since it has to run for quite a few hours. I like turning the dehydrator on on a timer and just letting it do its thing without having to babysit it.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I can set my oven to convection roast at like 175° and let it do it's thing. It's electric though idk if that makes a difference

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                (Me)
                Checked. Also scratch that, just noticed that it literally has a dehydrate function too that I've never used

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I think it's alright as long as there's airflow.

                >Lazy fruit leather suggestion:
                Buy Applesauce and dehydrate that. You can buy the kinds with different flavours for variety, or you can buy the plain stuff in jars. Obviously you get whatever they add into it but it works well and you don't have to do any of the prep to the fruit.

                Thanks anon, I'm going to give that a shot. Saves me a few steps.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Lazy fruit leather suggestion:
                Buy Applesauce and dehydrate that. You can buy the kinds with different flavours for variety, or you can buy the plain stuff in jars. Obviously you get whatever they add into it but it works well and you don't have to do any of the prep to the fruit.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Do people going backpacking call that camping?
        >I dunno, maybe it's a regional difference.
        I think it's an American distinction.
        In Australia, the UK and Europe I've only ever heard backpacking used to refer to the extended holidays where you're travelling from hostel to hostel, living out of your backpack but definitely not camping (at least not for the majority of your time), maybe hiking but more likely travelling by train/bus/hitchhiking. Camping is used to refer to both car camping and what might be called backpacking in the states.
        I'd literally never heard backpacking used to refer to camping (in the sense of hiking through the woods with a tent etc) until I browsed PrepHole.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      camping from a car, not backpack camping.

      Instant soups, anything in a can or MOUNTAIN HOUSE BREAKFAST SKILLET.

      But seriously if you're just going camping this isn't even a big concern. Just get something in a can and heat it. You're out camping dude, it'll taste good. I like crackers, nuts and dried fruit for snacks.

      meh, i did that once, just brought a bunch of stuff like that and yolo'd and it really sucked eating that for 3 days. i want nice meals.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Picrel, and you can get a lot of single serve stuff in plastic or sealed foil packs that are a little heavy but on short trips is whatevs, like tamales, also pickled eggs, single serve packets of pickled jalapeños…no refrigeration necessary and they can add a little substance to what might otherwise be trail slop

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For a while I was really into Indian food that comes in retort pouches. Sometimes I wouldn't even heat it up. You can also get plain shredded chicken in retort pouches. Just dump in some salt and spices and chow down.

    A lot of people wouldn't backpack with heavy hydrated foods like this, but I go places where I have to carry all my water anyway.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    country ham. any kind of canned meat really unless you are a sperg about cans

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    refried beans with rice, sharp cheddar cheese, taco seasoning and Frito's
    quick easy and filling

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    MREs

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Simmer brats in beer at home to cook them then freeze before adding to your cooler. Perfect for dinner your second night, just roast over the fire

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    breakfast
    >catch a grouse or quail
    lunch
    >catch a fish and forage wild garlic
    dinner
    >roast hare

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Powdered soups, such a nice thing to pack. Make it thin like a refreshing drink, or thick for a meal. The mushroom one makes a great base for sauce, just mix it up with chrozio or rice.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >refreshing drink
      I know you meant for that to sound fancy, but the thought of drinking cream of broccoli from a water bottle like it's a fricked-up gatorade test flavor is less than appetizing

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just eat pemmican, all you need my guy

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buckwheat with those crunchy fried onions, marjoram, garlic and any kind of meat.
    Traditionally you fry real onions with bacon, salo, or kielbasa but on the trail any dried meat will do.
    Apparently Americans have something called bacon bits which seem perfect for this, as long as you find ones made out of real bacon.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    50c* is the perfect temp to dehydrate meats and vegetables. If you load your oven with sheets of thinly cut meat (bacon if you are lazy), pasta and diced vegetables, you can dry a great mix of ready meals out of it. Mix in some gravy powder and dried herbs/spices and divide them into zip locks.
    When it is time to eat, add to the pot with some water and let it boil. The meat and vegetables will rehydrate and what ever water is left will boil the pasta and make a great sauce from the gravy.

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