>Foremost naval strategist of his time. >All he did was sail at them sideways

>Foremost naval strategist of his time
>All he did was sail at them sideways

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    homie was drifting ships 2 centuries ago.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >what is sailing close-hauled
      sailing ships always "drift" to some degree

      >Dictator is artillery officer
      >Naval artillery sucks
      How?

      Napoleon couldn't grok naval warfare

      The Spaniards had some... interesting ship designs but the British actually loved many of the ships they captured from the French and put into service.

      the most notable are the Hebe and Temeraire classes; the former a powerful French frigate class that inspired the British frigates that defeated USS President, the latter the famous 74 battleship and one of the RN's favourite ships

      however, an analysis of post-capture repairs indicates that many captured French ships were poorly built and suffered excessive leaking, and the RN often modified French designs and French ships to suit their different doctrine; the French built slower ships with heavier armament to prepare for the Channel invasion; the British preferred faster and more seaworthy ships for their distant blockade and global commerce protection mission
      (the Temeraire class was liked by the British precisely because it was well-balanced, unlike British second-rates or massive French first-rates like the Commerce de Marseille)

      so ultimately, one opinion is that although some aspects of French design was definitely praised, their ships were not particularly well-built and British captains favouring captured French ships is yet another literary meme descending from Marryat and Forester

      https://i.imgur.com/aJkmtJ7.jpeg

      >Foremost naval strategist of his time
      >All he did was sail at them sideways

      Nelson is known primarily for being an excellent naval tactician; he had an eye for knowing the right thing to do in a battle
      But he also contributed to RN strategy by doing his part to keep up excellent training and health standards for both officers and crew, resisting efforts to economise and cut corners unduly
      during this period the RN set the standard for training, health, logistics support, and tactical proficiency, ultimately leading to battles won

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Hebe
        Ah men of refined taste I see

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        All ships drift to some degree.

        t. Boat

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I WONDER IF YOU KNOW
      HOW THEY LIVE IN TOKYO

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think Nile was his only >100 IQ battle. But he wasn't really a strategist or known as such. He had the charisma to inspire the crews to incredible feats like beating incompetent french and spanish navies with terrible ship construction when the RN had numerical advantage. You can discern a lot from Horatio being their greatest hero.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >imfrickingplying that copenhagen wasn't >100IQ

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nelson wasn't really a brilliant strategist, he's just a national hero because he was in charge when the British Navy was overwhelmingly better than the French and Spanish in almost every single category (be it gunnery, officers, logistics, etc.)

      "Terrible ship construction" does not apply. French ship designs were excellent and considered to be among the best, or even best outright, in Europe.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry, that's true. I was judging them based on the USN OP all the time frigate construction of the same period.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Frigate
          Major naval battles were mostly thought by Third rate ships, silly. Frigates fall in the fifth and and sixth rates.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            burgers big up frigates all the time because they can't cope with the fact that in the Age of Sail they were a backwater colony and their largest warships were ordinary frigates

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              they fought well for the time and punched above their weight with good commanders. Not exactly backwater but a more regional power to be sure.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              if American frigates were so shit then why does the world speak American now and not British?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                USA is just UK 2.0

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Probably because American frigates in 1812 are different ships from aircraft carriers in the 21st century

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Pray tell which country would US ships of the line be fighting that the US frigates couldn't handle? Note the inferior seaworthiness of those ships of the line compared to frigates.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You know from 1813 the entire coast of America was blockaded by squadrons of three decked ships of the line, right? It bankrupted you. But yeah, Constitution beat a couple sloops so I guess who needs a 98 gun man o war.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                if the British and the French weren't at each others throats one of them would have (re)conquered the American colony
                >inferior seaworthiness of those ships of the line
                yes and battleships are slower than cruisers and destroyers, but they can force you to come at them
                and the American frigates were not better than contemporary British and French frigates, just initially successful against the second-tier British frigates they went up against.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >and the American frigates were not better than contemporary British and French frigates, just initially successful against the second-tier British frigates they went up against.
                Yes they were, all the new British and French frigates were made directly after US ones because US ones were so much better.

                What is this dumb fricking turd brain cope.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                You don't know shit.

                It is the French who pushed the boundaries with FS Pomone, a successful 24pdr super-frigate of 1,400 tons

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Um, I’m pretty sure John Paul jones invaded London u fricking European nerds

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Spaniards had some... interesting ship designs but the British actually loved many of the ships they captured from the French and put into service.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the RN had numerical advantage
      moron

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    when you got That One Move™ why change?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    At a quarter-past one in the afternoon, Hardy realized that Nelson was not by his side. He turned to see Nelson kneeling on the deck, supporting himself with his hand, before falling onto his side. Hardy rushed to him, at which point, Nelson smiled: "Hardy, I do believe they have done it at last .... my backbone is shot through"

    Nelson murmured, "Thank God I have done my duty", and when he returned, Nelson's voice had faded and his pulse was very weak. Nelson looked up, as Beatty took his pulse, then closed his eyes. Scott, who remained by Nelson as he died, recorded his last words as, "God and my country"

    he was pretty cool i gotta hand it to him

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like fancy free made up bullshit by previous junior officers to sell books after their military careers were over and wanted to cash in on that keystone battle.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >England expects that every man will do his duty.
        is a badass line though.
        Nelson's strength lies in the fact that he almost exclusively lived the sailor life and knew how to inspire men.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      he makes some shit rum the crippled frick

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He supposedly asked some guy there to kiss him before he died.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >There is only one stage,
    >AND IT IS CRAB.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yeah the French sucked at the time because of the post revolutionary officer purge and brain drain. They got better after the first truce but it was too late.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Didn't help that their gunnery doctrine was just bad. As it turned out, aiming for the part of the ship where the crew and weapons were was much better than aiming for the propulsion.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Dictator is artillery officer
        >Naval artillery sucks
        How?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          doesn't necessarily translate to naval artillery

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Napoleon was comically allergic to understanding naval warfare.
          >My admirals, why can't you just sail out
          >>the winds do not admit of it sire
          >what the frick are you idiots talking about literally anything is possible if you just do it
          >anyway now I shall build 1000 barges and we shall cross the english channel in a calm so the royal navy can't interfere
          >I see no way this could possibly fail

          Though as far as I know the doctrinal problem wasn't his doing, that's just how they were.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What a stupid post

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Napoleon was Italian and simple couldn't understand the innate cowardice of The French.
            However also being Italian he couldn't imagine combat that didn't involve men physically grappling with each other, which is why he only seemed to do well on land.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Italians were best in a type of combat where you move in elaborate ways and patterns while looking pretty to scare off any attackers, like peawieners, who might become destitute in honour and chivalry upon witnessing the drip of mfs by their side.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Napoleon was Italian
              Corsica is France, anon.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                His birthname was Napoleone di Buonaparte. That ain't French.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                lombard surname

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The doctrine was reasonable when capturing ships was essentially stealing hundreds of millions of dollars and years of time and getting to use that against your enemies.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The British could do that AND have effective gunnery
          It wasn't a good idea, anon

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            it actually was a good idea within the context that they made it, but that's a huge issue and I am too lazy type it all up. But the tl;dr version is that for a long period the French knew they were outclassed and chose to pursue strategic objectives and preserve their fleets if they could, while the Brits wanted to destroy French fleets even at the cost of other objectives.

            For example, a French fleet defending a massively vital grain convoy accepted battle from a superior British fleet, knowing it would likely destroy the fleet, and by firing high and crippling British rigging they allowed the convoy a better chance at escape. And if they did well enough in the battle, then they might get away with a chunk of the fleet and the Brits unable to pursue. It's notable that the two biggest British victories occurred when they attacked a French fleet at anchor (Battle of the Nile) and in extremely light winds (Trafalgar)

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That would be the case today, too.

          Ships are expensive.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >post revolutionary officer purge and brain drain
      Frogs were for murdering Nobles of all nations, but were allied with Spics, who were the most hidebound and 'trad' in that regard (and of course not really but to real European standards).

      Both hispanics and Frogs were mostly planning to let the other guy do all the real fighting in a battle of attrition, then sweep in to claim victory with a mostly intact fleet.

      Frogs fig hispanics and their fellow nobles in UK "Crown" would likely join forces to put France back under a king.

      Spics were afraid Constitutional Monarchy of UK might side with French Republic and "reform" Spanish govt, and given nature of hispanics that would be a lot of throat cutting.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >sail at them sideways

    That's literally the opposite of his strategy at Trafalgar though

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Those ships on the bottom left must be 50 miles long, lol

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        wut

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Rip santissima trinidad, best ship in NTW

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why did the British scuttle it after capturing it? It would have at least made a magnificent war trophy if anything.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I believe it wasn't a scuttling, the storm made it dangerous to tow her back and they had to cut it loose

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I like the fact that the French admiral drew this exact battle plan the night before when he explained how Nelson's fleet will operate tomorrow. Proving you can be predictable and still win.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Admiral Villeneuve himself expressed his belief that Nelson would use some sort of unorthodox attack, presciently speculating that Nelson would drive right at his line. But his long game of cat and mouse with Nelson had worn him down, and he was suffering from a loss of nerve. Fearing that his inexperienced officers would be unable to maintain formation in more than one group, he chose to keep the single line that became Nelson's target.

        He got scared and fell back on the orthodox tactics Nelson intended to directly counter.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          That line could have hold or at least caused massive damage to approachng ships , but Villenueve ordered a 180º turn with no wind that completelly fricked up his line of battle and created very convenient gaps, that "technique" has never been used again because the attackers would get fricked up.

          The statue should be the french admiral's one, not Nelson.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >On 22 April 1806, he was found dead at the Hôtel de la Patrie in Rennes with five stab wounds in the left lung and one in the heart.[4] He had left a farewell letter to his wife.[5] A verdict of suicide was recorded

            If nothing else it's impressive that he was able to commit suicide by stabbing himself in the chest 5 times. Russians could learn something

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >On 22 April 1806, he was found dead at the Hôtel de la Patrie in Rennes with five stab wounds in the left lung and one in the heart.[4] He had left a farewell letter to his wife.[5] A verdict of suicide was recorded
              Ah yes, the good'old Gazprom exec suicide

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >He got scared
          Duncan at Camperdown and latterly, Russia in 2022 shows why you don't ask your men to do more than they know how to do

          That line could have hold or at least caused massive damage to approachng ships , but Villenueve ordered a 180º turn with no wind that completelly fricked up his line of battle and created very convenient gaps, that "technique" has never been used again because the attackers would get fricked up.

          The statue should be the french admiral's one, not Nelson.

          Nelson's career spans from St Vincent to Trafalgar though
          And enemy commanders may make mistakes, but it takes skill on your side to take advantage of them and convert opportunities to victories

          Why did the British scuttle it after capturing it? It would have at least made a magnificent war trophy if anything.

          Too damaged to weather the storm that followed, which also saw the loss of many other captured ships

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          But he was also right the their fleet wouldn't be able to fight as seperate groups, there was no winning move for him.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nelson is a propaganda piece.
    Although, it is good propaganda I must say.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A man of singular vision.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >All he did was sail at them sideways
    Well I’d like to see you try it !

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    this dude fricked me up in college

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >We're sailing with the admiral tonight, boys
      A phrase which usually preceded alcohol poisoning. Good times

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Captain* Morgan

        And it was always so horrid, you usually just got sick before you could drink yourself into alcohol poisoning.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          admiral Nelson is also a popular rum brand

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Lord Cochrane was the real anime level protagonist of the Royal Navy of that period that inspired Master and Command and Hornblower

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      also the one RN admiral with an anime tier career that no one ever talks about is Admiral Keyes

      >Starts his career on anti-slavery patrols on a sail frigate in 1887 at age 15
      >during the boxer rebellion he leads a raiding party that boards and captures a squadron of chink destroyers
      >leads a shore party of 32 men that captures a chinese fort
      >was the first man over the walls of Peking to save the international legation
      >was an early proponent of submarine warfare before WW1
      >his submarine flotilla sunk a german heavy cruiser in 1914 and captured Tirpitz's son.
      >he was an operations officer during Gallipoli where he advocated a more aggressive strategy to clear minefields
      >lead a suicidal operation to clear a turkish minefield with a single cruiser and some trawlers which ends when his cruiser is heavily damaged by turkish shore batteries but escapes.
      >uses his submarine autism for early ASW operations
      >commands the marine raids on Zeebruge and Ostend in 1918
      >has a meh career as an interwar admiral
      >In 1940 despite being in reserve about to be retired he offers to lead another fricking raid on Trondheim to kick the germans out of Norway. Is Declined.
      >During the Norway debate the sunk Chamberlains government he showed up to the House of Commons in his 5 star admiral's dress uniform with his Boxer Rebellion and WW1 medals opening his speech attacking Chamberlain with "I speak for the fighting Navy..."

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Even one of Cochrane's batshit crazy successes would be enough to remember him, but the guy just kept pulling it off.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can replace Nelson with anyone and the Royal Navy would still win because they genuinely had an excellent pipeline for training officers
    See also: Admiral Duncan defeating the Dutch navy at Camperdown in 1797.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A strand of his hair was given to the Japs after the Battle of Tsushima.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What matters is not the fact that anybody could have done it, but the fact that nobody else did.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    naval strategist of his time
    >>All he did was sail at them sideways
    >Needs help from the fench admiral for his idea to work.

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The British were able to defeat the French/Spanish fleet in detail because they had poor cohesion, meanwhile the British were probably the most organised around.

    Often looking at the battle you wonder why the French/Spanish fleet used the tactics they did (basically no tactics) but they pretty much had no choice, the whole fleet would have been impossible to control any other way, they struggled to keep up even that simple battle line.

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    *headshot*

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Trafalgar was one of history's all time beat downs. I can barely imagine what it would be like in England hearing the reports.

    You wouldn't see anything like it until the Gulf War. And even then Saddam Hussein wasn't intending to invade the USA. This was beyond that even.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also his mistress was qt

      His last message "England expects that every man will do his duty", his fatal last battle, how London is architected to honor this battle, it's really interesting.

      Also I went on the HMS Victory in Portsmouth and went to St. Pauls cathedral where his tomb is. What a story.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        last post, drunk and making an idiot of myself

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >1 schooner
      fricken hell c**t spilled me beer in the war fricks sake

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I was at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard and they really put emphasis on how jubilant the reception of Trafalgar was at home. To have such a famous admiral provide such a great victory basically made it the biggest national coomfest of a naval officer since Francis Drake's voyages.

      Also its pretty cool to stand on the exact spot where Nelson got shot and to go under the keel and see the repair damage from where Victory tanked a German 250kg bomb in 1940.

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Combat before long range communications and high speed maneuver elements was slow enough that simple tactics were often the best. Take cannae for example, a tactic simplistic enough that anyone could see it coming if they had a better picture of the battle, but the Roman leadership was dead not long after the battle started and the battle lines did what they were supposed to do until ordered otherwise. The success of that tactic was predicated on Hannibal knowing exactly what the Romans were going to do. It's no wonder it never happened twice.

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    hol up dis whiteboy be drifting ships an shit

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Foremost army strategist of his time
    >All he did was strike people by their rear

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Strategy is everything including planning amd ordering new ships, training crews and practicing drills. It is about where ships sail and patrol, how much and which provisions, communication, command and control and how to get a larger chunk of your navy to win against the enemy navy while they try to do the same to you.

    Maneuvering a line of ships to cross a T is tue easy part.

  23. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Actually, the historical documentary Master & Commander taught me that he said "nevermind the maneuvers, just go straight at them"

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